Abt the memory thing... I dunno whether this will work for everyone, but I used this method for a full hour recital, so should be ok. Do u guys have any ways to memory playing?:
1. Memorise as usual, but do not only by the shape, mechanical order of the fingers esp. 20th century, baroque pcs )...but most importantly by sound.
Doing by sound helps u to get the picture as a whole, as the sole purpose of memorising is to ensure a better flow/ more expressive performance of the music. And doing by sound helps u to pick up wherever u`re left off, esp. so when u play wrong notes during a recital.
Ie : Sometimes I played wrong notes in either hands, but as long as one of my hands`s still playing the main melody, then by hook or by crook, the other hand`ll join in soon. There`ll not be a big gap of silence without knowing how to continue from ur mistake...that`s when you`ll feel really awkard. So, let yr ears help u.
2. Memorising also means the ability to start anywhere as u like. It doesn`t mean that u can only start from a particular portion or section of the piece. If so, this only means that u`re only familiar with the main sections, not the piece as a whole.
3. Always practice running through the whole programme when yr done memorising the small parts. Alot of people only work on parts that they think are not so good...There`s nothing wrong with that, but if yr preparing to play infront of any `audience`/exam...it`s always essential to run through the whole actual programme daily. And dun try to correct your mistakes...just go on. This will make sure that u dun get blank outs during the occassion that u do play wrong notes in an exam. Remember! Playing wrongly doesn`t mean that u have to stop. If u have this bad habbit of stopping, then u must run through the whole programme consistently to change this bad habbit.
4. Try playing with the radio or Tv on. This is the best method I`ve tried so far. Bcaz though I`m quite used to memorising . but unfortunately, I`ve a very short concentration span. This will help u to stay focus, esp. for longer programmes like sonatas,suites or even concertos.
5. Reverse order. And perhaps this's the most important strategy. Just like 'studying' itself... You're always told to study smart by preparing for the last subject first and so on.... So I always believe it's important to rehearse/practice the last programme first during the actual day of the concert. Why? So that u get to do yr first item last! And u're left with the 'freshest' finger memory for that nerve-wrecking first item. If u manage to pull off that first one, the rest will fall nicely in place.
So, remember. Reherse the other way round.
Article taken from http://www.solomusic.net/forum