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#2318475 - 08/22/14 07:36 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
fizikisto Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/13/12
Posts: 549
Loc: Hernando, MS
I disagree somewhat with EarlofMar, in that I think that scales are valuable for a dedicated beginner (i.e. one who won't quit because their teacher makes them do boring stuff like scales). Everyone is different of course, so you have to find what works for you. But scales, if used properly, can really help build a strong foundation.

I don't think it's a good idea to learn them all at once (especially for a beginner). Rather, I think it's best to learn them piecemeal as you start playing pieces in different keys. Now here's the thing. You have to focus on the right thing. And for a beginner, speed is absolutely the wrong thing to focus on. Don't worry about playing your scales quickly. If you play them properly, speed will come naturally.

Focus instead on playing them with relaxation. Focus on eliminating tension as you play them. And focus on playing them evenly in terms of dynamics (loudness) and rhythm. And when you play scales hands together, focus on getting the notes played by each hand to strike simultaneously (absolutely no lag).

Once you have the basic scales down, they make a fantastic warm up. And once you have them down, you can also start to challenge yourself with variations.

Now, I'm a big fan of playing scales because I get a lot of value from them. More than just technique, I also find that playing scales will center me. It lets me sort of empty my mind of whatever is going on in my life and then just be at the piano. I've previously compared playing scales to meditation, and they can be that if you approach them with that frame of mind.

And finally, when you are ready to speed up, I think scales are the best place to introduce the use of a metronome. But when you do, always always focus on staying relaxed.
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#2318482 - 08/22/14 08:00 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: fizikisto]
Purkoy Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/13/14
Posts: 53
Loc: United Kingdom
Originally Posted By: fizikisto
And for a beginner, speed is absolutely the wrong thing to focus on.


It's kinda reassuring to know that I'm making the 'right mistakes'. Whether it's scales or a simple piece I've been practising, I found I'm often trying to play them at the speed I've heard them played by experienced performers, as in my head that sounds 'right'. And of course, imprecision, fumbling, and frustration follow.

I also like scales (which I found unexpected) ; and often, when I've been practising some measures, and everything seems to be losing shape or focus, I stop, close my eyes, and play scales. This has the effect of dissolving the frustrations, and bringing me 'back to base'.
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#2318506 - 08/22/14 08:52 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: fizikisto]
BrianDX Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/14/14
Posts: 747
Loc: Lewes DE
Originally Posted By: fizikisto
I think that scales are valuable for a dedicated beginner (i.e. one who won't quit because their teacher makes them do boring stuff like scales). Everyone is different of course, so you have to find what works for you. But scales, if used properly, can really help build a strong foundation.

I don't think it's a good idea to learn them all at once (especially for a beginner). Rather, I think it's best to learn them piecemeal as you start playing pieces in different keys. Now here's the thing. You have to focus on the right thing. And for a beginner, speed is absolutely the wrong thing to focus on. Don't worry about playing your scales quickly. If you play them properly, speed will come naturally.

Focus instead on playing them with relaxation. Focus on eliminating tension as you play them. And focus on playing them evenly in terms of dynamics (loudness) and rhythm. And when you play scales hands together, focus on getting the notes played by each hand to strike simultaneously (absolutely no lag).

Once you have the basic scales down, they make a fantastic warm up. And once you have them down, you can also start to challenge yourself with variations.

Now, I'm a big fan of playing scales because I get a lot of value from them. More than just technique, I also find that playing scales will center me. It lets me sort of empty my mind of whatever is going on in my life and then just be at the piano. I've previously compared playing scales to meditation, and they can be that if you approach them with that frame of mind.

And finally, when you are ready to speed up, I think scales are the best place to introduce the use of a metronome. But when you do, always always focus on staying relaxed.

Really excellent advice IMHO!
_________________________
Groucho Marx: "Now we're getting somewhere"
2013 Yamaha C2X | 2001 Yamaha M500-F .
Current: Schein - Allemande | Faber - Vivace, Lunar Eclipse

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#2318784 - 08/23/14 01:46 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
I started and finished "Rock it Away" today, the first song win the Alfred's book with flats. OK, yeah, it was a simple song. I also worked on the next few pages that covered Half Steps, Whole Steps, and Tetrachords.

earlofmar: Thanks for sharing your experience with scales and exercises. I've read some about the controversy of doing Hannon exercises, and decided a while ago not to do them.

I'm not trying to get my fingers to be more nimble. Right now I'm using the exercises in the books I have to help with some issues I'm having with poor posture, tension, dropped wrists, clumsy fingering, etc. The exercises are short and simple so I can actually relax while doing them and focus on technique. After just a couple days I'm already seeing some improvement, so I feel like I'm on the right track.

And I'm not in any danger of becoming addicted to piano exercises or scales. Most of my practice time is still spent on working through my Alfred's method book and learning to play new pieces. I think that's a pretty good balance.

fizikisto: Thanks a bunch! I will definitely be focusing on all those things you mention; relaxing, playing evenly, etc. And I'm not in any hurry to get scales up to any particular speed.

But can you please clarify when to introduce the metronome? How do I know when I'm ready to speed up? Do you mean once I get the fingering under control with hands together?

Purkly: I know what you mean about speeding up a piece. But more in the way of trying to get a song up to tempo. Oftentimes the tiniest uptick in speed feels like my fingers are having to learn the piece all over again.

Brian: Opinions, whether humble or not, are always appreciated.
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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#2318793 - 08/23/14 02:27 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
fizikisto Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/13/12
Posts: 549
Loc: Hernando, MS
Linda
Yes. As you play scales, you'll find that with enough practice it's not too hard to increase their speed pretty well. When you've got the patterns under your fingers (i.e., you don't need to think about them to play them) at a good range of tempos (from really slow to reasonably fast), and you can play them relaxed and without tension...that's the time to bring in the metronome. Ten different people might give you 10 completely different yet equally valid ways to approach this, there are a lot of ways you could do it and get effective results. This would be my approach:

Set the metronome at a pretty slow tempo, a tempo slow enough that you would never screw up playing the scale because of speed. And play the scale in quarter notes (that is, for every tick of the metronome, you play one note). With the metronome you're introducing something new, so make sure that you're not letting tension creep in. Do it for a bit each day, for as long as it takes for you to be completely comfortable with it (which might take a few days or a few weeks...there's no rush). Then play it in eighth notes (for ever tick of the metronome, you play two evenly spaced notes 1-and 2-and 3-and.... where you play the numbers on the tick). You'll be playing the scale twice as fast as your slow speed...that's why you want to start your metronome out really slow to begin with. Again, do that until you're completely comfortable, then you can move up to playing 16th notes (four evenly spaced notes for every tick of the metronome 1-ee-and-ah 2-ee-and-uh etc...). So here you'll be playing 4 times as fast as your beginning speed.

Once you can do that really comfortably, you can increase the speed on the metronome a bit, and then start the procedure all over. And remember, even though you're using the metronome to increase your speed of playing, speed is the LEAST important thing. Focus on playing relaxed, keep at it, and speed will come. If you find yourself getting frustrated, it probably means that you're trying to move up in tempo too quickly....So if you're having trouble playing the 16th notes, you may need to practice 8th notes more....or you might even need to lower the tempo of your metronome and start over with quarter notes. Don't worry about it. It may seem like it takes forever for speed to come, but it will come. And you'll be able to play fast and relaxed and with good dynamic control.

Hope that helps. smile
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#2318803 - 08/23/14 04:22 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
MandyD Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/12/14
Posts: 110
Loc: Australia
Earlofmar that bloke was pretty frightening lol.

I'm waiting to learn my next lot of scales. I've learnt the C, G & D major ones, and attempted the A major on my own. I can play 2 octaves easily in the one hand & sometimes to give my fingers a workout will do 3 or 4 octaves, but I struggle playing 2 octaves hands together with G & D, although I'm fine doing one octave and also 2 octaves of contrary motion with all of them.

For anyone who wants a bit of light reading (not!) on scales I found this and plan to one day sit down and go through it as it does look very informative if a little heavy going. http://waltercosand.com/CosandScores/Composers%20A-D/Cooke,%20James%20Francis/Mastering_the_Scales_and_Arpeggios.pdf

My teacher has assured me that they are a necessary evil (I actually don't mind them though), and that once I learn arpeggios she said I will come across pieces of music and my hands will just fall into place from having already practiced them? She seems to think like you fizi, that speed will sort itself out but I have to concentrate on playing them with the same pressure on each key and no lagging or speeding up, oh and there can be absolutely NO lag when my thumb goes underneath either. She's a bit hard like this, but I need someone like this or I'll slacken off lol.
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#2318813 - 08/23/14 06:16 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: MandyD]
earlofmar Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/21/13
Posts: 1633
Loc: Australia
Originally Posted By: MandyD
Earlofmar that bloke was pretty frightening lol.
I actually managed to learn most of it and had some good success particularly in strengthening lower arm muscles but it is a hard exercise.

Quote:

but I struggle playing 2 octaves hands together with G & D, although I'm fine doing one octave and also 2 octaves of contrary motion with all of them.
Scales are difficult as you have to be very focused but just like a piece of music muscle memory eventually kicks in and they become second nature. So it just comes down to steady practice.

Quote:

For anyone who wants a bit of light reading (not!) on scales I found this and plan to one day sit down and go through it as it does look very informative if a little heavy going. http://waltercosand.com/CosandScores/Composers%20A-D/Cooke,%20James%20Francis/Mastering_the_Scales_and_Arpeggios.pdf



added to my collection thanks so much
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#2318912 - 08/23/14 01:31 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: fizikisto]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
Originally Posted By: fizikisto
Hope that helps. smile

Very much so! I'm so glad you explained in detail because I had no idea about using the metronome in that way with scales. I'm not at all concerned about trying to get to a certain speed any time soon, but at least now I'll know how to go about it when I get to that point. Thank you! smile
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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#2319089 - 08/24/14 02:15 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
Had a lot going on today but I managed to do a few pages in the Alfred's book that cover the C major scale, and then I started in on "Joy to the World." I also spent some time flipping through a huge fake book and finally picked a song to try tomorrow; "Take Me Home, Country Roads. I think it might be a bit too hard for me - 3 sharps and a lot of chords, but I'm going to give it a try anyway.
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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#2319145 - 08/24/14 08:06 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
Alux Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/28/13
Posts: 37
Loc: Perth, Australia (Originally f...

Since I've started with a new teacher (10 years experience with a 20 year old teacher compaired to 50 years worth with a 62 year old), I've realized how important learning the scales really is.
By that I mean I learned the scales with Alfred's as I went along but focused more on the songs & techniques. Now that I've started with Level 2 I realized how important they are and now working on learning them. Starting from scratch I'm working on C,G,D & A Maj scales two octaves in parallel & contrary along with their respective root, first & second inversions. She also has me doing chromatics for each scale position and eventually learn their arpeggios & cadences. As dry as it all sounds to some I'm starting to approach them as I do a new lesson song, outside material or as Fizikisto mentioned, something to be enjoyed. smile

Fizikisto, while I remember go have a look at Alfred's "The Complete Book of Scales, Chords, Arpeggios & Cadences".

Cheers,
Alux
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Alfred's Adult All-In-One Level 2
Alfred's Adult All-In-One Level 1 Graduate

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#2319445 - 08/25/14 12:04 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
Well, today was pretty much working on the same stuff as yesterday. I'll need another day or two for "Joy to the World." Hands together for the C major scale is coming along slowly. It was a short practice, so didn't a chance to start that new fake song. Maybe next time.

Alux, are you using the same fingering as in the Alfred's scale book?
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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#2319542 - 08/25/14 07:29 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: TX-Bluebonnet]
Alux Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/28/13
Posts: 37
Loc: Perth, Australia (Originally f...

Originally Posted By: TX-Bluebonnet
Alux, are you using the same fingering as in the Alfred's scale book?


Hi Linda,

Yes, I use the same fingering. Have a look around the internet & you'll see it's standard. I start learning new scales in contrary, that way I get use to the fingering and what keys to hit without getting confused as I tend to do in parallel. Just remember it's not a race so take your time and go at your own pace.
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Alfred's Adult All-In-One Level 2
Alfred's Adult All-In-One Level 1 Graduate

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#2319865 - 08/25/14 10:45 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
Thanks, Alux. I think I do a little too much looking around the internet, and get myself confused in the process. smile
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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#2319869 - 08/25/14 11:21 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
Mike407 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/30/14
Posts: 45
Loc: Florida, USA
My teacher signed off on O Sol Mio and Jericho today so the pages in book one are getting thin. Lots of work left but I've started thinking about book 2, which she uses. I okay with that but I'd also like a parallel classical book as I'd like to be playing a little more classical than Alfred teaches.

Does that make sense? Any suggestions on the book to use?

Mike
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103 year old Schmoller and Mueller
Slightly newer Kawai ES 100

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#2319875 - 08/25/14 11:38 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
fizikisto Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/13/12
Posts: 549
Loc: Hernando, MS
Mike,
I like Rachel Jimenez's Fundamental Keys. It's inexpensive, and it makes a great supplement to the alfred's method (though it can be used stand-alone too, that's what it is designed for). It starts out with very simple pieces, but with rare exceptions nothing is simplified. It is mostly pieces written by classical composers for their own students.
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#2320289 - 08/26/14 05:11 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
Mike407 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/30/14
Posts: 45
Loc: Florida, USA
Thanks, fizikisto. I took a look today and ordered her book.
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Mike

103 year old Schmoller and Mueller
Slightly newer Kawai ES 100

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#2320446 - 08/27/14 12:52 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
After a couple of days with short practice sessions I finally had a good chunk of time to work on "Joy to the World." I feel like I made a lot of progress on it today, however there's still room for improvement, plus I still need to add the pedal in. At the rate I'm learning this piece it'll probably be a few more days before I'm finished with it. That's okay, though. It's not like I have a deadline to meet. smile
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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#2320491 - 08/27/14 04:57 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
EnGee Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/28/14
Posts: 71
Loc: Auckland, NZ
You seems to be doing well Linda smile

I'm still going slow, maybe very slow! I'm not recording everything though as I planned. Too lazy for that. Recitals would be enough for recording I think.

About Alfred's book, I've just finished "Rockets" and "Marry Ann" before it. They are easy (easier than my other parallel learning resource, e-media Piano Tutorial, which I'm still in "La Donna e mobile" for more than one week!).

I feel I'm progressing especially since the preparation for the recital. now even my typing on this computer's keyboard is with a good timing and rhythm! :-D

I believe those who without a teacher, should really take it slow and try to absorb all the info and lessons, otherwise the whole learning process would be not that useful. At least this is what I'm keep doing :-)

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#2320496 - 08/27/14 05:41 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
MandyD Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/12/14
Posts: 110
Loc: Australia
It sounds like everyone is going ahead in leaps and bounds on here, well done everyone. smile I started on Cafe Vienna today and I'm up to Harp Song in my other Alfred's book (later beginner) which is exciting as it means I've nearly finished that book - Yay!

I'm going to have a look at that Fundamental Key book as I've seen it mentioned a few times now. Anything to help. I also think that at this level if I can get my foundations really strong it will help if I ever get to more advanced pieces.

EnGee are you doing this on your own without a teacher? If so how do you find doing it that way? It sounds like your doing it the way my teacher would like me to, slow and steady so you really learn it all thoroughly.

I've been working on my Stuckchen piece for the Schumann recital and I have to say that's been an interesting experience, but I had a break through yesterday so hopefully by March I can actually play it to tempo and not like I do now lol. I don't know about anyone else, but every single piece of music I am attempting to have a go at, I am learning so much from. A classic example is for instance the bottom staff isn't always a bass clef! blush
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#2320501 - 08/27/14 06:10 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
EnGee Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/28/14
Posts: 71
Loc: Auckland, NZ
Hi Mandy. You are doing very well I guess smile

Yes, I'm without a teacher. This is not the first time that I learn/study something by myself, so that I learnt to take it slow. I agree with your teacher. You should slow down. You also should not spend a long time with the Piano. I'm spending maximum one hour daily. Half an hour with e-madia tutorial and half an hour with Alfred's book, then I go to the other desk (which has my desktop computer and 49 midi keyboard controller), and try to prepare for the next lessons by using a notation program ..etc. (also for my other hobby, electronic music smile )

I have enough tools includes the net to have answers to my questions. I usually read a lot here as well and I find it very useful if not my main resource indeed for learning or for the general direction of my learning. Although I have some background in Music Theory but I felt the need to really learn how to play Piano, so I understand everything I want to know including the Music Theory step by step. I put about 5 years as a first goal. We will see after that.

The only thing that really puzzles me is that: What is the line between a beginner and intermediate levels? Are the three levels of Alfred's books only for the beginner's level? Who is a beginner in the Recital? I really can't believe that all in the Recital are beginners!! I think then I will find out with time if no one answer me ;-)


Edited by EnGee (08/27/14 06:13 AM)

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#2320508 - 08/27/14 07:31 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: EnGee]
earlofmar Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/21/13
Posts: 1633
Loc: Australia
Originally Posted By: EnGee


The only thing that really puzzles me is that: What is the line between a beginner and intermediate levels? Are the three levels of Alfred's books only for the beginner's level? Who is a beginner in the Recital? I really can't believe that all in the Recital are beginners!! I think then I will find out with time if no one answer me ;-)


I'll take a stab at some of this: I don't know if there are proper definitions but I would say a beginner is someone who can play pieces between grade 1-4 and an intermediate player is 5 and onwards until you get to advanced repertoire.

The Alfred book 2 in my opinion varies between grade 1 & 2, while Alfred book 3 varies between grade 2 & 3. The advanced section of book 3 with Moonlight Sonata, Fur Elise, etc varies in difficulty right up to grade 6 or even 7. No idea why it was ever included in the book.

I think historically the ABF was formed for beginners but it has been going for years and many have joined and just stayed on. Maybe because it is such a nice forum to be involved with or partly because they still feel like beginners.
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#2320511 - 08/27/14 07:36 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: earlofmar]
johan d Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/20/14
Posts: 110
Loc: Belgium
...


Edited by johan d (08/27/14 08:15 AM)

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#2320519 - 08/27/14 07:59 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
fizikisto Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/13/12
Posts: 549
Loc: Hernando, MS
Earlofmar
I don't think there are any official definitions either, so yours seems reasonable to me. Even the grading of pieces is somewhat arbitrary, because there's so much more to playing piano than just hitting the right notes. A professional playing a grade 4 or grade 5 piece is going to play it with much more musicality (and at a much higher standard) than someone who is just now playing at that level and learning those pieces.

And yes, based on how it's evolved, I think this forum is probably a bit misnamed now. It might be better to change its name to the "Adult Students" forum. I suspect that even some of the advanced players and teachers that hang out here would tell you that in many ways they still consider themselves students. There's always something new to learn. If piano world were a democracy, I'd vote for changing the name, but maybe that's just me being a bit pedantic -- if it ain't broke....etc... smile

Warm Regards
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Roland RD800

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#2320545 - 08/27/14 08:56 AM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: earlofmar]
BrianDX Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/14/14
Posts: 747
Loc: Lewes DE
Originally Posted By: earlofmar
Originally Posted By: EnGee


The only thing that really puzzles me is that: What is the line between a beginner and intermediate levels? Are the three levels of Alfred's books only for the beginner's level? Who is a beginner in the Recital? I really can't believe that all in the Recital are beginners!! I think then I will find out with time if no one answer me ;-)


I'll take a stab at some of this: I don't know if there are proper definitions but I would say a beginner is someone who can play pieces between grade 1-4 and an intermediate player is 5 and onwards until you get to advanced repertoire.

The Alfred book 2 in my opinion varies between grade 1 & 2, while Alfred book 3 varies between grade 2 & 3. The advanced section of book 3 with Moonlight Sonata, Fur Elise, etc varies in difficulty right up to grade 6 or even 7. No idea why it was ever included in the book.

I think historically the ABF was formed for beginners but it has been going for years and many have joined and just stayed on. Maybe because it is such a nice forum to be involved with or partly because they still feel like beginners.

When I joined the forum I started this thread which kind of asks the same basic questions:

http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/2284754/1.html
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Groucho Marx: "Now we're getting somewhere"
2013 Yamaha C2X | 2001 Yamaha M500-F .
Current: Schein - Allemande | Faber - Vivace, Lunar Eclipse

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#2320664 - 08/27/14 01:02 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
Hitry Plan Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/21/14
Posts: 13
200 pages thread, wow, What a Way to Go!
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Yamaha P-155, Yamaha Motif Rack XS(with mLan),Yamaha HS7, Cubase 7.5

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#2320756 - 08/27/14 05:22 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: fizikisto]
Purkoy Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/13/14
Posts: 53
Loc: United Kingdom
Originally Posted By: fizikisto
And yes, based on how it's evolved, I think this forum is probably a bit misnamed now. It might be better to change its name to the "Adult Students" forum.


I can see the rationale for that, or the alternative suggested elsewhere of Adult Learners Forum. I was drawn to this forum by its name, because it describes me perfectly. Until I got here, I'd tacitly assumed that beginners almost invariably started when they were two and a half (OK, that's poetic licence, I know, but it can seem that way if you spend too long perusing YouTube to see how others tackle the pieces you're struggling with, and find a five-year-old in pigtails dashing it off with poise and ease), and finding adults who'd started in middle age or older was such a blessed relief. I didn't feel so isolated, or like a fish out of water.

One thing that's hard for someone like me to overstate, is how useful it has been to find an environment where there are people at my stage, which is very early beginner. It's incredibly encouraging to find that there are people who are tackling the same level of pieces I am, the same kinds of exercises, and moreover encountering the same kinds of problems, and blockages, and frustrations, and hurdles, and joys, as I am. What makes it a better forum still, is that there's a range of levels of experience, evident both from how people speak and the indicators of which new pieces they are tackling ; they always seem willing to give the benefit of their experience to novices and tyros, without talking down. And the icing on the cake, for me, is the contributions from people who are also teachers, who give advice so feeely. The mix is pretty well perfect from my perspective.
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#2320758 - 08/27/14 05:32 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Purkoy]
JimF Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/08/09
Posts: 1737
Loc: south florida
Originally Posted By: Purkoy
One thing that's hard for someone like me to overstate, is how useful it has been to find an environment where there are people at my stage, which is very early beginner. It's incredibly encouraging to find that there are people who are tackling the same level of pieces I am, the same kinds of exercises, and moreover encountering the same kinds of problems, and blockages, and frustrations, and hurdles, and joys, as I am.


Yep. And you will still find the same to be true three years from now when you are playing a different level of repertoire. Bottom line, it is nice to have fellow-travelers on this journey....always.
_________________________
La Fille aux cheveux de lin - Debussy
Ma Mere L'Oye - Ravel
Mozart Sonata K545

Estonia L190 #7284





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#2320769 - 08/27/14 05:56 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Purkoy]
Dennis in Canada Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/14
Posts: 30
Loc: Duclos, Québec, Canada
Ditto from me, Purkoy.
_________________________
Dennis

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#2320819 - 08/27/14 08:09 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
MandyD Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/12/14
Posts: 110
Loc: Australia
and me too Purkoy.

I do have to say if it was called the Adult Students I might not have even looked at this forum. It was the word "Beginner" that drew me to it, and I am so grateful I joined up as I have learnt so much more, so much quicker than I would have with just my weekly lesson. I love that there are people at my level that I can relate to and struggle with, but I also very much love that there are more experienced pianists of all levels that participate, and that they are so willing to share their knowledge and experience with us newbies. Also apart from my piano teacher I have no-one else (apart from my 8yo daughter who is too young to count here) who shares my love and what has become a passion for the piano, so it is so good to be amongst others who do and are so encouraging at the same time.
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#2320886 - 08/27/14 11:36 PM Re: Alfred's Basic and ALL in One Adult Piano Course Book #1 [Re: Mark...]
TX-Bluebonnet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/14
Posts: 243
Loc: Central Texas
Well hello everyone! I stepped away for a moment and missed the party. frown

Adult student doesn't sound right to me since, well, I don't have a teacher. Adult learner, maybe. But I'm good with adult beginner in the sense that I started as an adult.

I read in another forum that it's recommended to learn a piece hands together. I think I'll give that a try on the next one I come to in the Alfred's book, which will be "Cockles and Mussels." I don't want to start on it, though, until I'm satisfied with "Joy to the World."

EnGee, it sounds like you're doing really well, especially since you're using multiple methods at once. I liked "Mary Ann," thought it was a catchy little tune. Once in a while I video record myself, just for me to see. It's quite an eye-opener, and not usually in a good way.
_________________________
Linda

Started my piano journey June 2014 at age 54.
My digital piano: Casio Privia PX-850.
Working on "Alfred's Adult All-In-One Course" Book 1
XXXV

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