Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#1138628 - 03/12/08 08:17 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by gmm1:
 Quote:
Originally posted by J. Mark:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Gyro:
I believe that a weighted-key digital piano
would be the best thing for developing "touch."
Digital pianos are superior for developing
technique. [/b]
One of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard. The one thing you absolutely cannot develop on a digital is touch. [/b]
At least from a beginners point of view, J.Mark, I feel I am developing a nice touch on my digital. It will absolutely not transfer to an acoustic (or even another digital even), but thats normal, I think.

[/b]
I'm not at all sure it won't transfer. I practice on a digital but play at church a couple times a week. I can move easily from my digital to the grand, but moving from the digital to one of the beat up unmaintained uprights, or from upright to grand, is misery.

Turn the master volume on your digital up high, then try to play softly - how could you not develop touch doing that? That's a practice technique simply not available on an acoustic. I guess you could do the opposite as well, turn it way down and try to play loudly. Not sure that one works, I haven't tried it.
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
Piano & Music Accessories
#1138629 - 03/12/08 09:12 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
The digital can create sound for you, but you cannot create sound through the digital. It will give you loud and soft, but there is no mechanism inside to respond to subtle shadings of what you are doing and so create shades of sound. There is no hammer that swings away, so that you can start to feel its rocking and work or play with it. There are no strings that vibrate, so you cannot play with the sympathetic ring of partials by using the physics of the instrument, becuase there are no physics. You have some engineer's concept of sound, some other pianist's touch programmed into the system and you are stuck playing what these two ghost characters have put in. The sound itself comes out of one speaker, rather than three-dimensionally along the soundboard, along the individual string and possibly other strings to create shades and color. But yes, you can get loud, soft, and degrees of staccato and legato.

Top
#1138630 - 03/12/08 09:34 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
J. Mark Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/06
Posts: 1323
 Quote:
Originally posted by TimR:
 Quote:
Originally posted by gmm1:
 Quote:
Originally posted by J. Mark:
quote:
Originally posted by Gyro:
I believe that a weighted-key digital piano
would be the best thing for developing "touch."
Digital pianos are superior for developing
technique. [/b]
One of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard. The one thing you absolutely cannot develop on a digital is touch. [/b]
At least from a beginners point of view, J.Mark, I feel I am developing a nice touch on my digital. It will absolutely not transfer to an acoustic (or even another digital even), but thats normal, I think.

[/b]
I'm not at all sure it won't transfer. I practice on a digital but play at church a couple times a week. I can move easily from my digital to the grand, but moving from the digital to one of the beat up unmaintained uprights, or from upright to grand, is misery.

Turn the master volume on your digital up high, then try to play softly - how could you not develop touch doing that? That's a practice technique simply not available on an acoustic. I guess you could do the opposite as well, turn it way down and try to play loudly. Not sure that one works, I haven't tried it.

I'm not saying the digital is useless. It is a useful practice tool. And certainly there is a level of "touch" that can be developed on a digital. But at least in my opinion, you have a very real ceiling above which you cannot go with a digital. What is that famous quote about Chopin having 1000 ways to play pianissimo? Well, not on a digital.

I'm not an advanced player. But it was working on some Satie and some Chopin that I finally realized the range of sounds that can be pulled from a good grand piano. It's a joke trying to do it with a digital. It just isn't there.

Top
#1138631 - 03/12/08 11:34 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by J. Mark:
I'm not an advanced player. But it was working on some Satie and some Chopin that I finally realized the range of sounds that can be pulled from a good grand piano. It's a joke trying to do it with a digital. It just isn't there. [/b]
And you may be right, I'm not an advanced player either. I'm probably not at the point where I notice the nuances.

But notice you used the phrase "good grand piano." My practice on the digital at home transfers very well to the grand I play for church services. They really aren't that far apart.

But I also use several other pianos the church owns, older uprights in the other rooms. Those are completely inferior to either the grand OR my digital.

How many of us can afford the grand? How many of us are playing on a used spinet, or a clunky old upright? How many of us will never reach our potential because of that limitation, yet we're too snobbish to go try a digital?
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
#1138632 - 03/12/08 11:53 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
J. Mark Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/06
Posts: 1323
 Quote:
Originally posted by TimR:
How many of us can afford the grand? How many of us are playing on a used spinet, or a clunky old upright? How many of us will never reach our potential because of that limitation, yet we're too snobbish to go try a digital? [/b]
Now I think you're talking about a different set of issues. And that's not really the subject of this thread. I don't think anyone is being snobbish here. There is just a simple reality, that there are nuances and variances of tone and touch that a digital can not produce. That in no way implies that a digital can not be better than some old clunker spinet. I think people here have often recommended to those on a very limited budget that they should consider a digital over a craigslist clunker. (Hey, I think I invented a piano term!)

Top
#1138633 - 03/13/08 12:37 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
dpvjazz Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/12/05
Posts: 287
Loc: phoenix az
Piano techniques is your best bet and maybe spend some time with a classical teacher going over some simple but effective pieces to help you. I remember studying the Muzio Clementi sonatinas and sonatas and they have lots of dynamic markings and different tempos and if you practice them correctly that should help you get closer to your goals. Muzio Clementi (23 January 1752 – 10 March 1832) was a classical composer, and acknowledged as the first to write specifically for the piano. He is best known for his piano sonatas and his collection of piano studies
Clementi composed almost 110 piano sonatas. Some of the earlier and easier ones were reissued as sonatinas after the success of his Sonatinas Op. 36, and continue to be popular practice pieces in piano education. These are not often performed in public concerts, largely because they are seen as non-challenging educational music. However, most of Clementi's sonatas are more difficult to play than those of Mozart, who wrote in a letter to his sister that he would prefer her not to play Clementi's sonatas due to their jumped runs, and wide stretches and chords, (GREAT FOR JAZZ) which he thought might induce injury. Beethoven, however was a great admirer of the Clementi sonatas and their influence is very evident in his own piano compositions. DPVJAZZ
http://feeds2read.net/Rss-View/8770/Classical-and-blues-jazz-piano-techniques
http://www.webclassifieds.us/index/listings/page68120.htm
http://www.eatonhand.com/hw/facts.htm
http://eeshop.unl.edu/text/fingers.txt
http://esvc001419.wic024u.server-web.com/piano/default.htm
http://pianoeducation.org/pnotmi2.html
http://www.tadmusic.com/rsi2.html
http://piano-booklet-learning-systems-pbls.com/piano%20technique.html

Top
#1138634 - 03/13/08 03:31 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
swingal Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/31/05
Posts: 1094
Loc: England
I have joined this thread rather late, but to answer the question of the topic:-

I would say, if you wish to play the acoustic in the future and you can practice without disturbing the others in the house you will certainly develop the best touch that way by a million miles.

I have a digital keyboard which is tempting, used rarely, for silent practice but I know that I'm not at the touch fingering standard that my digital gives me to believe.

My acoustic is nearly new action, about 2 years old as the piano was totally rebuilt when purchased and is not over stiff as it has been properly regulated but none the less is not loose which many other pianos often are, when with worn action.

I have played an acoustic at a friend's house which is one of those mini pianos but its about 40 years old or more and has not been tuned for years and is in a damp room. The action is awful and really stiff. The owner is completely happy with it and plays the same sheet of music for ever.

I prefer any old upright that is loose to one like the mini upright above.

So yes,I would advise 100% to only use the digital when the acoustic is not available and do not be drawn into thinking, you will learn touch with it as you will not!

In fact any acoustic is better for fingering old and loose or not

Alan (swingal)

Top
#1138635 - 03/15/08 11:48 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
Secondo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/15/07
Posts: 312
Loc: Seattle, Washington
I am later than all of you to say something here, but my reading, for example of Artur Rubeinstein's life, led me to understand that the silent keyboard was used as a practice tool in those days when concert artists were traveling on trains, boats, etc., and it took a long time to get to their next concert destination. So, the silent keyboard afforded a means for practicing while away from a piano and on the road for any length of time.

As for touch, the fact that you are aware of this issue, means a lot and it will come. I have written this before elsewhere, but my teacher taught me to begin my exploration into touch by telling me to pretend that I was going through mud when playing the notes. I guess this idea helps you to start controlling how you play the notes.
_________________________
Baldwin SF-10 320152, Marshall & Wendell, Steinway B

Top
#1138636 - 03/16/08 12:02 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
hotkeys Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/12/07
Posts: 788
Loc: Massapequa, NY
I worked on my touch so that the sound of the piano would not travel to other rooms. Very difficult to do in an estate house where I was at for a seminar. The acoustics in the building are such that the sound travels from one end of the hall to the other. The challenge also is; if you touch too lightly, the hammer of the note you strike may not hit the string.

- Mark
_________________________
...The ultimate joy in music is the joy of playing the piano...

Top
#1138637 - 03/16/08 06:13 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
ktom Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/07/07
Posts: 212
Loc: Somerset UK
Just to confirm what secondo says - my grandfather was in the piano and concert business for around 70 years. He knew a lot of top professionals and had occasionally supplied silent keyboards. He told me they were used when touring so they could practise in hotel rooms etc. This doesnt mean nobody ever used one to develop touch, just that this was not their purpose. I think my grandad said a lot of the big piano manufacturers produced their own models. These were substantial bits of kit and I dont suppose lots were made. I have never seen one myself. One person I know didnt have one is Duke Ellington, 'cause on one tour he practised on my grandad's own piano (not that my grandad could play a note, paradoxically!). That model K is in the room here with me right now.. Since I got it 38 years ago, I have been hoping for some Ellington talent to soak back out of the keys into my fingers!.... nothing yet \:D !!!!
_________________________
Steinway K - Kurzweil PC 88(wrecked and sold for spares) - Yamaha S90 - rhodes 760 - korg wavestation- Hammond XK1 etc..

Top
#1138638 - 03/18/08 01:26 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
pianobuff Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/06
Posts: 1580
Loc: Pacific Northwest
I'm the latest thus far to chime in.

But my two cents are to the OP is make sure piano is well regulated first and foremost.

And gosh guys, Gyro isn't all that bad, I mean, he or she isn't mainstream? I mean Gyro does have a different perspective on most topics here which makes this forum, I think, somewhat colorful.

Anyways, maybe Gyro was trying to say the same thing perhaps. The fact that a digital piano does have an even touch, in other words it does not need regulation. It is what it is and very consistently at that.

The problem with digital pianos, imo, is that there is no live tone. Which takes touch to produce. Developing a nice and even touch with control of dynamics can only be developed with a good quality piano that is well tuned, evenly voiced and regulated.

Maybe this is why Gyro is saying practice on a digital. Because most pianos are not perfectly regulated, yet digitals are.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher,
member MTNA and Piano Basics Foundation

Top
#1138639 - 03/18/08 07:27 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by pianobuff:
The problem with digital pianos, imo, is that there is no live tone. Which takes touch to produce. [/b]
I don't think I can agree with either of those sentences.

I scanned back through all the posts in this thread to find out if the word "touch" was ever defined.

Nope. No problem, I'll do it.

Touch is simply a very precise ability to adjust how loud you play any given note.

That's all. But that's a lot, considering how many notes you may be playing at one time, etc.

The digital piano now has 127 levels of loudness available. That should be enough for most of us mortals.

Now, the exact effect on the tone can vary depending on the software. Cheap digitals may have the same sampled tone just supplied louder or softer, and that doesn't truly give the same effect as touch on an acoustic. But the high end digitals sample the acoustics at various levels of volume and they do pick up the differences in timbre that result.
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
#1138640 - 03/18/08 08:21 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
J. Mark Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/06
Posts: 1323
 Quote:
Originally posted by TimR:
Touch is simply a very precise ability to adjust how loud you play any given note.
[/b]
I don't think that's how I would define touch. To me, it is not just the "loudness" with which you play the note, it is also how you get that loudness, and what you do with it. The speed with which you approach the key. The speed with which you move away from the key. How it interacts with other aspects of your playing. And much more.

For example, do you attack the note quickly, or move into it slowly? What kind of voice are you trying to get with the note? My teacher has asked me to think of various instruments from an orchestra in playing a piece, and for example (in one piece) with a series of low bass notes he suggests I think of a bowed bass. So a series of bass notes with a sort of soft entry and exit, flowing together... not like a plucked bass, or even a bassoon. This requires a particular touch. I can't even approximate it on a digital, but I can "get it" on the acoustic.

I do think it is useful to try to define the concept we're talking about. I just would not define it so narrowly.

Top
#1138641 - 03/18/08 10:17 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
Touch is texture, not just loudness. It involves how one note blends into the next one, or doesn't blend, and the contrast between those notes. It is the creation of the colour or quality of a tone, how it starts, rings, dies down.

The digital piano has a built in colour and does not allow you to create or interact. There are no hammers that begin to give and swing that you are able to respond to, and no actual strings with the acoustic properties that physics has given them, nor is there wood and metal having vibrational properties spread three-dimensionally across a massive instrument.

It seems that the only thing you can control on a digital piano is loud, soft, and duration, and the rest is done for you. The very fact that an acoustic piano can reveal your uneven touch also means it will reveal other shades that you intentionally put in - something impossible in the digital due to its built in perfection and pre-conceived sound. It's kind of like homogenized milk from guernsey cows, versus the choice of unhomogenized choices of guernsey and rich creamy jersey mixed at will with a touch of goat. There is no richness of flavour or texture, and there are no surprises.

Top
#1138642 - 03/18/08 11:15 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
Diane... Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/16/06
Posts: 3443
Loc: Western Canada
Thought that touch was about putting each tone in their place.

What I mean is that the melody notes should be hear clearly over the harmony notes underneath it. And the bass notes controlled to be played softer. We've all probably hear this from our teachers over and over, but this simple strategy takes a lot of practice and listening to get this just right! Otherwise you get notes just blending all together.

Dynamics, dynamics, dynamics! Can't emphasis that word enough.

Most people play notes and can sound mechanical, but when emotion and feeling are put into the touch by putting the tones in their place, it ullimately draws emotion out of the listener and isn't that the goal!

Easy to play notes, but not so easy to play music!

Add perfect timing or some rubato to all this, and you've got music that touches you!
_________________________
http://www.pianoworld.com/Uploads/files/goldsparkledress.jpg
Diane
Jazz/Blues/Rock/Boogie Piano Teacher


Top
#1138643 - 03/18/08 11:32 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
J. Mark Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/06
Posts: 1323
 Quote:
Originally posted by Diane...:
Easy to play notes, but not so easy to play music! [/b]
Yup, and as you imply... easy to listen to music, not so easy to listen to notes.

Top
#1138644 - 03/18/08 11:42 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
 Quote:
Originally posted by J. Mark:
 Quote:
Originally posted by TimR:
Touch is simply a very precise ability to adjust how loud you play any given note.
[/b]
My teacher has asked me to think of various instruments from an orchestra in playing a piece, and for example (in one piece) with a series of low bass notes he suggests I think of a bowed bass. [/b]
Tim is right. Touch is only speed of key descent - nothing else. If thinking in terms of orchestral instruments helps your conception that's fine but you can't break the laws of physics.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1138645 - 03/18/08 11:43 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by J. Mark:
 Quote:
Originally posted by TimR:
Touch is simply a very precise ability to adjust how loud you play any given note.
[/b]
I don't think that's how I would define touch. To me, it is not just the "loudness" with which you play the note, it is also how you get that loudness, and what you do with it. [/b]
Commonly believed to be true, but in actual fact merely mythology.

In blind tests (single blind, obviously, no way to double blind this) sophisticated listeners are unable to tell the touch of a finger from the touch of a pencil eraser held between the teeth.

Loudness really is all there is. But as I've said, that is still a lot. And yes, the higher end digital software does capture the effect of other string resonances, etc.
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
#1138646 - 03/18/08 11:58 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
 Quote:
In blind tests (single blind, obviously, no way to double blind this) sophisticated listeners are unable to tell the touch of a finger from the touch of a pencil eraser held between the teeth.

Loudness really is all there is. But as I've said, that is still a lot. And yes, the higher end digital software does capture the effect of other string resonances, etc.
The one statement does not lead to the next. It is not what part of the body touches the instrument, but how the musician interacts physically with the instrument. That can be done with finger, hand, arm, pencil, or nose, if you can coordinate well enough.

Yes, the digital software captures some of the effects of string resonances in translation, but not the resonance that you want to create and not three-dimensionally.

Top
#1138647 - 03/18/08 12:02 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
Olek Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7424
Loc: France
Hello,

I only just can give my opinion and experience there.

To developp touch one need :
To know how to play relaxed (whole body) and with a good equilibrium posture, so he can use the weigh of the body, arm, shoulders, etc, and the force obtained with the forearm opening, the forearm opening along with the legs impulse, etc.

Biggest thing is neitherless to have some musical culture, and touch is realted to tone closely. SO to have a nice touch one need to have good imagination and memory of tones.

A very efficient method to developp touch is to play / work a Bach piece like a Praeludium or any piece that is not too difficult for your level, and paly it while imaginating textures such :
Rain
Snow
sand
dust
wapor
snow tempest
water
stones rolling in the water of a little river.

etc

Doing so you will develop your listening and the touch will be there because of your intention. If you don't obtain exactly what you are trying to that is not a problem because you are learning to understand what touch you are after, and recognize when you have it.

Don't hesitate to jump in the tone, even if you may probably hear nuances that exist at a lesser point to the auditory, to me that is the way to go, and I trained like that for a moment with very good results.

Prior doing so you can learn to "tame" the rythm and respiration of the music, reading the music while walking in rythm in the room.

The link between your body an soul and the music is of utmost importantce to developp touch.

Hope that helps

Musically,
_________________________
It is critical that you call your Senators and Representatives and ask them to cosponsor S. 2587 and H.R. 5052. Getting your legislators to cosponsor these bills


Top
#1138648 - 03/18/08 12:06 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
Olek Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7424
Loc: France
I apologize for my poor english, not my native language indeed.

All above apply for an accoustic piano by evidence.

I know at last one professional classical pianist that only have a GT1 to practice. When he may play in concert, he needs 3 days of work on an accoustic piano to be OK.

You can obtain certainly a little bit in touch on a Keyboard, but so many things are still missing that it may not be as "miracoulous" than with the real thing.

Best
_________________________
It is critical that you call your Senators and Representatives and ask them to cosponsor S. 2587 and H.R. 5052. Getting your legislators to cosponsor these bills


Top
#1138649 - 03/18/08 12:12 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
 Quote:
Originally posted by Kamin:


A very efficient method to developp touch is to play / work a Bach piece like Pareludium or any piec that is not too hard for your level, and paly it while imaginating textures such :
Rain
Snow
sand
dust
wapor
snow
water
stones rolling in the water of a little river.

etc


The link between your body an soul and the music is of utmost importance to develop touch.
[/b]
What refreshing thoughts!
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1138650 - 03/18/08 01:21 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
pianojazz Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/10/06
Posts: 359
Loc: dearborn, mi
One develops touch by listening - listening to those that have it, recognizing what it sounds like, and striving for that sound in your own playing.
_________________________
www.myspace.com/michaelbreenpiano

Top
#1138651 - 03/18/08 01:23 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
 Quote:
Originally posted by pianojazz:
One develops touch by listening - listening to those that have it, recognizing what it sounds like, and striving for that sound in your own playing. [/b]
No, it's finding your own voice.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1138652 - 03/18/08 01:35 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
.. and the composer's voice, kbk?

Top
#1138653 - 03/18/08 01:54 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
It's his/her words.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1138654 - 03/18/08 02:00 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
I think "touch" comes from wanting to find many ways to express the music you are playing. You have to notice there is something lacking in your playing, and follow through with
different "touches" to capture the sound as you imagine it can be.

Listening, selecting techniques, dynamics, articulation capture your attention. Technique is simply a word for "How-to". The more you know "How-to" the more choices you will have in your expressiveness.

If helps to have a teacher well versed in performance standards and the ability to teach the nuances and characteristics of certain composers.

Betty

Top
#1138655 - 03/18/08 02:34 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
 Quote:
Originally posted by keyboardklutz:
It's his/her words. [/b]
Like those of a playwright? In language words are never neutral, always require interpretation of intent. I guess you get a blend of the author's voice via his words, and your own as well as what the genre suggests. Um, touch plays into that somewhere.

Top
#1138656 - 03/18/08 04:43 PM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
Kamin,

Yes imagination is extremely helpful, as is colors of things, aromas, sights, feelings, searching one self for exaggerations that can enter into the music through you.

The deeper you can go within your self, I believe, the more expressive you can be, and you'll find the interpretation throught the combination of listening, your life's experiences, and your choice of emotional and physical reaction to the music on the piano.

From the composer's writings, characteristics, era, mood, style, and yourself as the instrument of interpreting his musical works.

Touch comes through motions and fingers, but it also comes from the heart and being of the musician who is the interpreter.

Betty

Top
#1138657 - 03/19/08 12:04 AM Re: How does one develop 'touch'?
John Citron Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/15/05
Posts: 3925
Loc: Haverhill, Massachusetts
There are some really good thoughts on this. Thank you Betty, PianoJazz, Kamin, and Keyboard Klutz. You were able to say what I was going to say.

I would like to add to this as well, if I may. You really want to play from your heart and really listen to your playing. I have found that when I am sight reading something, I'm not really hearing the music; I'm only hearing the piano make noise.

Having said this, when you play from your heart, you need to listen to yourself and one of the ways to do that is to sing the melody in your head prior to starting the piece, and then try to match what you hear in your playing.

While your playing, you also want to pay close attention to the shape of the phrases and make the most of them by emphasizing the peaks and valleys, and by making more of different harmonies and melodic lines that are not part of the main themes, but appear within the music by playing them louder or softer depending upon how they fit. One of my teachers taught me to think in other instruments. So when I play a Schubert Sonata, I think string quartet, or one of his piano trios which are similar to his sonatas, and I phrase the music accordingly. Bach keyboard works, as another example, are good for Baroque concerto grossi. I think about playing with different types of stacatto and different levels of legato so that the music speaks rather than yells.

Arm weight, balance, work well in controlling the balance between the hands and the overall dynamics. One of the things that a teacher showed me is to play softer than written. The reason is this gives you more leeway to phrase and stay within the dynamic range noted, and you also have bigger dynamic range so when you really need to get loud, there is still piano sound to get there without banging. For this you use your body/shoulder and arm behind the chords instead of just the fingers to produce a round full tone instead of a harsh brittle tone that the finger-only technique produces.

Don't expect instant results. I had these lessons more than 12 years ago, and it took me until about 3 years ago to just being to understand what he was saying.

John
_________________________
Nothing.

Top
Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 >

Moderator:  sharpsandflats 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
164 registered (accordeur, Abby Pianoman, 36251, Allard, 45 invisible), 1854 Guests and 18 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
75896 Members
42 Forums
156837 Topics
2304531 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
For Sale: PE-2 PIANO PEDAL EXTENDER
by TakomaRose
08/21/14 02:04 PM
How is this possible?
by kaanguner
08/21/14 02:03 PM
Questions About Piano Magic for Sheet Music Readers
by newbert
08/21/14 01:51 PM
Hammers and action parts selection for Mason and Hamlin
by Lyra
08/21/14 12:46 PM
Looking for SoCal retailers to try an RD-800 or MP7
by Delphian2001
08/21/14 12:19 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission