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#1239170 - 07/28/09 07:58 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: J Cortese]
ProdigalPianist Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/08/07
Posts: 1049
Loc: Phoenix Metro, AZ
Originally Posted By: J Cortese

I want to. No other reason. That's possibly the best thing about going back into it as an adult myself is that I don't have a chorus of adults asking me to justify every little damn thing anymore. "Because I just want to" is all anyone else needs to know....
...meaning, there's no point to my having something THEY like if THEY can't enjoy it.

Like hell. I like it. I'm the point.


OMG OMG OMG

3hearts thumb

Can I quote you in my sig line?????


"I'm the point"

PERFECT
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#1239190 - 07/28/09 08:39 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Ebony and Ivory]
J Cortese Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/20/09
Posts: 357
Loc: Los Angeles, CA
Originally Posted By: Ebony and Ivory
If you don't want to play for other people, that is 100% your decision. No one has the right to tell you that you *have* to play for other people in order to get enjoyment from it, or be successful at it.


The thing is ... someday, maybe I will. I have no clue. I can't predict the future. If I do, I do.

But I'm not going to aim for it or assume that it's going to be part of my life, or define myself as a failure if I don't. In my experience, with some people, if I admit that I might someday want to do X, they will take it as an excuse to shove me in that direction and justify it with, "Well, you SAID you would!"

The only thing I can do in that situation is put my foot down and make completely clear that the decision is mine and mine alone, and that if it happens, it happens, but I'm not going to try to control it. That's a bit zen for some people. :-)

Well, there's something else I can do in that situation, too. Avoid them. :-D But it really is just a matter of asserting ownership. If a teacher or anyone else suggests something that they can present as helpful or useful to me in my own quest, that's fine. That's what I want from an interaction with a teacher -- wholehearted creative assistance in getting me to where I want to go, and maybe some new possibilities along the way. To me, that is a "serious teacher."

But I don't want them to push their own agenda on me according to their definition of success, or to try any sneaky tactics to do it. With kids, this is also dangerous because they can sniff out when an adult is trying to wheedle them in about a millisecond. A kid that is on the obedient side will allow themselves to be shoved and molded and may well regret it later, and a kid that is more self-directed will kick back.

I guess that's just an argument for honesty, though. Be upfront with your students as to your own motivations, know thyself, and all that happy horsepoop ...

Again, the problem being that I don't know how much ownership a kid can assert or even should. Most of them are just so young to know where they may want to go, even if they think they do.


Edited by J Cortese (07/28/09 08:47 PM)
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#1239242 - 07/28/09 09:37 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: J Cortese]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: J Cortese
In a way, I think I've made some sort of shift in my own mentality toward being a Real Player, however you guys might define Serious Teacher. I think they work well together in some ways and are at loggerheads in others.


Believe in this: Serious Teachers DO want Real Players in their studios. It's just that Real Players are in short supply. Let's face it, where I live, the great majority of piano students take lessons because other people are doing it. It's a game of "keeping up with the Joneses."
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#1239244 - 07/28/09 09:41 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: AZNpiano]
eweiss Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 2393
Loc: Beautiful San Diego, CA
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
Let's face it, where I live, the great majority of piano students take lessons because other people are doing it. It's a game of "keeping up with the Joneses."

Orange County huh? I was just up in Laguna Beach. Not one music store on the whole 101 strip near there. Love the OC!
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#1239246 - 07/28/09 09:43 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: J Cortese]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: J Cortese
If a teacher or anyone else suggests something that they can present as helpful or useful to me in my own quest, that's fine. That's what I want from an interaction with a teacher -- wholehearted creative assistance in getting me to where I want to go, and maybe some new possibilities along the way. To me, that is a "serious teacher."


I agree with this part; however, how many young students are self-directed enough to be in their own quest? I've had students who wanted to play this piece or that piece, but they have no idea how much work is required to get there, and how much self-discipline is involved.
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#1239249 - 07/28/09 09:49 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: eweiss]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: eweiss
Orange County huh? I was just up in Laguna Beach. Not one music store on the whole 101 strip near there. Love the OC!


Not sure what you are implying. Please clarify.
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#1239250 - 07/28/09 09:52 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: AZNpiano]
Jennifer Eklund Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/16/09
Posts: 162
Loc: SoCal
Pretty sure he means there are no sheet music stores in the OC. I can only think of one that only sells sheet music.
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#1239274 - 07/28/09 10:29 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Jennifer Eklund]
Kreisler Offline


Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13789
Loc: Iowa City, IA
I think we're over-thinking things a bit. In my opinion, there is only one thing that makes piano teachers serious:

Their students can play the piano well.

It doesn't matter when, how often, where, or what they play. A serious piano teacher knows how to get their students to play well, and that includes recruiting and dismissing students that you are unable to work with effectively.

Some people will argue that last point, saying it's easy to look like a good teacher if you kick all the bad students out. But there are a lot of teachers who, if they kicked all their bad students out, wouldn't have any students left at all.

There's also a popular quote that I think applies:

"The enemy of great is good."

In other words, being great is about not settling for "good enough." The minute a teacher decides that their students are "good enough" and that their last recital "wasn't bad," they are not serious about being great.
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#1239278 - 07/28/09 10:34 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: AZNpiano]
eweiss Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 2393
Loc: Beautiful San Diego, CA
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
Originally Posted By: eweiss
Orange County huh? I was just up in Laguna Beach. Not one music store on the whole 101 strip near there. Love the OC!


Not sure what you are implying. Please clarify.

Ya, I meant I didn't see any sheet music stores or stores that sell pianos or other instruments. I hope there are some. I just didn't see any.
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#1239285 - 07/28/09 10:45 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: AZNpiano]
beccaY Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/06/09
Posts: 23
I have been teaching for about 8 years, but started when I was in college. I do not put my students in competitions or anything that includes students from other studios. We have 2 recitals through out the year. Once a month my students come to my house and they all play a piece from that week or a piece in progress. So I feel my kids get plenty of "stage" time. Does that mean I am not a serious teacher? I take teaching very seriously and I care tremendously about the progress of my students. In my area it takes a lot of money and time to enter kids in competitions. I have to be apart of several organizations which would cost me hundreds of dollars. That is something I am not able to do at this time. My prices are on the low side and I will be raising them this fall. Hopefully this will attract more serious students. How do I get my studio together with others to do a joint recital? I don't know any teachers in my area. How are you guys involved in the community as a music teacher and how do you get your students involved?

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#1239290 - 07/28/09 10:48 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Kreisler]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
In other words, being great is about not settling for "good enough." The minute a teacher decides that their students are "good enough" and that their last recital "wasn't bad," they are not serious about being great.



Thank you for that humbling insight.
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#1239297 - 07/28/09 10:54 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: beccaY]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: beccaY
How do I get my studio together with others to do a joint recital? I don't know any teachers in my area. How are you guys involved in the community as a music teacher and how do you get your students involved?


You should join MTNA or other professional organizations that offer programs, even if you think it's too expensive. Frankly, if I didn't join my state's MTA and allowed my students to participate in its many programs, I would feel like I'm cheating my students.

If you join a popular branch, then you have many opportunities to work with other piano teachers in your area, and more chances for joint recitals and other ventures. Best of luck to you!
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#1239323 - 07/28/09 11:22 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: AZNpiano]
J Cortese Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/20/09
Posts: 357
Loc: Los Angeles, CA
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
I agree with this part; however, how many young students are self-directed enough to be in their own quest? I've had students who wanted to play this piece or that piece, but they have no idea how much work is required to get there, and how much self-discipline is involved.


I agree totally, which is why I added:

"Again, the problem being that I don't know how much ownership a kid can assert or even should. Most of them are just so young to know where they may want to go, even if they think they do."

To some extent, a youngster does have to just trust the teacher, and the teacher has to understand that their chiefest function is to fill the student's toolbox so they can go on to build anything they want later -- when they know what they want. Which may take decades.

And even if the teacher explicitly tells them this, they may simply not be at the maturity level to understand it. It took me a looooong time.

Teaching kids is HARD ...


Edited by J Cortese (07/28/09 11:25 PM)
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#1239325 - 07/28/09 11:28 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Kreisler]
J Cortese Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/20/09
Posts: 357
Loc: Los Angeles, CA
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
There's also a popular quote that I think applies:

"The enemy of great is good."

In other words, being great is about not settling for "good enough." The minute a teacher decides that their students are "good enough" and that their last recital "wasn't bad," they are not serious about being great.


Maybe it's a matter of semantics. I'm not sure I agree with the implication that there is always "greatness" to be pursued, and that it's a linear progression. Perhaps I'd simply say the same thing, but only phrase it as: "Good enough doesn't mean there isn't more fun stuff out there to learn, try, and do." I think the enemy of great is boredom.

I don't think that if I do manage to develop something to reflect a messa di voce that it will make me more "great." But I do think that it will be fun, and I'm sure that if I keep attentive in life, there will be something else fun to learn and contemplate around the next corner. One should never stop exploring.

It's just a preference in phrasing, though.


Edited by J Cortese (07/28/09 11:29 PM)
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#1239329 - 07/28/09 11:37 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Kreisler]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11688
Loc: Canada
May I propose the following:
Student: We are in a state of becoming and teachers are developing us - or better said, helping us develop.

Teacher: A serious teacher is dedicated to doing a good job. He'll make sure that he has the necessary abilities which I imagine is knowledge of the instrument, how to play it, and how to teach. If he's weak in any of these, he'll be seeking to improve them. He'll know what kinds of goals to set for his students, and what to do to reach them. That reaching is the job of both teacher and student so he'll be planning how to guide the student for his part too.

Whether or not there are competitions or recitals depends on whether they are needed for the student to ultimately achieve. If students need performance opportunities in order to grow properly as musicians, then if they're missing there's a problem - otherwise not. What are the goals? In general, are you reaching your milestones, is there improvement?

To some degree you also need to appear to be serious teachers. Certificates are visible proof of self-improvement, while you could also be growing professionally without getting a piece of paper for it - but who will know? A student doing well in recitals is something tangible that can be seen of your work. I would differentiate, though. Certificates could be collected as a kind of promotion. Students could be honed for recitals while the less interesting skills they need to acquire get neglected for the sake of looking good.

Is it possible that the most important achievements of a serious teacher are the ones that are least obvious?

I take issue with the idea that if performance is not taking place, the teacher is automatically not serious - and I would especially take issue if this means competitions. Again, what is the goal and is it necessary for the student's growth? It's not about how you appear, but how we develop. What if the student's circumstance is such that performance is not indicated at that time? I would think that the teacher who pushes something that is unnecessary or even counter-indicated is not serious and might even be irresponsible. Isn't the serious teacher the one who acts to benefit the growth of each student, and knows how to do so?

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#1239491 - 07/29/09 08:58 AM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: keystring]
Ebony and Ivory Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/14/05
Posts: 1179
Loc: Minnesota
Originally Posted By: keystring
Isn't the serious teacher the one who acts to benefit the growth of each student, and knows how to do so?

KS that is perfect. Not to say no one else had good points, there are many in this thread.
I believe that in order to be "serious" one needs to realize that there is no set "curriculum" if you will, and each student, whether 5, 15 or 50 will come with his own set of challenges, wants and ultimate goals.

It IS different with children. Sometimes they do need to be "pushed" to do things, becuase they haven't had enough life to decide what they like yet. There are kids that I will push into doing recitals. I would never push an adult into one.

There was a poster awhile back that had an elderly lady, 70 I think, and she came in knowing what she wanted to do. She wanted to play. That's all. Not learn theory, do competions, etc...did that teacher become less of a teacher for allowing that? In my opinion, NO! She became MORE of a teacher becuase she was open to see what her student wanted.

I think we can all agree that it is challenging, but very rewarding, to teach piano (or any instrument). Unlike most teachers, we don't have a set age for our students.
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#1239548 - 07/29/09 10:44 AM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: beccaY]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7368
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: beccaY
How do I get my studio together with others to do a joint recital? I don't know any teachers in my area. How are you guys involved in the community as a music teacher and how do you get your students involved?


You don't tell us where you live - it may be on a ranch in central Montana. But assuming you live in a somewhat populated area, chances are, there are other piano teachers. If so, see if there's an MTNA chapter. You can use the web to find out. If necessary, email your state chapter and ask. If there isn't why not start one?

Is there a music store? If there is, I'll bet they know at least some of the other teachers.

Recitals don't have to be with just piano teachers. We combine voice, strings and piano (strangely, none of the wind teachers choose to join in).

Keep your eyes open. When you see a kid head for the piano and actually play something (in church, in a store, or where ever) ask them who their teacher is.

Just a few starter ideas for you.
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"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
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#1239561 - 07/29/09 11:19 AM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Kreisler]
Barb860 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/09
Posts: 1646
Loc: northern California
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
I think we're over-thinking things a bit. In my opinion, there is only one thing that makes piano teachers serious:

Their students can play the piano well.

It doesn't matter when, how often, where, or what they play. A serious piano teacher knows how to get their students to play well, and that includes recruiting and dismissing students that you are unable to work with effectively.

Some people will argue that last point, saying it's easy to look like a good teacher if you kick all the bad students out. But there are a lot of teachers who, if they kicked all their bad students out, wouldn't have any students left at all.

There's also a popular quote that I think applies:

"The enemy of great is good."

In other words, being great is about not settling for "good enough." The minute a teacher decides that their students are "good enough" and that their last recital "wasn't bad," they are not serious about being great.


The above post is very thought-provoking for me. I have been teaching beginners since 1991 and considered myself to be a "good teacher". This thread, along with a book I'm half-way through, "A Piano Teachers's Legacy" by Richard Chronister (teachings of Frances Clark), and this post in particular, make me realize I have lots of work to do to ever be a good teacher. I have 15 students in my studio and 10 are little boys under age 10. They don't practice enough, parents don't monitor their progress at home, and they don't play well. Ugh. I have work to do. Thanks for the insight here everyone.
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#1239615 - 07/29/09 12:51 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Barb860]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7368
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Barb, thanks for you post. We're not here to criticize teachers, but each of us are learning from each other. Unfortunately, some are too quick to take offense when none is intended.

In my original post on this subject, I mentioned something about my expectations, as a teacher, of the student and the support from the family. I suspect that if you peel away the varnish, you'll find every serious teacher has spoken or unspoken expectations which they insist on from student and family. Thus, they get results. This doesn't mean dictatorial methods, hitting students' fingers with rulers, etc. (we all know the horror stories). When expectations are high, results generally follow.

It appears that you've suddenly just become a more serious teacher. Congratulations!
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Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
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#1239651 - 07/29/09 01:24 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Lollipop Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 820
Loc: Georgia
No offense taken, and none intended. I'm a newbie here, so perhaps my questions and comments will show a bit of chutzpah on my part. By some of the definitions here I am not a serious piano teacher. I'm okay with that, but I sense the implication that peope like me should just go away. Can I take a stand for the little guy?

I teach only beginners, many of them difficult or non-traditional students. I have taught intellectually and/or emotionally challenged students, I have plenty of students who come from non-musical homes and backgrounds where they get limited support and only mild interest, I have taught adults who are working on their bucket lists. I have more than my share of students who squeeze piano in among soccer, Girl Scouts, Day Care, etc. None of my students would pass the smell test of "playing the piano well." (At least according to MY definition of well.) But my students are not an end result - they're in progress.

I have taught merely a couple students who I felt had a true combination of talent, intelligence, and work ethic.

The reason I am comfortable with this variety of students is because I believe there is something in making music that should be available to everyone, not just the stars. I think we are losing hoards of children to 2-chord rock music and monotone songs because they see anything beyond rhythm and volume as "too hard." I think we give up on kids too soon. Not everyone gets it the first time, and I love being there when that light bulb finally goes on!

My goal is not to put a student on the stage as much as it is to put them in the audience - loving and understanding the sounds, and feeling part of it, and responding to it. If they do end up on stage, I'd like to believe I had a part in sparking the passion.

I DO appreciate the "serious" (or ambitious, or strict, or "master") music teachers who are able to take students to great heights. Two of my three children are pursuing music performance careers (the other was an "Outstanding Performer" on piano, but ended up as a government economist...Can't win 'em all.) They wouldn't be there without the teachers who knew when and how to push. But with my kids, those teachers didn't come till later. They started out with beloved encouragers, hand-holders, people who saw them as individuals, not products or paychecks, and gently coaxed the music out of them.

I think I'm serious. I'm just maybe serious about different things?

Anyway, I appreciate the discussion, and it's offered plenty to think about.
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#1239739 - 07/29/09 03:20 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Lollipop]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7368
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: Lollipop
No offense taken ..... but I sense the implication that people like me should just go away.


Hummmm....sounds to me like you might be offended just a wee, little bit. shocked

Anyway, what makes this forum fun for me, at least, is the wide ranging perspectives that teachers (and some students, lest we forget) offer up.
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Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
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#1239752 - 07/29/09 03:34 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Lollipop]
ProdigalPianist Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/08/07
Posts: 1049
Loc: Phoenix Metro, AZ
I did not "compete" as a kid, but did participate in what we called "state music contest" and "auditions" (where students are judged but not ranked). As a returning adult, I have not yet found this type of venue in which to participate but would consider it if it were an option.

The good thing about high standards and the above type of "competition" (I would not be so enthused about an actual competition where there were winners and rankings) is that it gets students from a variety of teachers to "bring their A game". That's good if the other students can listen and be inspired and believe that if they work at it they can play that well too.

It's not so good if the other students are completely discouraged. I have had my share of teachers who didn't know How to help a student reach an A game, or to play at anywhere near the best of their ability. In fact, it wasn't until I was an adult that I learned that the quality of teaching mattered. My parents, who knew nothing about music lessons, really thought that if I was "any good" that I'd just be able to sit down at a piano (any piano) and play well. Having a competent teacher and an instrument that wasn't junk shouldn't matter.

By some definitions of the term, a "serious" teacher is someone who would be, by the standards of most teachers on this board, simply competent to teach piano. Sadly, in some places that's a big deal and hard to find. For others a "serious" teacher is someone who can help them get into a top conservatory or win the Van Cliburn.

I think there are many good and valid types of "serious". But what we should all be able to agree on is that *incompetent* teachers do damage to students and other teachers alike.
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#1239786 - 07/29/09 04:18 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: ProdigalPianist]
J Cortese Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/20/09
Posts: 357
Loc: Los Angeles, CA
Originally Posted By: ProdigalPianist
I think there are many good and valid types of "serious". But what we should all be able to agree on is that *incompetent* teachers do damage to students and other teachers alike.


And that each student may need a different type of "serious" teacher. One might be shy enough that a recital would kill their desire to learn. One might need the push and benefit from it. One might be competitive and enjoy it. One might work well with a teacher that provides a VERY structured framework, and one might work better with someone who is a bit freer and improvisational.

I think perhaps a "serious" teacher is one that understands this and realizes that there isn't one way to teach piano, although there are commonalities. Maria Callas once said that a singer should be able to sing anything; she made the comment that no one would permit a pianist to say something like, "I'm sorry, I don't do trills." Teaching is the same thing; you've got to have multiple tools in YOUR box as well instead of just one way of doing it. And you've got to pursue different techniques in teaching with as much eagerness and enthusiasm as you would like your students to pursue new techniques and discoveries in their playing.
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#1239789 - 07/29/09 04:19 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Barb860 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/09
Posts: 1646
Loc: northern California
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Barb, thanks for you post. We're not here to criticize teachers, but each of us are learning from each other. Unfortunately, some are too quick to take offense when none is intended.

In my original post on this subject, I mentioned something about my expectations, as a teacher, of the student and the support from the family. I suspect that if you peel away the varnish, you'll find every serious teacher has spoken or unspoken expectations which they insist on from student and family. Thus, they get results. This doesn't mean dictatorial methods, hitting students' fingers with rulers, etc. (we all know the horror stories). When expectations are high, results generally follow.

It appears that you've suddenly just become a more serious teacher. Congratulations!


Yes, perhaps I'm a "serious" and "not good" piano teacher, at least in my mind crazy So that means a "serious no good piano teacher" laugh
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Piano Teacher

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#1239850 - 07/29/09 05:17 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Barb860]
Chris H. Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/05
Posts: 2911
Loc: UK.
Anyone who takes the job seriously is a serious piano teacher.
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Pianist and piano teacher.

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#1239870 - 07/29/09 05:29 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Barb860]
Ebony and Ivory Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/14/05
Posts: 1179
Loc: Minnesota
Originally Posted By: Barb860
"serious no good piano teacher" laugh


Are you a "serious no good piano teacher" or a

"Serious? No? Good! Piano teacher" or maybe it's just

"Serious! No good piano, teacher!"
_________________________
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#1239919 - 07/29/09 06:46 PM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Ebony and Ivory]
Minaku Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/26/07
Posts: 1226
Loc: Atlanta
There are so many posts in this thread, my head is spinning. I agree that there is a certain standard that needs to be set, an expectation that should never be lowered in order to get our students to fulfill the potential we see in them.

It blows my mind that there are teachers that do not do recitals. My studio has a minimum of two studio recitals a year, as well as festival competitions. I'm slowly getting into Guild, and it's possible that some of my students would be interested in participating in the ABRSM exams. I find that without a recital, practice goes down. Nothing makes practice more streamlined and efficient than last-minute panic, eh? Also: recitals are NOT optional in my studio. Everyone must go. They may not be able to make one or two, but at some point everyone will play in a recital, and not just one piece, either. Two pieces must be played.

There are people who play because they love to play and not perform. When it comes to kids, these types are very rare. The impetus for performance, self-discipline, logical thinking, and self-scrutiny must come from the teacher.
_________________________
Pianist and teacher with a 5'8" Baldwin R and Clavi CLP-230 at home.

New website up: http://www.studioplumpiano.com. Also on Twitter @QQitsMina

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#1240148 - 07/30/09 02:30 AM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Minaku]
trillingadventurer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/28/08
Posts: 304
Loc: San Diego
For the record!

I have two recitals a year in which all of my students are required to participate in. In some respects I view each lesson as a little mini step/rehearsal towards the recital. It's when we all step up on that stage and say, "Here I am." The piano (as it turns out) is a great ring master for a grand group performance.

At the last recital my 5 year old daughter danced to a Chopin Prelude while my husband improvised alongside on his electric guitar.

I want to bring more than just music into people's lives. I want to wake them and up, push them to look within and share with me what is there.
_________________________
M. Katchur

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#1240177 - 07/30/09 04:24 AM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: trillingadventurer]
Boira Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/09/07
Posts: 472
Loc: Barcelona
What if it's the student who doesn't want to perform publicly? That'd make the teacher less serious? Or the student him/herself less commited?

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#1240818 - 07/31/09 09:00 AM Re: The Serious Piano Teacher [Re: Boira]
beccaY Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/06/09
Posts: 23
Thanks for the suggestions! I live in Edmond, OK, less than a mile away from University of Central Oklahoma. Our state has a MTNA chapter but it is so expensive and you have to join another organization in order to do the other. I got online and was going to join but could not bring my self to do it. The website is terrible first of all and very confusing. I did get in contact with the president and we emailed a few times, but I can never go to the meetings because they are during the day. I work during that time so... I do know one other teacher and she would not do a recital with me because she thought it would be too long. I have always wanted to add some variety to my recitals but don't know who to contact about that. I guess I just need to be more active in perusing this if I want it to happen.

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