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#1246905 - 08/10/09 06:47 PM I had an odd studio interview today..
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
Hello all,
I had a studio interview with a transfer student today. I like to take these things casually, as in the past I had a very sensitive potential transfer student practically cry at our interview, she hated the thought of having a new teacher just that much. frown

In our phone conversation with today's family, I'd asked the Mom what types of material her daughter was playing. She mentioned "Fingerpower" and "Hanon". This is usually the last thing I hear when I ask this question. I like Hanon, but I was asking about repertoire.. I asked if she were using a method book (she's been playing 3 years). I was told that she works with the Michael Aaron method. I've heard of this, but don't know it very well. I asked the student and parent to bring the method book to our interview, just for a frame of reference for me.

When they came, they didn't bring the method book, and the student played a brilliant Hanon #7. Lovely technique, nice solid rhythm, played at a nice mezzo forte. I just was stunned that the student brought no repertoire. I just didn't know what to make of this.. I can't wait until the lesson, when hopefully, she brings her method book, but I just thought that was odd not to bring it.

This will be a very interesting situation for me. They are switching because after 3 years, the family has developed a personal relationship with the other teacher and they'd like to try someone new.. and objective. The student is 11 years old, does not like to perform, has not played in a recital and when I asked her to play something she loves playing, she played Hanon. I wanted to get a feel for her sensitivity, so I asked her to add some basic dynamics to her Hanon..crescendo/decrescendo..and they both sounded exactly the same.

The parent also said things that make me realize that the student is not the best reader. Mom says that often, the student will play the songs differently than they're written, and that the other teacher will often say, "you added a few notes here and there, didn't you?" . The student told me herself that she wants to read better. I just thought.. "hmmmmm....". I decided against having her sightread, but I did try to ascertain from the two of them just exactly what their goals are. I think we've developed a plan we can all be happy about, but I just can't get over someone playing Hanon for me. I can get why this student might like Hanon.. once you get the first measure under your belt, you can play it without reading, etc..but jeez.. Hanon?

What would you all have thought about this?
BevP

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#1246910 - 08/10/09 07:08 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Bev, several thoughts come to mind.

About students not bringing current music: I have found that I really need to stress this with the parent. I explain that there are so many different approaches to learning a musical instrument, that reviewing the music the student has used will cut weeks, if not months, off of future lessons. When I contact them the day before the interview, to reconfirm (I'll bet many of you know why this is!), I remind them to please locate the old music now and make certain to bring it tomorrow. Some students still forget, of course, but at least you've tried.

About sight reading. I believe this is a must. How else are you going to determine where the student is in her reading ability? You may want to find a very easy repertoire book and preface the exercise with apologies for being so easy, but you don't want them to stress out while you're checking their reading skills.

From what I've heard others mention, the Aaron method is rather aggressive, and it may be too much so for this young lady. I will often put them into a series like Piano Town (others are fine, too) to "review" concepts, making sure there are no gaping holes in their background. If you get this right, they can probably get through the lower level in two or three months, review and reinforce old concepts, and then move on to the next level, feeling good about themselves.

I did this with a HS student last fall. Mom was a bit concerned that he was playing "easier" music than with his previous teacher. I explained that for the first time, he was playing musically, technically correctly, and the sense of pride he had and showed was quite rewarding for both of us. "Oh," she said!

Good luck - keep us posted.

John
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1246924 - 08/10/09 07:48 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5421
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
About sight reading. I believe this is a must. How else are you going to determine where the student is in her reading ability? You may want to find a very easy repertoire book and preface the exercise with apologies for being so easy, but you don't want them to stress out while you're checking their reading skills.


But what do you do if the student's sight reading level is several levels below his repertoire level?
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#1246945 - 08/10/09 08:33 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: AZNpiano]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
We work primarily on sight reading then!

Ideally, the sight reading level should be only 1 level lower than the repertoire. If it's a greater gap than that, I tell them what we're going to work on (S.R.), but they will also have some repertoire that is quite short but still at the level at which they are used to working.

I tend to use books that don't have a level number on them for these kinds of students, what you might traditionally consider supplementary repertoire. If it doesn't have a level number on it, they are more receptive to it.
_________________________
B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#1247025 - 08/10/09 11:56 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Minniemay]
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
Am I detecting that the parent or the child or both might not be paying attention to your requests of what to bring to the interview? Or, were they selectively avoiding doing so?

I would be cautious to make sure the teacher they are leaving has been informed of their departure and that all ends have been tied up to the teacher's satisfaction.

After 3 years with the same teacher, I would expect this young lady to have several things in memory to play for you, have some books available that she can easily thumb through and play for you. If I were meeting this child, I would have pulled out some pieces of music and played them for her and asked which ones she liked hearing. Then I would have put the open book in front of her open to the choice she liked and asked her to read through it for me.

I just hate when transfer students are reluctant to divulge who they are musically at this date. It puts all the onus for future success on you. I think a teacher taking on a transfer student of undetermined abilites is at a disadvantage until you can really "see" and "hear" where she is at.

If you discussed fees and your policy was it agreeable to them?

I would want to know that they were enthusiastic about the move and would apply their energies to participating whole heartedly. This might have been what I would call a "fuzzy" interview where enough communication about your future together might still need to be established.

It's really hard to communicate with a student who doesn't have their music materials and past assignment notebooks with them.

I wish you the best!

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#1247026 - 08/10/09 11:57 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Minniemay]
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
Am I detecting that the parent or the child or both might not be paying attention to your requests of what to bring to the interview? Or, were they selectively avoiding doing so?

I would be cautious to make sure the teacher they are leaving has been informed of their departure and that all ends have been tied up to the teacher's satisfaction.

After 3 years with the same teacher, I would expect this young lady to have several things in memory to play for you, have some books available that she can easily thumb through and play for you. If I were meeting this child, I would have pulled out some pieces of music and played them for her and asked which ones she liked hearing. Then I would have put the open book in front of her open to the choice she liked and asked her to read through it for me.

I just hate when transfer students are reluctant to divulge who they are musically at this date. It puts all the onus for future success on you. I think a teacher taking on a transfer student of undetermined abilites is at a disadvantage until you can really "see" and "hear" where she is at.

If you discussed fees and your policy was it agreeable to them?

I would want to know that they were enthusiastic about the move and would apply their energies to participating whole heartedly. This might have been what I would call a "fuzzy" interview where enough communication about your future together might still need to be established.

It's really hard to communicate with a student who doesn't have their music materials and past assignment notebooks with them.

I wish you the best!

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#1247141 - 08/11/09 09:07 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Betty Patnude]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
Wow, I certainly welcome the feedback!

Betty, you raise a very interesting point.. about whether the parent or the child didn't pay attention, or chose not to bring the repertoire. Really interesting point, and I have no answer for that atm. But it does make me think.

I agree that our future together may be "fuzzy". I think this might be a trial period for both parties. Not that it was mentioned that way specifically, but that was the impression I got from Mom. So, I'm aware of that going in. My gut feeling is that the daughter is apathetic about continuing, but Mom really wants her to continue. Perhaps they both agreed to "give it a shot"... and I'm fine with that, really. Who knows whether a different teacher might spark some serious interest with this particular student?

John,
I agree with you that sightreading is a must, but in my interviews right now, I just want to get a feel for the student and if I'm able to create rapport. Most parents who come to my studio are surprised that I insist on meeting them first. In my own experience, the personality and teaching style of the teacher is really very important. I've had some teachers whom I couldn't stand and that definitely affected my attitude towards lessons. I think it's very important to see if it's a good fit both ways. If she comes to lessons, I will most definitely get a feel for her sightreading at the lesson. But in a situation like this one, where I was told that the daughter is somewhat ambivalent, I didn't want to put her on the spot with sightreading.


Do both of you suggest that I call her former teacher?

BevP

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#1247198 - 08/11/09 10:43 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Bev, my interviews are generally comprehensive enough that I don't need to call the previous teacher. However, I've had a few students where I felt it prudent to discuss the student with the previous teacher, and have done so.

Musicians are expected to read at sight, just as students must be able to read orally and to themselves. We simply have to teach it. When a 5th grade classroom teacher gets a student who reads at the 2nd grade level, they immediately set about developing a plan to get that student reading up to grade level. Should we do less?
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1247221 - 08/11/09 11:16 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3156
Loc: Virginia, USA
It's the students that need a different approach that help the teacher grow, and this might be one such child! Hee, hee.

We're short a lot of facts, so speculation is dangerous, and therefore - since this is the internet - mandatory. <g>

One is that we don't know yet whether you were talking to the parent or the child. Is it the child who "forgot" to bring the method book, or the mom who sabotaged that effort?

The other is the child played Hanon. I.e., she played something with which she is thoroughly familiar and can rattle off with confidence. But she did not play anything that might have exposed a weakness, nor bring a method book from which you might have selected something that would expose a weakness. And add to that the statement that she doesn't do performances or recitals. We may be seeing a picture of an overly perfectionist or overly scared student. (Or, unfortunately, Mom; at this point we can't tell)

When you asked her to add expression to something she could perform fluently, she didn't do so. Why? Not necessarily because she doesn't understand the skill, though that may be the case. Possibly because she will not allow herself to show failure in front of an authority figure. She may have simply ignored your instructions and played it in a way that was safe for her.

I am suggesting that one interpretation of this interview is that this is a child who does not feel safe and desparately needs to. That's reaching a bit based on limited info, but if even close it implies you're going to have to approach criticism and correction in a delicate manner.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#1247224 - 08/11/09 11:18 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: TimR]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11561
Loc: Canada
Or it may reflect how she was taught and the previous teacher's expectations. How could one know as a student and parent that other "ways" exist? Maybe Hanon and exercises is what they "did". (?)

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#1247227 - 08/11/09 11:27 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: keystring]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3156
Loc: Virginia, USA
Could be.

How could we tell the difference?

There might be a clue in this line: that the other teacher will often say, "you added a few notes here and there, didn't you?"

Doesn't that sound like someone going overboard trying to be gentle? And doesn't it seem likely it was phrased that way for this specific child?

Why didn't the OP test her on sightreading? I'll bet Bev normally does. But something was setting off subtle alarm bells in her mind. And something lead her to post this.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#1247266 - 08/11/09 12:37 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
The reason that I posted was I (as a beginning teacher, mind you) thought it was odd that a student would bring Hanon as evidence of how they play. Why just a technical exercise, rather than repertoire? And her answer, "I like playing this.."
wow.

I really wonder whether the other teacher is aware that the student is considering leaving. I wouldn't call him, I simply wondered whether that was something that any of you would do in this instance.

As for sightreading, most of my students are beginners, and have never played before. The student I interviewed yesterday was only the 2nd one I've had who was a transfer.

John, ITA about sightreading. I just didn't think that in this particular instance that it would be a great idea to put the student on the spot. There's just something about this situation that is causing me to tread lightly..especially with the Mom saying to me that, "I bet if I asked her right now, she'd say she doesn't want to continue playing piano"..

We are all just speculating about what the situation actually is with this student. Next week, when she comes for her lesson, I'll know better, and ask her to sightread. Hopefully, she'll bring repertoire. If she doesn't, I have plenty of things here to start with..

BevP

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#1247275 - 08/11/09 12:51 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3158
Originally Posted By: BSP
The reason that I posted was I (as a beginning teacher, mind you) thought it was odd that a student would bring Hanon as evidence of how they play. Why just a technical exercise, rather than repertoire? And her answer, "I like playing this.."


I am sure she was insecure, and played Hanon because she felt comfortable playing it.

That she could play it well speaks volumes about how she could also play repertoire if taught.

I for one would rejoice if a transfer student knew anything whatsoever about technique; and if they knew and demonstrated good technique, plus proper execution of technique exercises, i would have to pinch myself to see if I wasn't dreaming.

I consider technique, and therefore the willingness to develop it via exercises as the bedrock foundation of good playing...a student can always learn theory, music history, etc, but good technique provides the physical ability to actually play repertoire.
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

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#1247279 - 08/11/09 12:54 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: rocket88]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
I loved the way she played it. And, it made me wonder if she was too "in her head", so to speak. More of a thinker, I mean. She's also an artist.. takes private art lessons. Perhaps that will be the way she chooses her creative expression, through art rather than music. Who knows?

I really am looking forward to our lesson.. and you know I'll post on how it went!!
BevP

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#1247408 - 08/11/09 05:12 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: BSP
I really wonder whether the other teacher is aware that the student is considering leaving. I wouldn't call him, I simply wondered whether that was something that any of you would do in this instance.


We all have students who leave us - at some point in time. Common decency dictates that the student (or parent) inform the teacher of the departure. No explanations are necessary, but always appreciated.

If I sense that a prospective transfer hasn't told their teacher about their impending departure, I ask the student point blank to do so, and to let me know when they have. Then I call the teacher in question a few days later, to let them know.

There are quite a few teachers who are not so considerate. Such is life.


Originally Posted By: BSP
John, ITA about sightreading. I just didn't think that in this particular instance that it would be a great idea to put the student on the spot. There's just something about this situation that is causing me to tread lightly..especially with the Mom saying to me that, "I bet if I asked her right now, she'd say she doesn't want to continue playing piano".. BevP


Bev, as you gain experience, you'll find ways to tell the student to do things which don't result in putting them on the spot. One such technique is to say up front, "This isn't a test. There's no right answer. I just need to find out where you're at in your note reading skills, so I can tailor your lessons appropriately." Someone playing Hanon can probably read at least at an early elementary level, say level one in most method or repertory books. Start there and work up, rather than work down from difficult to easy.
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1247452 - 08/11/09 06:46 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
I appreciate your advice, John.
Cheers!
BevP

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#1247572 - 08/11/09 10:16 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
BSP asked: "Do both of you suggest that I call her former teacher?"

Do you know the former teacher or would this be a cold call?

I think because of the "weak" interview on the student's part I would consider doing so. It could provide interesting information about the student or about the teacher if you get cooperation from the teacher too. But, mostly, the issue of ethics is what I would be concerned about - perhaps the teacher is expecting this student back in September and the ties have not been severed. I believe we have some allegiance due to fellow teachers what we are going to be seeing again and again in the music community and when teachers exchange information about a previous student transferring we can get a good picture of what transpired and where things were left off.

As you said, this was your second transfer student, so the things I'm suggesting to consider will be new to new. Information is an important thing to have when we are working with a transfer student and I really feel you didn't find out much about her because she was not disclosing. Perhaps the lessons with you will build her confidence in ways that she has not been exposed to yet. I consider the first 10 lessons of a beginner or of a transfer student to be a getting acquainted period. I love having their "old" music available and their assignment book because that, along with the lesson being conducted each time, provides you with the information you would want to know. Not to have that is making the teacher work harder to come up with lesson plans that will be appropriate for the student as well as good choices for her satisfaction and enjoyment.

Do you have a questionnaire that asks questions of the new prospective student that they would bring to interview? Something paper oriented would be helpful to you. Of course, not everyone is interested in filling out more forms! A few questions of the right kind could be very relevant. And, that could be exchanged by email before interviewing. Some of my most questionable interviews have been when they have presented no track record, no music, no assignment book, and even, get this, not remembering the name of their music teaching, and being vague about how long they studied.

Again, I wish you well in moving ahead. This is how we learn to conduct our businesses through our learning experiences with our interviews and new students - beginners or transfers - any age - any level.

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#1251807 - 08/19/09 08:36 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Betty Patnude]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
Hi all,
just wanted to give an update on my puzzling student. We had our first formal lesson, one that I considered an assessment.
We only had 1/2 hour, she said she had done all of her scales, so I asked her to start with G major. She'd been playing 2 octaves, h.t. She brought out her scale book, started on the G in a different register than what was written. uh - oh! Tone was good, but that fingering was questionable. Mom interjected "watch her, she likes to invent her own fingering.." Also, she didn't remember which black key to play. I began correcting, h.s., she displayed a lot of frustration.
I asked her to play the last piece she learned, which was about a level 2 Faber (the only thing I can compare it to). She probably was very nervous, and rusty. There were several reading errors. This piece, too was in G major. In her method book, the Michael Aaron, the piece immediately preceding this was written in the key of C minor. When she struggled playing it h.t., I offered her the option of just doing the r.h. She refused, "I can do it".. she did, but ...not very well, at all.
When do you all start Hanon? I ask because I find it has a high n.p.s.i. (notes per square inch). It's hard to read, especially for a student who has reading issues. I'm guessing that she learned her previous Hanon studies by rote. We just reviewed 2 measures.
My gut feeling is that this student will not continue. I sense a lot of frustration, and I know she doesn't trust me yet. She's a pre-teenager, and presents as... sullen, disinterested. I'm trying to think of a strategy should she continue with me.
This is a really interesting case...I wonder where we'll wind up..
Is it too early to follow up with Mom?

thanks,
Bev

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#1251812 - 08/19/09 08:43 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3158
You might be interested in "Junior Hanon". which has the first 20 exercises, plus scales, etc.

Its advantage is that the type has been reset, and the notes are spread out more, plus it starts an octave higher with the rh, all of which make it easier to read for beginners.

Here is a link:

http://www.amazon.com/Junior-Hanon-Alfre...5669&sr=1-4
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

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#1251853 - 08/19/09 10:31 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: rocket88]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Those 6th - 9th grade years can be pure hell for teachers. We feel your pain!

Hanon is too advanced for this young lady. At age 11, I' wondering if she's still in 6th grade, going into 7th in the fall? Her social needs weigh heavy, as she's going through huge physical and hormonal changes. You'll probably need a different approach with her.

A couple of suggestions. Try having a heart to heart discussion with her without mom in the room. This may or may not work. I'm letting one girl coast going on two years now, in hopes that as she reaches high school, she'll outgrow this and show some signs of personal maturity and we can get on with lessons.

Does she want to play the piano? Is she willing to spend 30 min or so every day so that she can learn and get good at it? Does she have a favorite song or piece that she wants to be able to play some day? Would she share that with you?

It sounds like your student has little grasp of fundamentals. You might consider finding a different method set, and starting in on level two, especially the performance book, or find a repertoire series at the same level.

About scale fingering. With some students, I use the right brain approach pointing out that they only have 5 fingers but have 7 notes to play, so they can finger the scales 1-2-1-2 etc, 1-2-3-1-2-3 or 1-2-1-2-3-4-5 or if they want, 1-2-3-1-2-3-4. Which of these would probably be easiest in the long run, as well as fastest. Almost always, they conclude the last. I tell them congratulations, they are super smart as they just figured out what it took piano players 200 years to learn!

Bev, your student would make a great case study for a grad course in pedagogy! I hope these few ideas are some help.

John
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1251886 - 08/19/09 11:22 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
This student is 11 years old and going into 6th grade (1st year of middle school).

I felt Hanon was too advanced for her, as well, rhough she can play it. I can't imagine how she was taught it, though.

I did speak with her Mom... she felt that her daughter was overwhelmed, because my approach was so different than what she's used to. The daughter says, "I'm so confused". I can certainly understand that. She said that she and her husband have both given her the opportunity to stop piano if she chooses. Mom says that her daughter hems and haws about it, which she assumes is neither a yes nor a no. So, she continues.

John, you gave me a good laugh when you said she'd make a great case study... OMG! Thanks for your input.

Hopefully, the two of us will find a "groove", so to speak, and begin to make progress. Time will tell.

BevP

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#1251890 - 08/19/09 11:30 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Bev, sometimes it's all in the presentation. Go to your music dealer and take a look at Melody Bober's Piano Library, "Grand Solos for Piano" series. She might be in level 2, but you could use level 1 for review, explaining that you think this will take about 8 - 10 weeks to go through, mostly review, just to cement concepts. She might enjoy the different music.

You could do 1 & 2 together, 1 for review, 2 for study. (Or 2 & 3, I'm just being hypothetical here.)

A lot of girls discover boys about this age. It's bad news for parents and teachers.

John
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#1251941 - 08/19/09 01:01 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3158
But its good news for boys! smile
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#1251954 - 08/19/09 01:13 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: rocket88]
Ebony and Ivory Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/14/05
Posts: 1179
Loc: Minnesota
Originally Posted By: rocket88
But its good news for boys! smile


LOL smile
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#1252022 - 08/19/09 03:26 PM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Ebony and Ivory]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
Oh, tell me about it, with the boy thing. I have one student (also a neighbor), who is totally boy crazy! Shall I tell her that in the olden days, young ladies were given piano lessons in order to attract suitors? wink


Seriously, though, from this particular student, I don't get the vibe that she's boy crazy.
BevP

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#1252298 - 08/20/09 12:18 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
Piano Again Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/12/04
Posts: 1162
Loc: Washington metro
Not that I know a darn thing, but do you have other students who get together to play for each other (studio recital/master class kind of thing)? Maybe seeing and hearing other kids playing might pique her interest. What she's been doing sounds dry and detached from real music.
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#1253076 - 08/21/09 12:21 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Piano Again]
BSP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 209
Loc: Hudson Valley, NY
I do have studio recitals, but just once a year, in the spring. I'd love to do something for Christmas time, though. If I'm going to do it this year, I'd better get in gear...

BevP

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#1253232 - 08/21/09 09:03 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
Ebony and Ivory Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/14/05
Posts: 1179
Loc: Minnesota
Originally Posted By: BSP
I'd love to do something for Christmas time, though. If I'm going to do it this year, I'd better get in gear...BevP


It's about the only time you can get away with 6 versions of the same piece lol smile
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#1253251 - 08/21/09 09:51 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: Ebony and Ivory]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11422
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I usually do a Christmas recital at a nursing home and then a recital at the end of the school year, but I've found that it is such a busy time at both times that the kids have too much music to learn and other things going on. Plus it seemed especially this past Spring that the effort I put into the recital was too much for me to handle as well.

Since they are preparing for Solo/Ensemble and WMTA auditions in late Feb/early March, I decided that we would have one recital at a nursing home on Nov. 14th before the holidays, where they would play one or two of the pieces they've been working on. Then we would have their next recital on Feb. 13th a couple of weeks before the contests begin. They will perform the remainder of their pieces here. That way they are not working on other music that might detract from their contest pieces, and also gives them lots of performance opportunities with them.

We'll see how it goes, and I'm sure there will be some parents who will comment on how much they enjoyed the previous recital (where I did duets and used lots of different instruments), but it really was so stressful to organize rehearsals and it felt like I was pulling teeth. So, a little simplification was in order wink.
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#1253306 - 08/21/09 11:10 AM Re: I had an odd studio interview today.. [Re: BSP]
Piano Again Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/12/04
Posts: 1162
Loc: Washington metro
Originally Posted By: BSP
I do have studio recitals, but just once a year, in the spring. I'd love to do something for Christmas time, though. If I'm going to do it this year, I'd better get in gear...

BevP


Well, could you have her observe another kid's lesson (someone at approximately the same age and level, whatever that is)? With the other student's permission, of course.

It just sounds like she is not thinking/feeling musically at all -- piano is just an unenjoyable mechanical exercise to her. If she could see and hear one of her peers approaching it differently, maybe it would make an impression.

Did you ask her what kind of music she likes?
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