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#1303188 - 11/11/09 11:10 AM Accelerated program for an eager student
Morodiene Online   content
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Registered: 04/06/07
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Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I currently have a boy who is around 10 years old in Hal Leonard method Book 2, he is currently in the middle. So he has not yet officially gotten to flats (just did sharps) and has not done 8th notes (which are in Book 3). However, we have been working on scales and so he does know what flats are already, and he has played some pieces in supplemental materials with 8th notes.

He seems to be doing well, but I suspect this is too easy for him. Not that easy is a bad thing, but I do wonder how he'd do with more of a challenge, something that progresses a bit faster. He is not really prepared for the Celebration Series, even their introductory level, but I would like to get him in there eventually.

Any suggestions on what I could switch to that would help? I know I could simply skip ahead on books and assign him pieces, but I'd hate to skip over something important.
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#1303200 - 11/11/09 11:25 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
Gyro Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/24/05
Posts: 4533
I shudder when I hear
words like: accelerated, fast
sections, gifted programs,
advanced placement, college
prep, prodigy, genius, etc.
There is no better way to burn
a student out than to put him
into an accelerated section, or
gifted program, etc.
The ordinary sections are
difficult enough without
putting the label of gifted
on a child and then forcing
him into a program where he's
expected to constantly shine.

This student needs to stay
right where he is at now.

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#1303208 - 11/11/09 11:37 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Gyro]
jotur Online   blank
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Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 5659
Loc: Santa Fe, NM
Gyro - frown For some students you may be right. But some of us, just sayin', needed a challenge in order to not be bored, to be motivated, and to be delighted with and rewarded by our results.

And Morodiene didn't use any of the adjectives you used. She said "eager" - an attribute that seems positively positive to me smile

I do agree that "stage parents" can pressure a child unduly. I just don't think it's universal, nor do I think that's what's being implied here.

Cathy

EDIT: Oh, I see. It was the word "accelerated" in the title that triggered you. frown But I stand by everything I said any way smile

Cathy


Edited by jotur (11/11/09 11:47 AM)
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#1303222 - 11/11/09 12:07 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: jotur]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17815
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
What's more, the literature on educating the gifted child shows that gifted kids actually *perform worse* if forced to advance more slowly than they're ready for. The usual argument school districts use for justifying their failure to fund gifted/talented programs is that it won't hurt the bright students to learn the material at a slower pace. The reality is that, yes, it hurts them significantly, and not just in terms of attitude--they'll actually start getting lower test scores etc. than if they were allowed to progress at the pace that's right for them.
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#1303233 - 11/11/09 12:27 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Monica K.]
Gyro Offline
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Registered: 04/24/05
Posts: 4533
In my view, all gifted programs
and prep schools should
be shuttered and everyone put
into the regular track in the
public school system, with
no groupings in the various classes,
that is, everyone sits in a
classroom where the students
are put at random. The teachers
in public schools are highly
educated and meticulously
trained professionals, and if
that's no good enough for anyone,
then nothing else will be.

These gifted programs and prep
schools often produce a bunch
of bums who have been coddled
all their lives in the academic
system and then can't function
in the real world. They need
a dose of reality that a
public school will give.

You often hear that so-called
gifted students are bored in
non-gifted classes, but isn't
this "boredom" simply a lack
of discipline? A sharp student
should be able to get along in
any kind of environment if he's
so smart. If he can't, that indicates
to me that he's pretty un-smart,
not smart.



Edited by Gyro (11/11/09 12:52 PM)

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#1303249 - 11/11/09 12:44 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Gyro]
Piano*Dad Offline
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Registered: 04/12/05
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codswallop.
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#1303268 - 11/11/09 01:09 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Piano*Dad]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17815
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
You are certainly entitled to your opinion, Gyro, but it is not one supported by the educational and psychological literature. The report "A nation deceived: How schools hold back America's brightest students" summarizes the scholarly data that refute just about everything you said in your reply.


Which, I guess, is an ever-more-polite way of saying "codswallop." wink
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#1303285 - 11/11/09 01:23 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Monica K.]
Piano*Dad Offline
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Loc: Williamsburg, VA
Morodiene,

Use your judgment about what important stuff might be skipped if you leave method books behind. Then fill it in on your own.

All I know is that my own son left method books for real literature very quickly (at the end of his first year) and it doesn't seem to have cost him anything in missed topics of importance.
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#1303295 - 11/11/09 01:30 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Piano*Dad]
Minniemay Offline
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Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
I wouldn't skip anything. I would choose what stuff to do in the lesson (but not assign) and then assign just enough material to determine the concept is understood and applied. You can also choose appropriately challenging supplementary material that uses those concepts.

You can always find ways to challenge within the materials you have chosen. Otherwise, you do take the cahnce of missing important material. I have a transfer student like that now. Don't do it! You will end up backtracking anyway.
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#1303308 - 11/11/09 01:47 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Monica K.]
landorrano Offline
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Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2472
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: Monica K.


"A nation deceived: How schools hold back America's brightest students"




Scholarly data is often a lot of codswallop too.

And what about the others, those that are not judged the brightest, what's holding them back?

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#1303310 - 11/11/09 01:49 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Gyro]
landorrano Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2472
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: Gyro
The teachers
in public schools are highly
educated and meticulously
trained professionals


Originally Posted By: Gyro
The teachers
in public schools are highly
educated and meticulously
trained professionals


Originally Posted By: Gyro
The teachers
in public schools are highly
educated and meticulously
trained professionals


Originally Posted By: Gyro
The teachers
in public schools are highly
educated and meticulously
trained professionals

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#1303323 - 11/11/09 02:09 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
Sparkler Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/09
Posts: 177
I have a couple of kids like that and I can sense that they're getting bored with the repetitiveness and the slowness in some of the method books.

With those kids, I tend to sit down with them, and in a couple of lessons, give them a fun little course in the very basics of full staff reading - grand staff, clefs, rhythms, what sharps or flats are, and how to read the notes (with the abbreviations.)

Then after a couple of weeks I transition them quickly to the Keith Snell repertoire series, primer level. The couple I have done that with, are as pleased as pie with themselves and are really loving the "real" music, and they have just taken off from there.

Sometimes I think many kids (not all) can handle a lot more than we give them credit for...

The kids I'm speaking of, are between age 8 and 11.

*Edited to add - I have 2 sons, with whom I skipped the method books entirely when they were 8. They were playing "real" music out of these repertoire books in a few days after learning how to read notes. From there I've just taught them theory and technique as we go along and they caught on super quickly.

A few weeks after they learned to read notes, I started them on 1 octave scales. And they're not musical geniuses by any stretch, just bright and eager to learn. I think for some kids, sticking them with a method book for 2-3 years is a great disservice.

Keep in mind, the repertoire of which I'm speaking of is very simple stuff, just like in some of the method books. However, it is written by "real" composers and are not all in the C position even right at the beginning. Most of the pieces are in C or G, some are in F. All are delightful, and now my kids fight me for practice time.


Edited by Sparkler (11/11/09 02:21 PM)
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#1303332 - 11/11/09 02:23 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Sparkler]
Morodiene Online   content
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Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 12236
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Can we please stick to the subject?

I never said he was "gifted" and the adjective "accelerated" was to be applied to the books, and not to the student. Why are you talking about prep schools and public schools in this thread?

I sensed that this boy is a bit bored with what this method book is providing, and I see that he needs to move ahead at a faster rate, thus the "accelerated". It is in response to his progress, and not me imposing it upon him. His parents aren't pushing him or anything, so stop making assumptions and hijacking threads to get on your own soap box, Gyro. If you want to talk about public vs. private schools, then make you own thread (when was the last time you did that, anyways?)

Sparkler, I think I may look into the Keith Snell series. I agree that getting him to play "real" pieces early on will keep him enthusiastic about piano. Thanks!
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#1303616 - 11/11/09 08:14 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17815
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
Can we please stick to the subject?



Er, sorry, Morodiene. That's what I get for engaging Gyro in debate. whome

To go back on track, why not ask your student if there are any pieces or songs he's dying to play? If he's getting through the method series so handily, being able to work on his favorite rock song, say, could be a motivating reward but not have the downside of him missing out on anything in the method series.
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#1303682 - 11/11/09 10:28 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Monica K.]
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
Morodiene,

Using supplement teaching books by music education composers is really a joy - you can find them at any level including primer. I, myself, don't use a published method but have 10 lessons of keyboard orientation using precharts and simple 5 finger positions with a range of about 9 melody notes (Middle C thumbs/Middle D thumbs/and various graphics that show the position; We concentrate on counting well, fingering well, phrasing and producing good sound for those 10 weeks. The music has been children's songs, folk tunes, and Christmas when appropriate.)

This is all the preparation I do before using the grand staff, but kids play fluently at this point and the transition to grand staff is not too difficult as graphics are still sometimes used, and I do teach music by positions (all 12 of the 5 fingered ones are learned). This makes the reading of music with accuracy quite a strong possibility. So I have confidence that good musicianship can be instilled timely and quickly without going into the methods.

When finished with this "orientation" it doesn't take very long, I go directly to supplements and next start early classics written by teaching composers during the evolution of the piano.

There's parts I've left off here but basically I think it's that easy - without thinking "accelerated" piano books.

A child is not really accelerating if the pace of his learning is being met. He is learning at or near his capacity.

I hope this posting helps without seeming like a commercial or arrogant. I would love an opportunity to teach and demonstrate to other teachers how this works - maybe as a summer program.

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#1303759 - 11/12/09 01:07 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Monica K.]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5598
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Monica K.
What's more, the literature on educating the gifted child shows that gifted kids actually *perform worse* if forced to advance more slowly than they're ready for. The usual argument school districts use for justifying their failure to fund gifted/talented programs is that it won't hurt the bright students to learn the material at a slower pace. The reality is that, yes, it hurts them significantly, and not just in terms of attitude--they'll actually start getting lower test scores etc. than if they were allowed to progress at the pace that's right for them.


Please share that info with Teachers' Unions. Please.

One of our esteemed union reps told me the best classrooms are ones that draw on diverse experiences, from remedial to advanced. Yeah, try telling that to our math department!
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#1303761 - 11/12/09 01:09 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: AZNpiano]
AZNpiano Offline
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Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5598
Loc: Orange County, CA
Morodiene:

You can just assign a bunch of pieces at once. That's what I did when I was teaching out of Schaum and Thompson. I also had supplemental repertoire books at the prep level.

Or switch your student to Thompson. That's one accelerated program.
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#1303784 - 11/12/09 02:03 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: AZNpiano]
Pete the bean Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/06/04
Posts: 468
Loc: Canada
Some supplementary material I have found to be excellent is Carl Strommen And All That Jazz vol 1-3. Vol 1 may be a bit of a challenge for a student at level 2 HAl Leonard but I think it is doable and it is so fun to play along with the CD. A great way to build a sense of time and swing the eighths.
Hal Leonard does not advance as quickly as other methods so maybe assign more songs each week to get through the books quicker. It will really help the reading ability to have more songs to play.
It is a bit of a tough balance to move on to more challenging material too fast. I find that working on one supplemtary piece that is a bit of a challenge can mess with reading skills if the student does not increase their practice time with the increase in difficulty. Watch their eyes. If they start watching the hands a lot instead of the music, it's time to go back to some more simple pieces.


Edited by Pete the bean (11/12/09 02:18 AM)
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#1303857 - 11/12/09 08:13 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Pete the bean]
Gyro Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/24/05
Posts: 4533
I believe that this is applicable
to the topic, since you say the
student is "bored." This is
the key word, in my view. You hear this
word used all the time in the context of
gifted students, accelerated
programs, advanced placement, and
the like. The students are
"bored" with material that is "too
easy" for them. When I hear this,
it make me want to puke, and I can't
see why it doesn't do the same
for the rest of you.

What is "boredom," but a lack of
discipline and initiative? If
a sharp student is "bored" with
material that is "unchallenging,"
then what is to keep him from
taking on more challenging material,
on his own? If he can't do that,
then that shows lack of initiative,
not smartness, in my view. And
in the real world boredom is
a fact of life. There are going
to be many periods in a person's
life where he may have to just
do busy work and be content
with twiddling his thumbs,
so to speak, since he
can't be breaking new barriers
constantly--that's just not
possible in the real world. This
practice in "boredom" is actually
good training for life; it teaches
discipline for the real world.
Students who cannot deal with
boredom have a serious problem,
in my view. They are avoiding
having to develop discipline
and initiative, things that are
essential of life in the real
world.

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#1303873 - 11/12/09 09:02 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Gyro]
Morodiene Online   content
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Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Gyro, how do you know he hasn't taken on songs on his own? Do you know this kid? In fact, he has taken on songs on his own, which is one of the signs to me that he's "bored." And someone being bored has nothing to do with private and public schools, which is what your previous post was ranting about. But I appreciate the backpedaling.

To everyone else, thanks for the pointers. It sounds like the best thing to do is assign some fun but challenging (not too challenging though) supplementary pieces for him to work on while giving him as much in the method as he can manage to get through it. We originally had a goal for this year of getting through Book 2 by Thanksgiving. He got off to a rough start this year because he decided to be in football, but we should still be able to finish at the very least before Christmas. Maybe I'll see if he has any interest in jazz, too.
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#1303874 - 11/12/09 09:03 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Monica K.]
Morodiene Online   content
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Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 12236
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: Monica K.
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
Can we please stick to the subject?



Er, sorry, Morodiene. That's what I get for engaging Gyro in debate. whome

To go back on track, why not ask your student if there are any pieces or songs he's dying to play? If he's getting through the method series so handily, being able to work on his favorite rock song, say, could be a motivating reward but not have the downside of him missing out on anything in the method series.


No problem, Monica. It wasn't really directed at you. I do love the factoids you bring to this forum, even if a bit OT. laugh
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#1305035 - 11/13/09 06:37 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
Daniel M Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/09/09
Posts: 43
Loc: Fife, WA
I didn't get far into this topic, but I had to stop at this:

"The teachers
in public schools are highly
educated and meticulously
trained professionals, and if
that's no good enough for anyone,
then nothing else will be."

Um, how long has it been since you were in the public school system? I'm 21, in my third year of college, so I am a recent product of the public school system.

There may be some schools out there that are just fine, but I am willing to bet that most are sub-par. Over the recent years I have heard many people state that companies are complaining about the horrible lack of education students have when they apply.

Public school teachers have to last, oh what is it...4 years, before they get tenure? And then it is virtually impossible to fire them. So where is there incentive to be decent teachers? The kindness of their hearts? Well yea, for some I'm sure, but dealing with high school brats all day everyday is going to sap the patience of anyone without the makings of a saint.

Just to give you an idea:

In junior high and early high school I was still coloring in my English/social studies courses. This includes coloring in maps. Awesome.

In these same English classes, no grammar was taught. No teaching on how to write whatsoever. It was basically get together and do a class reading session. Either the entire class took parts in reading a long book (for example, reading Romeo and Juliet) or we split up into smaller groups and had to listen to each other read.

Precalculus, senior year, I spent more time playing cards than I did on math because we blew through our assignments (that the teacher never checked to make sure we did).

Public schooling ain't that great.


Edited by Daniel M (11/13/09 06:39 PM)
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#1305310 - 11/14/09 08:20 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Daniel M]
Morodiene Online   content
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Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
That surprises me, Daniel, but I guess it does depend on the city you're in. The town I grew up in was more affluent and so the public schools brought in a lot of excellent teachers and could pay them well. The town I live in now is not as affluent but the public schools are again, excellent, and the teachers get paid quite well. Being a school teacher is not an easy thing. It demands so much of your own unpaid time for preparation (usually they don't pay you for enough prep time), many supplies are bought by the teacher out of their own pockets, especially for students who can't afford things they need. Even getting the degrees required to teach are time-consuming: not only is the basic education degree about a 5-year program in most universities, there's also certification which you have to maintain.

So I have a lot of respect for public school teachers, but not for ones who teach to the lowest common denominator. I think English grammar is taught much earlier than high school, and so the assumption is that you've gone through that already. I see nothing wrong with reading Romeo and Juliet aloud as it is a play and meant to be heard (not read silently). I'm sorry that your education was so lacking. This is probably what Monica meant by the report she mentioned that the "no child left behind" really means that those who are more intelligent get bored and thus don't do as well.

I also don't think if I ever had a child that I would have them in a public school - home schooling is best because then you get to spend all that one-on-one time with your child, and the programs are so good now with lots of support for the parent who may not be strong in a particular subject themselves.

Anyways, that was totally OT on my own subject, but I wanted to address with Daniel wrote.
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#1305511 - 11/14/09 05:43 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
SueKZ Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/17/09
Posts: 97
Loc: Colorado
Gyro, I can only assume you are a licensed teacher since you are an expert on education of the gifted. Oy vey give me a break. If you don't individualize for every student you are a bad teacher period. And no one method works for every child, either. I am a licensed elem. teacher and trust me you have no clue what you are talking about. Both of my kids were in self contained gifted classrooms all thru elem school and I still thank God they were able to be as challenged as they were. They are both successful adults with great jobs. They are still thankful they were in that program. Its a BAD thing to hold kids back academically if they are ready for the material. They tend to act out of boredom and desperation.


Edited by SueKZ (11/14/09 05:45 PM)
Edit Reason: typo
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#1305789 - 11/15/09 01:23 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: SueKZ]
Minniemay Offline
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Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
Amen. That has been our experience with our children as well.
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#1306219 - 11/15/09 06:18 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
Daniel M Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/09/09
Posts: 43
Loc: Fife, WA
I am so hijacking this thread. You are right Morodiene, I am not saying that all public schools are bad. A friend I had spoke very well of hers.

A book I am reading right now says that the Bureau of Labor Statistics puts the average middle-school teacher's annual salary at $52k. I am going for an accounting degree, which takes about that long (or longer) and that's about how much I can hope to make. Also, teachers have a smaller workdays(preparation time excluded), longer vacations, and public-sector health and retirement benefits. Okay, I practically plagiarized the last part out of my book =P. And then they are not really accountable for their performance.

I haven't heard of teachers buying things for their students. I won't contest the point, but I wonder how widespread this is. I know the government helps out a lot with underprivileged children.

"I think English grammar is taught much earlier than high school, and so the assumption is that you've gone through that already."

You are so right. Homeschooling is the way to go.

Gah! There it is! That blasted assumption. I've heard that from several English teachers throughout the years. All it takes is one 8th grade teacher to not teach how to write, and then the student will never learn, based on that one assumption.

And I suppose I could consider reading Romeo and Juliet aloud if it was some sort of Shakespeare analysis class. However, sitting in a classroom for an hour and half listening to peers read lines...where is the benefit? You listening to others read, so you are not reading. And at the end, how has it helped you? Well, you'll be able to take a test on the contents of the play, but how is that going to help you? It doesn't challenge you to think. It is rote memorization and recall, which really isn't going to benefit you beyond your test score.

And I don't think teachers are entirely to blame. I would blame school curriculum far more than blaming teachers.
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#1306501 - 11/16/09 09:59 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Daniel M]
Morodiene Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 12236
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I'm not saying that public school is the way to go...I truly believe in home schooling. However, I had a wonderful experience in public schools once I figured out how to learn from teachers and trust them after being emotionally abused in a catholic elementary school (it was a maturing process for me). Unless you have walked a mile in someone's shoes, however, you really cannot judge what it's like.

I have taught K-5 music part-time, and that drained so much energy from me. Working part-time there was like working a full time job anywhere else. I was paid a paltry sum for my credentials and while I loved the kids, it was almost impossible to really teach them much in the 2 days a week that I saw them (a half day was spent in preparing the children to sing at Mass on Wednesdays - this was a private catholic school). I was given an hour prep for each day, which was not nearly enough to cover the 6 different curricula each class was to get. Most of the prep was done at home on my own time. While most of the materials I needed for the children were provided, I did purchase many things on my own for them. I know for a fact that the other teachers woudl often buy supplies for many of the kids. Just because there are programs that pay for things doesn't mean the parents are too prideful or lazy to take advantage of them. It then falls on the teacher who doens't want to see that child suffer as a result.

And by the way, *my* assumption that someone woudl have been taught grammar far earlier than 8th grade is not necessarily the assumption of an English teacher. I'm not an English teacher so it is not my area of expertise. My comment was simply to say that why would anyone be taught something that they would have been taught several grades earlier? Obviously a good teacher would take note of a student who somehow slipped through to the following grade without actually learning what they needed and would take them under their wing - some more work outside of what they get paid for.
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#1306743 - 11/16/09 04:36 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Morodiene]
david_a Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 2913
Morodiene:

(back on topic)

There is nothing in that method book, except for the theory component, that your student would not get from simply playing any good music at all. So continuing with the method book is an option for you, but not the only one. As long as you can find a good way for him to learn the theory items he'd miss, he should be fine.

Eager students pick up stuff as they go along, from wherever they can get it. It's the students who are not so eager who really need to complete every page of a particular method book without missing things - not because they're dumb or something, simply because one can't count on them to go around searching for new things to learn.
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#1306752 - 11/16/09 04:54 PM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: Gyro]
ProdigalPianist Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/08/07
Posts: 1049
Loc: Phoenix Metro, AZ
Originally Posted By: Gyro


What is "boredom," but a lack of
discipline and initiative? If
a sharp student is "bored" with
material that is "unchallenging,"
then what is to keep him from
taking on more challenging material,
on his own?


Being "bored" is reading at a 12th grade level when you're in 4th grade...having read til the end of your reading and English books by the second month of the school year, and not being ALLOWED any other reading material during class. Being forced to listen to classmates reading aloud stumble through page 2 when you have already read to the end of the play.

If I had been ALLOWED to read other material, instead of hiding my library books behind my "literature" and "English" books that had been read for weeks or months, in fear of getting caught and punished for "not staying with the class"...then I wouldn't have been BORED.

Edited to add: Sorry Morodien blush

In addition to supplementary material, can you maybe have him "test out" of some topics? By which I mean, if, through giving him verbal quizzes he shows he really thoroughly understands...say...flats as you mention, then I wouldn't be too worried about spending a whole lot of time on pieces in his method book that teaches flats. In short, not a lot of mindless repetition of stuff he understands, but a sort of backup verification that he Does understand it...so you're not skipping anything essential?

I don't know if that makes sense.


Edited by ProdigalPianist (11/16/09 05:01 PM)
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#1307023 - 11/17/09 05:36 AM Re: Accelerated program for an eager student [Re: ProdigalPianist]
Wizard of Oz Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/12/09
Posts: 873
GRYO, just SHUT UP!!!! You are spouting utter nonsense again. I took about 1/2 my classes during high school in an "International Baccalaureate" or advanced program. The rest were regular.

If I didn't have the smarter kids to push me and challenge me, I would have slacked off. There was a huge difference between the two. When you are surrounded by an environment where learning and improving is encouraged, it makes you want to do better. When you are in a group who are lazy, goofing off, causing trouble, guess what, you tend to do the same.


**Morodiene, as for your student, why don't you try to teach them improvising. I don't know how much you know of the jazz idiom, but introduce new types of music. You can also do it with popular music.
I am teaching a student now who has a regular classical teacher, and I supplement it with jazz, pop, improv.

I show him jazz chords, major 7th, minor 7th, dom. Jazz or modern scales like the pentatonic or blues scale.
I teach him how to learn a new song by ear, listening, singing the melody, figuring out the key, theme, and putting chords to it.

We've played some movie and TV themes, and some simple jazz songs.

That might get the kid's interest up.

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