Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) End Stage Fright
End Stage Fright
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#936576 - 12/10/08 09:23 AM Teaching Bach Inventions
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 10742
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I have two boys that are ready to begin Bach Inventions. I know that I started out with No. 8 in F Major, and I think that may be a nice one to begin with. Does anyone else have suggestions as to which would be good to begin with, and why?
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
(ad) My Music Staff
Check out the new way to manage your music studio
#936577 - 12/10/08 10:31 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
theJourney Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/22/07
Posts: 3946
Loc: Banned

Top
#936578 - 12/10/08 10:39 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7200
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
TJ - interesting. I haven't been over on PS for a while. Guess I need to spend some time reading there.

Morodiene, #4 is the easiest by far, and that's not so easy, if done properly. I'm assuming they've done a handful of the AMB notebook dances and some easier preludes????

#4 is also a good starter because you can easily identify the subject throughout (including inversions) and teach your students to bring out the subject whereever it appears. I generally have them look through and visually identify the subject and with a pencil, mark it with a line or something similar.

#4 is also good for adding ornaments.

Many teachers then progress to #1 in C. I find playing in C major rather difficult, so usually put that one off until later.

Seems to me that Clavier had an extensive article a few years back, on the 15 inventions, breaking them down into their compositional structure and level of difficulty. You might want to check for that.

John
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

Top
#936579 - 12/10/08 10:43 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
Chris H. Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/05
Posts: 2837
Loc: UK.
Why not start with no.1?

I do love the F major though.
_________________________
Pianist and piano teacher.

Top
#936580 - 12/10/08 10:46 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
cruiser Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/19/07
Posts: 1171
Loc: Cornwall, England
 Quote:
Originally posted by theJourney:
I find this a useful resource:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,2714.0.html [/b]
excellent resource, theJourney... thanks very much! \:\)

Top
#936581 - 12/10/08 10:55 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 10742
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
TheJourney: I'll take some time and read through that thread, thanks!

John: Yes, they've both done several AMB pieces and some of the "little" preludes. One boy did only one of the little preludes and this was quite easy for him, so I think he's ready for the Inventions.

Interesting, since #4 was my second piece, and I found it to be a bit awkward in the hands. But because of the minor key I think that the one boy may enjoy it a lot musically.

I seem to recall that article in Clavier...I'll have to dig that up!
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
#936582 - 12/11/08 12:40 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5275
Loc: Orange County, CA
I start with No. 1. It's the easiest one, in my opinion. I've also started a few students with No. 14, but they have been playing the piano for over 7 years. I also have taught No. 2 and No. 8 to mid-intermediate students. No. 2 is cool because I take it extra slow, and there's just one tricky spot (where the hands overlap due to the fact the piano has just one "manual").

I don't think No. 4 is easy at all. It's very hard to play, extremely fast, especially the left hand long trill!! Every year at our Bach Festival some little kid tries to play No. 4 and almost always fails miserably. I've learned to steer clear of that one until later, but by then kids are ready to move on to French Suites or WTC.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

Top
#936583 - 12/11/08 09:07 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 10742
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
No. 14 is my favorite out of all of them, actually (the ones I know, I haven't learned them all). Both of these boys have been playing for 6-7 years, but they may freak from the 32nd notes. I don't think this would be great as a first, but definitely somewhere down the line. I also agree, AZN about the long trill in No. 4, it's hard to pull it off well.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
#936584 - 12/11/08 10:27 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7200
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
I play all 15 of them straight through, although Bach didn't conceive them this way nor compose them this way.

Many teachers, like AZN, consider #1 the easiest. Presumably, this is because it's in C major. C major is a difficult key for us to play in, because of the shape of our hands; it is, however, an easy key to read. We shouldn't confuse the two.

MM 11 - 14 are difficult to play well and it's obvious, this was written to be played on a two manual harpsichord.

Teaching the long trills in #4 is quite easy. Teach students to play 2 against one. The trills should end on at the end of beat 2 in measures 21 and 32. In the Baroque period, no one played a trill forever.

In general, I think we teachers tend to introduce the Inventions too early to students. For example, if a student can play Kulau Op 55, #3, then he or she is probably advanced enough for these.

For student musicians, being able to have complete independence of hands is critical to successfully playing the inventions. IMO. ;\)
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

Top
#1311305 - 11/24/09 12:07 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: theJourney]
Passion Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/13/09
Posts: 70
Originally Posted By: theJourney
I find this a useful resource:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,2714.0.html


This is an amazing read, thank you. I saved it to my hard drive just in case it slips into oblivion for some reason.

Top
#1311338 - 11/24/09 02:27 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: John v.d.Brook]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook

Many teachers, like AZN, consider #1 the easiest. Presumably, this is because it's in C major. C major is a difficult key for us to play in, because of the shape of our hands; it is, however, an easy key to read. We shouldn't confuse the two.

MM 11 - 14 are difficult to play well and it's obvious, this was written to be played on a two manual harpsichord.
Not obvious at all when you consider the difficulty his students would have had fitting a two manual harpsichord into their study carrels.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1311339 - 11/24/09 02:30 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: theJourney]
landorrano Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2443
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: theJourney
I find this a useful resource:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,2714.0.html


Excellent!

Top
#1311344 - 11/24/09 02:39 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
The link is well worth a read. For all his learning Bernard does miss out two essential points. a) the invention is the actual motif used not how it is used - Bach is illustrating the different types of tiny ideas (motifs) you can come up with and what is suitable treatment for each type. b) Bach does not mean legato (in fact he writes phrase marks when he wants it) that's not the aspect of 'singing' he is referring to.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1311347 - 11/24/09 02:43 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5275
Loc: Orange County, CA
Very timely revival of an old thread.

I'm teaching several students the Inventions right now for their upcoming tests. I cannot stress enough the importance of consistent fingering and practicing one hand at a time.

Don't trust the students to come up with their own fingerings at home. Question every fingering suggestion from the editor. I spend a fair amount of time discussing fingering choices with my students. There are usually several possible fingerings for each passage. Always take into account of the student's hand size, the strength of the 4th and 5th fingers, and "unusual" fingerings to solve particular legato problems.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

Top
#1311348 - 11/24/09 02:45 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: AZNpiano]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Good point ANZ - if they're about anything they're about fingering!
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1311365 - 11/24/09 05:38 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
landorrano Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2443
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: keyboardklutz
The link is well worth a read. For all his learning Bernard does miss out two essential points.


Luckily, Keyboardklutz is there to add the essential points.

Top
#1311379 - 11/24/09 07:18 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: landorrano]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Would you like some more points? Each one seems to be a different genre. I know no. 4 is a Giga II and no. 10 is a Correntes. Anybody know what the others are?

No. 14 always strikes me as an overture.
No. 8 reminds of the Brandenburg Concertos.


Edited by keyboardklutz (11/24/09 08:17 AM)
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1311447 - 11/24/09 10:17 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
Ann in Kentucky Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2643
Loc: Kentucky
I was surprised to see that Bernard teaches daily lessons for each child, not weekly. So it would cost parents 5 times as much (assuming a 5 day program)...I am just amazed that parents would commit to this.

Do any of you teach daily lessons for any child? Really wealthy parents, or very musically ambitious parents? How is it working for you?
_________________________
piano teacher

"She played upon her music box
a fancy air by chance,
And straightaway all her polka dots
began a lively dance."
-- Peter Newell

Top
#1311464 - 11/24/09 10:48 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: Ann in Kentucky]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3000
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Ann in Kentucky
I was surprised to see that Bernard teaches daily lessons for each child, not weekly.


As I recall, that changes as they advance, but he starts everybody that way. Then they reduce number of days over time.

They pay by the month, or maybe by the semester, so his rates may not be terribly different from yours. And I think the earlier lessons are shorter.

He also tries to do the practicing at the lesson so they do it correctly, I think that's one of the points of the daily lesson.
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
#1311478 - 11/24/09 11:35 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11166
Loc: Canada
Quote:
Bach is illustrating the different types of tiny ideas (motifs) you can come up with and what is suitable treatment for each type

I don't quite understand this sentence. When considering composition, what does "treatment" mean?

Top
#1311484 - 11/24/09 11:43 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keystring]
Ann in Kentucky Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2643
Loc: Kentucky
Thanks Tim. That makes sense...daily lessons in the beginning. It gives me the idea of perhaps offering summer intensive study for new beginners.
_________________________
piano teacher

"She played upon her music box
a fancy air by chance,
And straightaway all her polka dots
began a lively dance."
-- Peter Newell

Top
#1311490 - 11/24/09 11:48 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: TimR]
Andromaque Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/29/08
Posts: 3885
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: TimR
Originally Posted By: Ann in Kentucky
I was surprised to see that Bernard teaches daily lessons for each child, not weekly.


As I recall, that changes as they advance, but he starts everybody that way. Then they reduce number of days over time.

They pay by the month, or maybe by the semester, so his rates may not be terribly different from yours. And I think the earlier lessons are shorter.

He also tries to do the practicing at the lesson so they do it correctly, I think that's one of the points of the daily lesson.


Is the guy for real?? I mean could he not be fantasizing? He does have a knowledge base but .. I will admit that I haev not read everything over there but I have read through this thread as it is often referenced here. I also read about his pedagogigal approach. But some of it just seems unrealistic.

Top
#1311519 - 11/24/09 12:43 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keystring]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: keystring
Quote:
Bach is illustrating the different types of tiny ideas (motifs) you can come up with and what is suitable treatment for each type

I don't quite understand this sentence. When considering composition, what does "treatment" mean?
You craft your motif to suit the vehicle (genre). Your treatment of that motif is how the 'vehicle' comes about. Bach could predict how another's composition was going to pan out as soon as he heard the opening few bars - he immediately knew the potential of the initial idea.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1311524 - 11/24/09 12:58 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 10742
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I can see the value of daily lessons for the beginner. I think it is very hard to send them on their way and hope that they know what to do every day. You can give them information overload trying to give them good instructions for the week! So then you compromise and let them figure out some things on their own and gradually give them more instruction on practice in consecutive lessons. Certainly not the ideal.

For my voice students, I recently instituted a policy where they come 3 times a week for the first 8 lessons (I know, it doesn't really add up nicely, but that's residual from my regular 8-lesson trial period of once a week, I'll change it eventually :)). They are told not to practice at all in between lessons. This is for tow reasons: 1) We are building up strength in the breathing muscles and in the laryngeal muscles, so they need the time off in between for rest and 2) So that they do not practice wrong, counteracting the work we do in lessons by going back to their old way of singing. So far, students have found a way to do this, and it really have been a benefit. I think then next time I'm ready to start a beginner piano student, I'll institute something similar, but perhaps twice a week for a month or something.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
#1311529 - 11/24/09 01:19 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11166
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: keyboardklutz
Originally Posted By: keystring
Quote:
Bach is illustrating the different types of tiny ideas (motifs) you can come up with and what is suitable treatment for each type

I don't quite understand this sentence. When considering composition, what does "treatment" mean?
You craft your motif to suit the vehicle (genre). Your treatment of that motif is how the 'vehicle' comes about. Bach could predict how another's composition was going to pan out as soon as he heard the opening few bars - he immediately knew the potential of the initial idea.

Thank you, I think I understand.

Top
#1311568 - 11/24/09 02:25 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: keyboardklutz]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5275
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: keyboardklutz
Would you like some more points? Each one seems to be a different genre. I know no. 4 is a Giga II and no. 10 is a Correntes. Anybody know what the others are?

No. 14 always strikes me as an overture.
No. 8 reminds of the Brandenburg Concertos.


No. 2 and No. 7 feel like duets (vocal) to me. I'd play these really really slow and enjoy the inflections of every phrase.

No. 3 sounds like a short prelude.

How is No. 4 a gigue?

No. 6 is unique because of the rounded binary form with repeats. Probably a corrente or passipied.

No. 10 feels like a gigue.

No. 12, probably the most virtuoso of the set, sounds like a prelude from the WTC in terms of difficulty and brilliance.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

Top
#1311573 - 11/24/09 02:35 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: theJourney]
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
Originally Posted By: theJourney
I find this a useful resource:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,2714.0.html


Thank you, theJourney, for this unique link to Piano Street and the discussion of Bach: 2 and 3 Part Inventions.

I would recommend anyone having questions about Bach Inventions and how to teach them read through and keep this as a resource to come back to.

I found the idea that Bernard (the chief poster) in this topic, 1) teaches 5 year olds daily and then reduces the number of lessons accordingly, and 2) teaches Bach Inventions to beginners after they have learned to read from notation, but not necessarily to play skillfully yet, to be incredible concepts.

I have read only half of the first page and will eagerly read more to see what can add to my knowledge of teaching Bach. It's a good workout of the mind for growth and development as a musician and a teacher.

I'm taking John v.d.Brook's comment that he plays all back to back to be a challenge I would like to take on as a project since I've had favorites to play and teach but never attempted the entire work as a unit. It's not too late!

Betty Patnude

Top
#1311583 - 11/24/09 02:57 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: Betty Patnude]
david_a Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 2913
I doubt whether Bach viewed them as a unit to be performed all at once - but that doesn't mean we can't play them that way!

It's humbling to me to see how clumsily I play some of these today.
_________________________
(I'm a piano teacher.)

Top
#1311606 - 11/24/09 03:38 PM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: AZNpiano]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano

How is No. 4 a gigue?
That's from Little and Jenne Dance and the Music of Bach. They say no. 4 is Giga II like. No. 10 they designate Giga I (the difference between I and II is one of complexity) (I don't know where I got Corrente from). Also they designate no. 12 as Giga II.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1313711 - 11/28/09 04:15 AM Re: Teaching Bach Inventions [Re: John v.d.Brook]
kennywood Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/14/09
Posts: 43
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
I play all 15 of them straight through, although Bach didn't conceive them this way nor compose them this way.

Many teachers, like AZN, consider #1 the easiest. Presumably, this is because it's in C major. C major is a difficult key for us to play in, because of the shape of our hands; it is, however, an easy key to read. We shouldn't confuse the two.

MM 11 - 14 are difficult to play well and it's obvious, this was written to be played on a two manual harpsichord.

Teaching the long trills in #4 is quite easy. Teach students to play 2 against one. The trills should end on at the end of beat 2 in measures 21 and 32. In the Baroque period, no one played a trill forever.

In general, I think we teachers tend to introduce the Inventions too early to students. For example, if a student can play Kulau Op 55, #3, then he or she is probably advanced enough for these.

For student musicians, being able to have complete independence of hands is critical to successfully playing the inventions. IMO. wink


The C major invention was NOT intended for a two manual harpsichord. Of course it CAN be played on that instrument, but, it is just as accessible on the clavichord as on the harpsichord (and in our case the piano). Bach, on his title page for the inventions and sinfonias, states, "Honest method, by which the amateurs of the keyboard"...etc. Firstly, the term, "keyboard, in Bach's time meant any of several keyboard instruments, so none of the inventions or sinfonias would have been intended for one specific instrument. Secondly, the clavichord (not the harpsichord) was the most popular keyboard instrument of Bach's time for financial reasons as well as the fact that the clavichord takes up far less room than does a harpsichord (especially a two manual instrument). The term "amateur", in his introduction, then supports, even further, the fact that none of the inventions or sinfonias were intended for a two manual keyboard, since most amateurs/students, could not afford a two manual instrument nor would they more than likely have had access to one.
As to the trills in the 4th invention...there is no specific beat or fraction of a beat the trill needs to end on. The trill must include a minimum number of four notes, but may be freely interpreted afterward by the performer. Longer trills, such as those found in this invention may, indeed, consume the entire value of the note and that is the case here as evidenced by Bach's ties, which are found throughout his compositions when he asks for a trill to last the duration of succeeding note values. Baroque performers absolutely would have played lengthy trills. There are tons of examples to be found throughout the baroque literature and C.P.E. Bach talks about the long trill in his, "True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments".

Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >

Moderator:  Ken Knapp 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
75 registered (Akshay, Asmodeus, adanepst, ando, angelsong, 23 invisible), 1214 Guests and 42 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74206 Members
42 Forums
153516 Topics
2249686 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Re-stringing an 84yr old Grand.....?
by Grandpianoman
Today at 01:56 AM
Theme identification
by Polyphonist
Today at 01:26 AM
Morning Mist: a ballade for piano
by JoelW
Today at 12:27 AM
Insanity
by Polyphonist
Yesterday at 11:55 PM
Yamaha P140 sluggish keys : how to fix?
by Bambell
Yesterday at 11:52 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission