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#2130255 - 08/09/13 08:46 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: The Wind]
beeboss Offline
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Registered: 07/18/09
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Loc: uk south
Originally Posted By: The Wind
I just heard the original with John Coltrane. Sounds quite different. Glasper's is 4/4? The original is some unusual time meter.


original is by Mongo Santamaria, you could call the rhythm afrocuban 6/8 maybe.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbE7jf_Hp5w


Edited by beeboss (08/09/13 08:49 AM)
Edit Reason: added link
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#2130256 - 08/09/13 08:48 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: The Wind]
beeboss Offline
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Originally Posted By: The Wind

Dominant chords have more variety because of the ALT notes you can throw in. A b2 #5 on a C major 7 chord ain't gonna sound too nice.



I like the maj7#5 sound, Jarrett uses that a lot. b2 (b9) can also be nice. it all depends on context. if you hear it then play it.
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#2130260 - 08/09/13 08:53 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jjo Online   content
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The Wind: The original Afro Blue is Mongo Santamaria, although Coltrane's version is quite famous. The original is in 3/4, and I think you're right that Glasper changed it to 4.

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#2130294 - 08/09/13 10:08 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
The Wind Offline
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Registered: 05/28/13
Posts: 468
Thanks for the clarification, seems like there's many versions on youtube. I just heard Diane Reeves.

that's the spirit of jazz, put your own interpretation on it, I do like Glaspers', he mixes hip hop elements into alot of his playing.

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#2130300 - 08/09/13 10:12 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: beeboss]
The Wind Offline
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Registered: 05/28/13
Posts: 468
Originally Posted By: beeboss


I like the maj7#5 sound, Jarrett uses that a lot. b2 (b9) can also be nice. it all depends on context. if you hear it then play it.


Yeah I like that sound too...or the minor/maj chord with the #7, they are basically the same chord as extensions.

Jarrett uses the major7#4 chord as a dominant chord. Like A7, he'll play G maj7#4, so the tritone is there.

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#2130313 - 08/09/13 10:35 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
knotty Offline
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Registered: 03/01/07
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Wind,
I agree with you. Add rhythm to the equation also. Imho, much more important than cool sound voicings is varied rhythms, always in the pocket.

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#2130373 - 08/09/13 12:31 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: The Wind]
jazzwee Offline
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Registered: 04/25/07
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Originally Posted By: The Wind
Afro Blues, nice tune. Surprised you guys play it. First time I heard it was this version with Robert Glasper and Esperanza Spalding. very catchy.



This has almost no bearing on the original. Aside from being an R&B version, the whole character of the Afro Blue is the single chord vamp. And of course the Coltrane version is particularly special to us Jazz pianists because of McCoy Tyner playing his usual quartal harmony on here.

Anyway, for us, the head didn't necessarily have to be Afro Blue since it's just a dorian Vamp like So What. I suppose we could have made up something on the spot as well.
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#2130375 - 08/09/13 12:41 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: The Wind]
jazzwee Offline
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Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7096
Loc: So. California
Originally Posted By: The Wind
Left hand comping chords:

Changing topics for a second, for comping how many different ways do you play a chord in normal or gig situations?

I find my hand remembers shapes that I like and usually play around 4-5. But if I consciously try to work in a new chord while playing it doesn't happen much. I have to sit down and figure out what I want to play.

Like say a 2-5-1 in C, I have my usual chords that my left hand gravitates to. It's almost by habit. But like everyone I can get bored of those sounds.

Dominant chords have more variety because of the ALT notes you can throw in. A b2 #5 on a C major 7 chord ain't gonna sound too nice.


I've been looking at some Keith Jarrett transcriptions and trying out his inner harmony moving notes. It actually takes the fingers a while to get used to it. The hardest part is he uses both left and right hands, while playing the melody note on top. Very tricky.


This is something I didn't really get till later. In a band setting, particularly with a quintet or with vocals, the pianist spends so much time comping. 3/4 of the time typically for me unless I'm playing in a trio.

At that point you realize that plonking rootless voicings with your LH all night isn't going to cut it.

Now fortunately, I was taught this. You have to think of comping as the same as improvising. Two hands. All registers. Varying the rhythm and register. This means being able to just play any voicing and making it up.

Pianist Bill Cunliffe taught me too that unless you use two hands, you really can't be heard on Piano particularly with other instruments around.

Playing in a combo just changes the thought process compared to solo piano. It's another one of these work-in-progress items for me. Comping with variety and chops (particularly rhythmically) is challenging.
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#2130384 - 08/09/13 12:56 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jjo Online   content
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Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 636
Loc: Chicago
Had the pleasure of hearing Chick Corea list night with his new band, Vigil. I was prepared not to love it, because I was not crazy about the Return to Foreever reunion concert I saw a couple of years ago, and this looked to be a similar sounding band. What I didn't like about RTF, however, was that some of the players seemed to be on ego trips, playing showy, fast, and pointless passages.

Anyway, I loved the concert last night. His band has drums, percussion (separate player), guitar, sax, bass, and of course Chick on keyboards. It was a powerful group, but Chick played mostly acoustic piano. The band was rhythmically very powerful. At times during the guitar or piano solos, Chick played cowbell instead of comping on the piano.

Chick's playing (and this included heads, solos AND comping) was a marvel of creativity and incisiveness. No extra notes, and a great sense of playfulness. The band must average 40 years younger than him, and he seemed to love the excitement of playing with a this group. The energy was tremendous, aided by the fact that this was a small club with maybe 300 patrons.

If this band comes to your town, I'd highly recommend it.

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#2130388 - 08/09/13 12:58 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jjo Online   content
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Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 636
Loc: Chicago
As for comping, I agree with jazzwee and would add this from my teacher: comping should be in multi-bar phrases that are pleasant to listen to on their own. This means focusing on the top note of the voicing so that they create a melody of sorts. This is very hard to do, and is something I work on just like I work on soloing.

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#2130481 - 08/09/13 04:38 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: knotty]
The Wind Offline
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Registered: 05/28/13
Posts: 468
Originally Posted By: knotty
Wind,
I agree with you. Add rhythm to the equation also. Imho, much more important than cool sound voicings is varied rhythms, always in the pocket.


without proper rhythm there is no jazz! that's why I can't stand classical music anymore.

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#2131062 - 08/11/13 01:29 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: chrisbell]
charleslang Offline
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Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 2080
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
There's a whole world, nay, a whole universe inside of one chord; you just have to spend time to get in there. It's not easy, takes patience. But it's well worth the effort.


I love that way of thinking. It makes me think of how Keith Jarrett can go forever on one or two chords.

Recently I was playing with a friend and he made up a vamp on two chords on guitar, and I did soloing over it for a while on piano. We always record our playing . . . So here I am trying to explore a corner of the universe you mention:

_________________________
Charles Lang
Working on: A Night in Tunisia; Memories of Tomorrow (Keith Jarrett).
Just started: Brazilian Like (Michel Petrucciani)

Baldwin Model R (1974), Hardman 5'9" grand (1915), Rieger-Kloss 42.5" vertical

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#2131103 - 08/11/13 06:05 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
Mark Polishook Offline
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Registered: 11/29/12
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Loc: Leicester, UK
Steve Lacy, the American soprano saxophone player who spent most of his professional life in Paris, used to talk about doing stuff like spending 30 minutes exploring one note on his soprano. Or the same kind of time frame on two notes (an interval). He had something like a deck of cards each of which had the name of ONE note on the saxophone. So he would do something like pull out a random card and that was the note for special practice on that particular day.

This is excellent stuff for discussion and practice ... It's true the saxophone isn't a piano ... or a piano isn't a saxophone. But it's a thought- and sound-provoking approach ...

(and charleslang) ... very nice demonstration!


Edited by Mark Polishook (08/11/13 06:08 AM)

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#2131109 - 08/11/13 06:29 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
beeboss Offline
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Registered: 07/18/09
Posts: 1201
Loc: uk south
I do something a bit like that, some cards have a keynote, others have a tonality (mode or scale maybe) and others have a rhythm. I use these to generate random musical ideas which can provide something to practice or ideas for composition or for musical games (for jamming). Turning over cards at random can give me Db harmonic major in 11/4, and I could easily practice on that for half an hour. I got this idea from Kenny Werner
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#2131229 - 08/11/13 01:01 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
chrisbell Offline
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Whom maybe got it from Brian Eno, who maybe got it from the Fluxus movement . .I remember from an obscure lecture in the 70's that Satie had a stack of cards with different chords on them. Random games using building blocks have been used throughout western history; "Musikalisches W├╝rfelspiel".

But not so much within the jazz world. It's a great tool for breaking out of the mould.
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#2131231 - 08/11/13 01:07 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: charleslang]
chrisbell Offline
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Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 1361
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
Originally Posted By: charleslang
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
There's a whole world, nay, a whole universe inside of one chord; you just have to spend time to get in there. It's not easy, takes patience. But it's well worth the effort.
I love that way of thinking . . .

I picked it up from Pat Harbison at his theory class during the Aebersold jazz camp last year.
He spoke of practising a tune by taking one chord at a time and working on it for a week. Then the next chord, etc. The idea is to let the colour (timbre) of the chord/scale sink in. After getting two chords done, then its time to work on the harmonic movement between them. And then three chords etc. So after a couple of months the tune in question is done. smile

The tip is to use a drone playing/holding the root.
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#2131269 - 08/11/13 02:36 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: chrisbell]
beeboss Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/18/09
Posts: 1201
Loc: uk south
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
Whom maybe got it from Brian Eno, who maybe got it from the Fluxus movement . .I remember from an obscure lecture in the 70's that Satie had a stack of cards with different chords on them. Random games using building blocks have been used throughout western history; "Musikalisches W├╝rfelspiel".



There is nothing truly new under the sun. Creativity is just juggling established chunks into a slightly different order.
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#2131370 - 08/11/13 06:46 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: charleslang]
jazzwee Offline
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Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7096
Loc: So. California
Originally Posted By: charleslang







That was really enjoyable to listen to Charles! And the piano was recorded so well so that added to the beauty.

I've been inspired to dig deeper into playing over one chord all week. And I realized that thought was to be placed on tension and release (resolution). Resolving is a difficult concept to figure out though in a vamp, particularly a Sus7 vamp, or a Dorian vamp.

Anybody have any theory on this? What to your ears sounds like resolution in a Vamp? The tension part is easy.

As McCoy Tyner and even Kenny Werner has demonstrated, you can play other chords in the vamp to create movement, whether diatonic or chromatic. And I suppose if the Bass player is playing something more open, one can be free to change the chord quality as well.

I just wanted a discussion going as to what goes on in everybody's head when doing these vamps.
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#2131389 - 08/11/13 07:54 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
charleslang Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 2080
Originally Posted By: jazzwee
Originally Posted By: charleslang







That was really enjoyable to listen to Charles! And the piano was recorded so well so that added to the beauty.


Thank you for watching and for your positive feedback. I have experimented with a bunch of different mics, and a few ways of processing, before I felt like I could get a somewhat true-to-life recording of the attack part of the piano sound, in particular.

Originally Posted By: jazzwee


I've been inspired to dig deeper into playing over one chord all week. And I realized that thought was to be placed on tension and release (resolution). Resolving is a difficult concept to figure out though in a vamp, particularly a Sus7 vamp, or a Dorian vamp.

Anybody have any theory on this? What to your ears sounds like resolution in a Vamp? The tension part is easy.


Your post made me wonder how Keith Jarrett ends his vamps/drones. I checked one of them (below), and noticed that he ends it with actually a few new chords, faintly (around 4:38) to give it resolution.

With dorian and sus7 vamps, I played around just now and agree with you that they're hard to resolve; I think it's because they sound like they're already in tension. The sixth in dorian (for example a D-natural in F dorian) has that effect; also the suspended note in a sus-7 does.

I found that I had some success if I draw attention toward tension in the right hand just before resolving at the ending. So, for example when playing a sus7 as a drone on the left hand, using the improvised melody of the right hand to highlight the sixth (hit it loud, or a bunch of times, or noodle around it). Or, in a dorian drone, highlighting the fourth. Then at the very ending, resolving the right hand to the root, or third etc.

The idea in any case would be to draw the attention to something that actually can be resolved; since we're assuming that one does not resolve the tension that is inherent in the drone. (In other words: assuming one doesn't do what Keith Jarrett does below, where he plays something that's not the drone at all, at the ending). But of course, his solution seems to work well, too.

_________________________
Charles Lang
Working on: A Night in Tunisia; Memories of Tomorrow (Keith Jarrett).
Just started: Brazilian Like (Michel Petrucciani)

Baldwin Model R (1974), Hardman 5'9" grand (1915), Rieger-Kloss 42.5" vertical

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#2131400 - 08/11/13 08:32 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jazzwee Offline
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Registered: 04/25/07
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Loc: So. California
Charles, appreciating the discussion here. KJ's vamp though is V-I so he has more freedom here to resolve. I can hear his lines outlining a V chord and of course those outside lines will suggest a dominant tension. In any case, the I chord can be outlined and thus suggest a resolution.

Do you know of a KJ tune where he vamps on a minor?

I think one almost has to have some basis in theory for how to approach some of these vamps. I remember when I first started playing So What that the ability to play every white note was actually bad. It was so directionless. I just figured (then) that if I played anything fast enough it wouldn't matter.



Then I heard Pettruciani and was amazed at the melodies he was creating on So What. It clearly sounds like he is thinking about about Tension and Release. He is resolving his lines.

Eye (Ear?) opener.

Now in an F7sus vamp like Passion Dance, it sounds like McCoy Tyner is just using the root and staying on it for a moment as a resolution moment. He does it quite frequently with a strong LH chord sounding just the root. So Perhaps that's his approach. Would be nice to hear comments from those that are more expert.



Edited by jazzwee (08/11/13 08:34 PM)
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#2131438 - 08/11/13 10:18 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jjo Online   content
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Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 636
Loc: Chicago
Love the Petruciani cut. I hear rhythm and dynamics playing a big role in shaping his lines. Density of notes trailing off to notes with lots of space is a form of tension and release. Same for increasing and decreasing the volume. He seems to use these techniques to create lines just as much as harmonic resolution.

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#2131447 - 08/11/13 10:47 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jjo]
jazzwee Offline
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Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7096
Loc: So. California
Originally Posted By: jjo
Love the Petruciani cut. I hear rhythm and dynamics playing a big role in shaping his lines. Density of notes trailing off to notes with lots of space is a form of tension and release. Same for increasing and decreasing the volume. He seems to use these techniques to create lines just as much as harmonic resolution.


Interesting observation!
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#2131507 - 08/12/13 01:45 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
charleslang Offline
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Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 2080
Originally Posted By: jazzwee


Do you know of a KJ tune where he vamps on a minor?



No, I don't. I know Dave Frank has one in minor called 'Midtown 9am'. I don't have the cd handy, but now I'm curious how he does tension and resolution (maybe I'll find the cd).

I have done a recording improvising over that vamp. When I was recording it, I never thought of tension and resolution, but now, watching my video, I'm seeing that I'm doing the tension and resolution mainly using single note melodies on my right hand, something a little like what Petrucciani is doing in the video you posted.

The piece is one chord, Fminor7 I think, for a while and then DF shifts the whole thing a minor third down for a while, to Dminor7, and then comes back. (In my cover I just stayed in Fminor7 the whole time.)

In all these cases of vamps, I guess I'm getting the feeling that there is tension and resolution but it's got a different feel than with chord changes. It's like the resolution is a slightly less satisfying kind. On the other hand I feel like vamps are easier listening.

This is my cover of the vamp that I mentioned:

_________________________
Charles Lang
Working on: A Night in Tunisia; Memories of Tomorrow (Keith Jarrett).
Just started: Brazilian Like (Michel Petrucciani)

Baldwin Model R (1974), Hardman 5'9" grand (1915), Rieger-Kloss 42.5" vertical

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#2131595 - 08/12/13 08:40 AM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
Mark Polishook Offline
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Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 674
Loc: Leicester, UK
CharlesLang ... could you possibly post details about how you mike your piano. The sound is very good and coming across very clearly. I know there are others on this forum who can give general advice about piano miking ... would be interested to hear ..

Jazzwee ... one way forward on ow to play over vamps and one chord might be to post a lick or two that you like from McCoy's Passion Dance solo (were you able to get it from Scribd or elsewhere?) and discuss.

Well, ok smile .... here's a short excerpt.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/19895150/passiondance.png

MT begins the phrase so it's grounded over F7 or mixolydian or whatever anyone wants to call it. In the 4th measure of the excerpt his RH goes up so that he's working from a Gb major pentatonic scale, although, as with the F7 it can be called by other names. The concept is he's playing 1/2 higher than the original key. I know some teachers and authors call this step-stepping and things like that.

One way forward w/this kind of stuff is take however much of that lick you like and play it in a bunch of keys. Or take the lick and see what happens if instead of stepping up a 1/2 step you go up a whole step. Or really any interval. I read somewhere that Joe Henderson said when he wanted to go "outside" he's just play EVERYTHING up a whole step! I wish I could find that ...


A few posts back you wrote "if the Bass player is playing something more open, one can be free to change the chord quality as well."

That's totally spot-on and is very common. Like all else it's a question of agreement and cooperation on the bandstand.

Hope this helps ...



Mark

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#2131728 - 08/12/13 12:01 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jazzwee Offline
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Registered: 04/25/07
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Loc: So. California
Hey Mark, thanks for that snippet post. Now this part I already knew. In fact, I've been applying that in the recordings I did. McCoy plays the fourth (quartal) voicing moving it around usually in half steps to any point or moving it in perfect 4ths. Then his RH follows by playing the triad shape.

What my question though was that it seemed to be that playing Mixolydian, or any non-scale shape that implies ALT are tension raising sounds. I found that that tension has to be released somehow and I'm realizing now that the great players don't just raise the tension for 10 minutes. Good solos on a Vamp seem to need a thoughtful release/resolution.

Since this is a Vamp, there is no V-I to take advantage of. In Passion Dance, it appears that McCoy's way is to hit that Root note only (sounded doubled) and just pound on it a few times before he heads off again to raise tension. Thus I presume playing a Root suggests an F Maj sound. At least this was his approach in an F7sus vamp.

Listening to Pettruciani one can also hear him resolve his Dorian vamp lines. Now at least in Dorian, one can actually move the LH to the I chord (without following the bass player). I wonder if that resolves it.

But beyond all that, I was wondering what you and others actually use as an approach to resolve a Vamp line (based on cumulative knowledge), particularly Minor and Sus4 vamps.
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#2131750 - 08/12/13 12:25 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
Mark Polishook Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 674
Loc: Leicester, UK
Originally Posted By: jazzwee
McCoy plays the fourth (quartal) voicing moving it around usually in half steps to any point or moving it in perfect 4ths. Then his RH follows by playing the triad shape.



Excellent ... you got a base and it's a good one.

Originally Posted By: jazzwee


What my question though was that it seemed to be that playing Mixolydian, or any non-scale shape that implies ALT are tension raising sounds. I found that that tension has to be released somehow and I'm realizing now that the great players don't just raise the tension for 10 minutes. Good solos on a Vamp seem to need a thoughtful release/resolution.



You're right. So one of the tricks is to see how the McCoy that you know also applies to this other scenario you've just described.

Maybe another way to say that is if we changed a few words about the ALT scenario your description and observations could just as well apply to McCoy in Passion Dance.

In other words, McCoy shows us in that snippet that he's establishing a tonality, moving outside of it and then returning to it. The triads and pentatonics - that incidental. It's part of his style but it's the larger idea of starting inside moving outside and coming back inside that's important.

A different way to say this is he gives us 3 measures of inside and 1 measure of outside and then he comes back inside. So from my point of view this 3:1 ratio also solves the ALT scenario you describe. "Solves" in the sense of we get that ALT scenario up and running pretty easily with the ratio of inside/outside taken from McCoy.

But of course there are other ways ....

Originally Posted By: jazzwee


Since this is a Vamp, there is no V-I to take advantage of. In Passion Dance, it appears that McCoy's way is to hit that Root note only (sounded doubled) and just pound on it a few times before he heads off again to raise tension. Thus I presume playing a Root suggests an F Maj sound. At least this was his approach in an F7sus vamp.



I know what you mean. But maybe here's another way to look at it, which is: there's no V-I to take advantage of. But there is that 3:1 consonance-to-dissonance ratio. And V-I when it comes down to it is just another dissonance (V) resolving to I.

So there are a million other solutions. But just to make sure we're getting as much as we can out of this one I'm really banging on that McCoy example. And the example says: Play three measures of inside stuff. Play one measure of outside stuff. Come back inside!

Of course there are a million subtle ways to do all of this, thus Petrruciani as you describe ...

Originally Posted By: jazzwee


But beyond all that, I was wondering what you and others actually use as an approach to resolve a Vamp line (based on cumulative knowledge), particularly Minor and Sus4 vamps.



To practice this stuff I would do exactly as I'm describing in the sense of (1) isolate some larger concept from something I like and (b) figure out how to practice it in some that's meaningful to me. I know this is pretty wide open but that's the way I would go at it. But the rub of course is you have what you're hearing in your head so my description might only take you part of the way there. But you could, for example, fine an excerpt that goes right to the sound you'd like to hear and then figure out the big concept there ... at least that's what I'd suggest.

Then on a gig it all happens the way you've been describing as with your bass player. Someone takes a liberty. Someone else responds. Before you know it if everyone's in sync magic happens. If one person in the group misses a cue the magic stops! So everyone resets and starts again!

But that's what makes it all fun!

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#2131763 - 08/12/13 12:47 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
jazzwee Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7096
Loc: So. California
Great information Mark. Was that accurate? 3:1 Inside to outside? I'd have to listen again but I would have guessed 5:1.

Now with McCoy though you said he was playing Mixolydian tonality. Not reading the transcription to verify but just listening to him, I would generally say that he uses quartal tonality which would deemphasize the 3rd, instead emphasizing 4th intervals. This of course would give the chords a non-Mixolydian quality which doesn't necessarily require resolution. So perhaps that's part of the theory there. In essence, tension and release being handled in other ways like movement vs. non movement, inside vs. outside, open-playing vs. more dense, and less on harmonic progression, etc.

Obviously trying to pin down how resolution feels to each of us is moving target. But I think NOT thinking about resolution creates a poor solo. I watched a concert with world-class players and they had a guest sax player who was a new member of the faculty. Fantastic chops and sound but the solos were drawn out wanking sessions. There was no "release". He paled in comparison to the big names next to him and obviously the balance of tension and release was automatic to masters.

I'm glad I'm realizing this now since the approach is totally different with a functional progression.
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#2131804 - 08/12/13 01:52 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: jazzwee]
chrisbell Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 1361
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
Side note: interesting with 3:1
I have been told by a couple of old-school jazz cats that when soloing on a Blues; play 3 bars, rest 1.
_________________________

I never play anything the same way once.

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#2131825 - 08/12/13 02:23 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: chrisbell]
knotty Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/01/07
Posts: 2993
Loc: Bethesda, MD (Washington D.C)
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
Side note: interesting with 3:1
I have been told by a couple of old-school jazz cats that when soloing on a Blues; play 3 bars, rest 1.

I've been looking to do a duet CD with Kenny Barron. But since he was a little bit over my budget, I told him I'd pay 75% of the fee. He'll play the first 3 bars, and I'll play the 4th etc...

Let's see how that turns out.

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#2131842 - 08/12/13 02:54 PM Re: Jazz Study Group 2: Advanced Players [Re: knotty]
chrisbell Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 1361
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
Originally Posted By: knotty
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
Side note: interesting with 3:1
I have been told by a couple of old-school jazz cats that when soloing on a Blues; play 3 bars, rest 1.
I've been looking to do a duet CD with Kenny Barron. But since he was a little bit over my budget, I told him I'd pay 75% of the fee. He'll play the first 3 bars, and I'll play the 4th etc...Let's see how that turns out.
It all depends which bar you play in.
_________________________

I never play anything the same way once.

https://soundcloud.com/chrisb/sets
https://www.youtube.com/user/djboing/videos

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