Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
#1339319 - 01/02/10 04:16 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: RPD]
Bob Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/01/01
Posts: 3834
The stores were not supposed to sell LaPetite grands - they were priced to get the customer in the store, where the salesman was supposed to convince the customer to buy a more expensive instrument. I remember them priced at $1999, then $2599, then $2999. The price might have hit $3999 before production ended, but I don't remember exactly. Given the price point, the quality is better than some.


Edited by Bob (01/02/10 04:17 PM)
_________________________
www.PianoTunerOrlando.com






Top
(ad PTG 568) Win a Year Journal Subscription
PTG 57th Annual Convention - Atlanta
#1339414 - 01/02/10 06:36 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Bob]
Sam Casey Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/05/05
Posts: 1135
Loc: SW Missouri
Yes, Dan, the removable brass spring loaded flange that would crack at the screw. Pain to install. Seemed like the oak case, plaster carving and brass flanges ran togther. Plus 3/4 plate with that birds eye maple veneering on the top of the block that would crack and look terrible. Block would look like it was shot thru with cracks but be just fine.

Top
#1341973 - 01/06/10 12:04 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Sam Casey]
Mario Bruneau Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/16/06
Posts: 133
Loc: Québec, Canada
I find it so strange so many piano technicians have so much different opinions on Kimball pianos. What is wrong? The piano or the technicians? This case should be unanimous.
In my 35 years experience, I have yet to find a "decent" Kimball. Even one vienese edition I had to service for a music college was a "real" joke. The hammer rail completely split in half and cost the college $1000CAD in the 80s to fix! Must I give note to this community that Kimball's relation with Bosendörfer was because Kimball bought Bosendörfer because they where in a bad situation. Thank god, Yamaha bought it (Bosendörfer) recently. I think it is a good match.

So, Kimball is one of the worst piano ever. I never suggested any clients of mine to purchase one. Stay away from them I would tell them.

And guest what? Will I invest the same amount of work on a bad piano has on a good one? No. Why? Because I will work harder on the bad piano to make it sound at its best. It can take two hours to tune it but it will be 100% of its capabilities. As I wrote earlier on this post, I'm passionate about pianos and would never compromise because the piano is a piece of junk. When I finish with it, it will behave.

Come on guys! A bad piano IS a bad piano. If we piano tuner-tech can not make the difference, who will? How can any customer have faith in you as a tech if you can't make any difference between a good and a bad piano? How good will that be for your client? Do you think you are helping your client by "being polite"? People hire us because we are *specialists*, they din't invite us to a cocktail party! They have to rely on someone no? They have faith in you, respect that.

I don't think it is *honest* for any technician to *pretend* the client's piano is *ok* when it is crap. I have only one word = HONESTY
I have a big passion tuning piano and servicing them and I LOVE pianos because I'm a pianist but I ate a bad piano, why not?
The sophisticated lady to whom you tell her piano is *ok* when it is not, do you really think she will believe you when you tell her when *another* piano is very good even if it is? People are not that dum. Stop treating your clients like if they where children or retarded, it is not respectful for them.

Sorry but I (will) stand by my opinion no matter how bad you write back to me and I know you will.


Edited by Mario Bruneau (01/06/10 12:47 AM)

Top
#1343534 - 01/07/10 10:13 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Mario Bruneau]
James Scott Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/22/09
Posts: 158
Loc: Phoenix, AZ
I'm am in agreement with Mario in that sometimes a bad piano IS a bad piano. Like any other produce in any other market you have to call a spade a "spade". However, I also agree with Bob Bremmer in that if you approach any servicing with the idea that the piano is crap you'll never service your customer the way you ought to. It's up to the technician to give it the best work they can. The customer is expecting that. And unless they're really into this stuff, most people don't really have any clue as to how good (or bad) their piano is, especially if it's like an old family heirloom or something, and they are expecting that when a tuner comes into service it then they're going to get it back to sounding like it belongs on the concert stage. If their piano is less than great then you should give them reasonable expectations about what the final results should be. Customers will be much more cool with that than a tech who gives it only a half-assed job and makes them feel like they're being jipped.

I'm only an amatuer in this area but I know that in customer service you're paid to give the best service to your customer that you can. They're expecting you to offer it regardless of how good their hardware is.

Top
#1343548 - 01/07/10 10:29 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: James Scott]
James Scott Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/22/09
Posts: 158
Loc: Phoenix, AZ
RPD,

In a post in this thread on 12/30 you'd mentioned Cable in with Whitney, kimball, etc. I know that it's not super great, but I thought that Cable made a very decent instrument in their day. I've got a 5' from 1929 and it seems very sound. Has anybody had an experience with this brand from that pre-depression age, and can they give me any honest opinions of them (not that RPD's is wrong or dishonest)? I just have no other experiences to go by.

Thanks,
James

Top
#1343557 - 01/07/10 10:44 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: James Scott]
Bob Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/01/01
Posts: 3834
Pre Depression pianos from many makers were better than their efforts in the 50's to 80's. Aeolian bought up many good names and quality suffered in some of those starting about 1960. Post depression, it depends who made the Cable = Aeolian built Cables were not as good as Cable made Cables. I like Everett made Cables the best.
_________________________
www.PianoTunerOrlando.com






Top
#1343634 - 01/08/10 01:02 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Bob]
James Scott Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/22/09
Posts: 158
Loc: Phoenix, AZ
Bob,

Mine is from The Cable Company, Chicago, from the late 20's. I've seen Hobart M Cable, Conover Cable, and Cable & Sons though. As I understand, Aeolian bought them in the mid 30's along with several others and ran them all into the ground.

Thanks for your input,
James

Top
#1343933 - 01/08/10 12:30 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Dan Casdorph]
Plowboy Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/26/08
Posts: 2277
Loc: Huntington Beach, CA
Originally Posted By: Dan Casdorph
The older Chicago ones were good quality, but time has taken its toll. The French Lickers were not so good.


Hey, buddy! My sister worked for Kimball there finishing cabinets, so watch it. smile
_________________________
Gary Schenk

Top
#1345905 - 01/10/10 04:25 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Terry Benge Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 120
Loc: Southeastern Ky
Like you, I have seen some junk Kimballs. However, working for a Kimball dealer from 1974-1988 I encountered some very stable units as well. The dealer sold around 80 pianos per year before a fire destroyed his business. I still service alot of those pianos today. I was at the factory several times for seminars. Kimball never claimed to be the best piano, just the best piano for the money.
_________________________
PTG Associate
Steinway Studio
Yamaha CP300

Top
#1358324 - 01/26/10 04:13 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Terry Benge]
b3groover Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/05/08
Posts: 119
Loc: Lansing, MI
Sorry it has taken me awhile to get back to this topic.

For the record, I never insult my clients by telling them their piano is crap. I don't care who they are or what they paid for the piano or how bad it is. Especially now... the economy in Michigan is at an all-time low, unemployment is at an all-time high. I am grateful for every piano I tune.

If they ask, I will tell them what the issues are from a purely technical point of view or if they don't ask I will point out any blatant, pressing repairs that should be made. But I never say "This piano is junk!" And I never judge a piano until I get it apart, inspect it and begin to tune it. If the piano truly is junk, I will tell them the objective issues that are wrong with the piano, not subjective issues such as tone.

I started this thread because I have honestly never tuned a Kimball that sounded very good and I remember my dad jokingly complaining about them as well. I thought perhaps other technicians would share their experiences with them.

Just last week I tuned a late 60s / early 70s 6' Kimball grand for a church. I've tuned it before over a year ago and considering the heat isn't always on and it is used every week multiple times a week, the tuning had held pretty well. It was only about 10 cents flat. The overall tone of the piano is pretty good but it has a lot of false beats in the strings. Did I complain to the pastor? Of course not. I tuned the piano and fixed two keys that were not working for free because they are good clients. And then I played a bit for them, got paid, had a nice conversation, and went on my way.

I take each piano on a case by case basis. Most of my clientèle are hobbyist or have small children who are just beginning to play. It does't really matter how good or bad the piano is in those instances. But I recently had a new client who was purchasing a used piano and had to decide between two consoles. After hearing her play and learning her background, I steered her towards the more expensive option because I knew she'd be happier in the long run. And so far so good.

We deal with what we get! I hope to get a good sounding Kimball one of these days! smile


Edited by b3groover (01/26/10 04:16 AM)
_________________________
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Jim Alfredson
Musician / Tuner
www.organissimo.org

Top
#1358327 - 01/26/10 04:19 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Olek Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7247
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: b3groover


Most of my clientèle are hobbyist or have small children who are just beginning to play. It does't really matter how good or bad the piano is in those instances.


After seen how many of the low grade pianos un regulated and badly voicied are sold after a few years because the childs did not progress, I begin to relate the 2 facts.

I suggest that children, most probably, hear better than us, aniway the one who have a good ear is more annoyed to be obliged to play on a harsh sounding piano than the one that knows how to play a little and can imagine music in his head.
_________________________
Isaac OLEG - http://picasaweb.google.fr/PianoOleg pro

Top
#1359979 - 01/28/10 01:43 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Olek]
b3groover Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/05/08
Posts: 119
Loc: Lansing, MI
Today I tuned a Jansenn console.

Wow.

The client was so nice. I felt bad telling her that the pinblock was shot. You could see the cracks from the TOP of the pinblock. And some of the main vertical supports were pulling away from the rest of the frame.

It was fun to tune, let me tell you. smile
_________________________
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Jim Alfredson
Musician / Tuner
www.organissimo.org

Top
#1936052 - 08/01/12 09:31 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Brewski50 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/02/12
Posts: 2
I have a 1900-era Kimball, style 8, beautiful carving in oak. I 'm considering restoring--any thoughts would be appreciated.

Top
#1936194 - 08/02/12 06:42 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Loren D Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/22/10
Posts: 2546
Loc: PA
I've worked on a bunch of old Kimball uprights that are still sounding and playing well. I have to say, I never really don't mind Kimball. I keep them in perspective for what they are: a home piano for the average every day piano owner. Yes, I've had some bad ones, but I'd be hard pressed to name a brand that I didn't have issues with from time to time.

Remember those old Marantz spinets made in the 70's-80's? They had a bunch of different names: Grand, Kinkaid, Marantz, etc. I know some techs complain about them too. There are a bunch of them around here from a high profile dealer (now out of business) who sold a ton of them. Really not bad pianos as far as spinets go.
_________________________
DiGiorgi Piano Service (1984-2013)
http://www.digiorgipiano.com

Top
#1936238 - 08/02/12 08:26 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Ryan Hassell Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 07/07/09
Posts: 428
Loc: Farmington, MO
I agree Loren! I service several Kimball Consoles. They all have a great tone and very rarely break strings during a pitch raise. I guess I may be a little sentimental though, when I told my parents I wanted to learn to play the piano when I was twelve, the only piano they could afford was a Kimball. Most of the Kimballs I service are consoles from the 1980s. We only have one music store here in these parts. It has been in existence since the 1940's. I can tell what they were selling by what pianos are around here. In the 40'-50's they sold Wurlitzers, in the 60's Story and Clarks, in the 80's Kimballs, in the 90's Baldwins. Since the market for new pianos is very little around here now, they don't even keep new pianos in stock anymore. Kind of sad.
_________________________
Ryan G. Hassell
Hassell's Piano Tuning
Farmington, MO
www.hassellspianotuning.com
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hassells-Piano-Tuning/163155880804
ryanhassell@hotmail.com

Top
#1936257 - 08/02/12 09:18 AM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Bill Bremmer RPT Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/02
Posts: 3186
Loc: Madison, WI USA
The Kimball factory gave me one of the best opportunities I ever had up to that time in 1982 to do a training session at their Factory in Indiana. Sure, there were some problems with workmanship and materials in a few of their pianos but by now, any of those failed instruments have mostly been discarded. I will gladly work on any Kimball piano at any time.

I believe they are examples of good quality, American craftsmanship that were available to the public at an affordable price. Many of them will be worth restoration at some point as will be some of the other pianos which technicians have loved to hate over the years such as Acrosonics. Kimballs have the most solid pinblocks and crack proof soundboards that were ever made. With new hammers and re-scaling, what were once considered the bane of piano technicians could become true gems of American piano building tradition.

Today, technicians can make good money replacing the rubber grommets on the spinet models and have happy customers. If you prefer to only work on Steinways, fine, good luck to you finding an exclusively Steinway and other fine grand clientele. If you don't live in an area where that would be possible, you would have to move there to get it, then good luck with the competition to get it once you do!

Recently, I tuned for the second time in six months a Kimball console piano that had been among the very last of those built (1996) and was purchased as a used instrument from a the original owner. When I went to appraise it, I found an instrument in perfect condition, inside and out. It did not even need cleaning inside and the case looked brand new. It needed only a pitch raise of about 30 cents.

I did that pitch raise when the customer got the piano. The tuning pins were as firm as they could be and the action was in perfect regulation. A few weeks ago, I tuned it again and it was still up to pitch as I expected. The family has been quite delighted with their purchase that they had made at a very favorable price.

The man owned a fine guitar which I tuned for him and also wrote down the specs. He was delighted with the way it sounded and the daughter remarked as he played, "That sounds really good, Dad!".

The last thing I would ever consider would be to move to some large city and try to compete in a rat race such as that just so I could only service fine quality grands. I get enough of them here in any case but somehow, what I can do for ordinary pianos is more gratifying to me and my clients. Perhaps it is because I see the value in these instruments whereas other technicians have left their clients feeling something negative about the piano which is a part of their home and family and probably always will be.
_________________________
Bill Bremmer RPT
Madison WI USA
www.billbremmer.com

Top
#1936335 - 08/02/12 12:32 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: RPD]
Del Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/03
Posts: 5183
Loc: Olympia, Washington
Originally Posted By: RPD
I found a 9 foot (probably 8 1/2) Kimball grand, in original condition C-1920 (its on my wall, and I can't remember the specs as I write this! lol)

The owners tried to give it to me. I thought about it, and offered them $500. Plus it cost me about that again to move it to my shop. I'll rebuild it someday, and then I'll have a full sized. Its got tone that is stil unbelievable!!

My own experience with Kimball pianos has been mixed, like those above. But, I've generally found that the older the Kimball, the better I like it.

I rebuilt one of these for a small high school way out in the middle of nowhere. They didn’t have the budget for a new concert grand of any variety and, besides, the piano had been a donation from a well-known local “benefactor.” They were pretty much stuck with it.

It had its quirks—the most significant being a roughly 3/8th inch gap between the top of the pinblock and the bottom of the plate tuning pin panel (easily fixed when fitting the new pinblock)—but overall not a bad piano. It surprised more than a few skeptics with its action performance and its tone. It didn’t rank up there among the best concert grands ever built but it was a way long distance from the worst. And this was back before I’d started doing much of any redesign work on pianos like this. Looking back I’ve wondered what the piano would have sounded like with a few simple scale changes and a couple of modifications to the soundboard. Add in a set of WN&G wippens and shanks along with some Ronsen/Weikert (or Abel “Natural-felt/medium) hammers and you’ll have a quite nice piano. You’ll be sorry you waited so long.

I agree, though, in general the older the Kimball, the better. I’ve encountered more than a few quite nice old Kimball uprights and grands.. And, as someone else has already mentioned, their Viennese Edition grands could also be quite nice. They were the sleeper bargains of the day; with just a little careful prep work they could compete with much more expensive pianos. And they are still decent pianos, they seem to age well given even a modicum of attention.

ddf
_________________________
Delwin D Fandrich
Piano Research, Design & Manufacturing Consultant
ddfandrich@gmail.com
(To contact me privately please use this e-mail address.)

Stupidity is a rare condition, ignorance is a common choice. --Anon

Top
#1936341 - 08/02/12 12:39 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
OperaTenor Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/13/06
Posts: 2379
Loc: Sandy Eggo, California
IMO, pre-Depression era Kimball's were generally well-made. After that, not so much, but certainly not the worst.

Winter spinet, with the aluminum plate and particle board soundboard(or was it plywood?). Need I say more?
_________________________
Happiness is a freshly tuned piano.
Jim Boydston, proprietor, No Piano Left Behind - technician
[url=www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind]www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind[/url]

Top
#1936415 - 08/02/12 03:26 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
Loren D Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/22/10
Posts: 2546
Loc: PA
I'll tell you though, when it comes to spinets, those 40's-50's Wurlitzer and Acrosonics have incredibly good tone for pianos that size.
_________________________
DiGiorgi Piano Service (1984-2013)
http://www.digiorgipiano.com

Top
#1936442 - 08/02/12 04:33 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: Loren D]
OperaTenor Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/13/06
Posts: 2379
Loc: Sandy Eggo, California
Originally Posted By: Loren D
I'll tell you though, when it comes to spinets, those 40's-50's Wurlitzer and Acrosonics have incredibly good tone for pianos that size.


I agree.
_________________________
Happiness is a freshly tuned piano.
Jim Boydston, proprietor, No Piano Left Behind - technician
[url=www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind]www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind[/url]

Top
#1936453 - 08/02/12 04:51 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: b3groover]
That Guy Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/07/11
Posts: 390
Loc: Lincoln, NE
Quote:
I'll tell you though, when it comes to spinets, those 40's-50's Wurlitzer and Acrosonics have incredibly good tone for pianos that size.


I agree!

I'll weigh in on the Kimball thing: Many times I compare pianos to cars when a customer asks what I think of their piano. I'm going to show my age here but I would compare a Kimball to a Ford Pinto or Chevy Chevette. Some were pretty decent and got good gas mileage but if you expected it to drive like a Cadillac, forget it. It is what it is. As long as people keep that in mind we're okay.
_________________________
Scott Kerns
"That Tuning Guy"
Lincoln, NE
www.thattuningguy.com

Top
#1936934 - 08/03/12 02:52 PM Re: Did Kimball ever make good pianos? [Re: 88Key_PianoPlayer]
Del Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/03
Posts: 5183
Loc: Olympia, Washington
Originally Posted By: 88Key_PianoPlayer
Wow! I'm amazed at the rave reviews I'm reading of the Kimball LaPetite grands! (well, unless I misunderstood :p) In my opinion, though, their tone generally leaves a LOT to be desired, ESPECIALLY in the bass! I'd rather hear a Baldwin Acrosonic than any LaPetites I've ever played. One particular one I played at a retirement home my grandma lived in at the time was absolutely NO MATCH for my 57" 1913 upright, in spite of its having completely worn hammers almost down to the molding (with grooves deeper than the thickness of the strings)! Now, if someone knows of a LaPetite with a bass that would run circles around a fully-rebuilt (INCLUDING new soundboard, and whatever else would be replaced when doing a rebuild that extensive) turn-of-the-19th-to-20th-century full-size upright, I'd like to know about it. smile

Fortunately not everyone judges the worth of a piano by the criteria you use. Different people look for different things in many of the products they buy and use. And these criteria evolve and change of the years and decades just as our society changes and evolves.

There are reasons why the large 57” upright piano faded into oblivion and not all of them have anything to do with music. Those things were/are huge! They dominate the visual space wherever they are located. Yes, they can have a big, strong bass but the tone quality of the lowest few notes in the bass are not that important to all musicians. At least it is not so important as to sacrifice the aesthetic balance of the room just to satisfy the ear on those rare occasions when it is called on.

The Kimball La Petite grand was not, by any measure, the world’s greatest example of the piano maker’s art. Yet it filled a definite need at the time. I once rebuilt the action in one of these things—and I mean really rebuilt with new felt and leather in place of the original foam garbage and new, more appropriate regulating screws and buttons in place of the disastrous components originally used—for a young woman who had pretty much trashed it during her first year as a music major at Portland State University. The piano wasn’t designed or built for that kind of service either. But she needed a grand to practice on and that was literally the only piano that would fit in her tiny little “efficiency” apartment. Still, with its new action it went on to serve her needs well for the next three years of college and then on into her teaching studio as her second grand piano. That compact grand action worked pretty well given decent materials and components. The piano also sounded pretty good in its intended environment. The bass, of course, was weak and indistinct but through most of the compass of the piano—where most piano music is actually played—it sounded quite decent. Clearly her criteria for judging the worth of a piano were different from yours. She thought they important, though.

Another piano you would be quite contemptuous of is the little Young Chang 150—yes, as in 4’ 11”—grand that was on display at the recent PTG convention in Bellingham, WA. You’d compare the lowest few bass notes with those of your grandmother’s 57” upright and turn your nose up at the whole idea of the piano. You’d miss the fact that through most of the scale it was a quite nice musical instrument. And because of its combination of diminutive size and its musicality it is rapidly becoming one of the best-selling grand pianos in the world today. No, it doesn’t have a great booming bass but I’m still rather proud of its inherent musicality and the fact that it is going to bring that musicality into a great number of homes throughout the world. You, of course, will dismiss this piano out of hand believing, apparently, that it is better to have no piano at all if it can’t be at least 57” tall.

Thankfully not all piano buyers are as rigid as you; most people are willing to make compromises when they select a product such as a piano. It might help to remember that most of those spinets and consoles that we are now so contemptuous of were not purchased by musicians or pianists; they were purchased by parents. Parents who knew little or nothing about either music or pianos but who were willing to make a financial sacrifice to provide a piano for their children so the children could have that experience. And there are thousands, if not tens of thousands, of piano players today who learned how to play on just such instruments.

There seem to be those among us who believe it would have been better if those small pianos had never been built—they don’t, after all, sound as good at that great old 57” upright—but I can’t help but wonder if much thought has been given to the consequences of that scenario. Many thousands of children growing up during the 60s, 70s and 80s would not have been exposed to the piano at all. And—a little closer to home—many piano dealers and piano tuners would be in other professions. Because, trust me, very few people would have purchased anything like that 57” upright we have heard so much about and we would have witnessed the demise of the piano industry several decades back.

I guess my point is that extremism is rarely beneficial whether in politics or business or music. Personally I think it is better if a family has a Kimball La Petite that is played, tuned and serviced as opposed to one having a beautiful large grand that sits idle and dusty year after year simply taking up space. Or where there is no piano at all—just cable TV and an assortment of video games.

ddf
_________________________
Delwin D Fandrich
Piano Research, Design & Manufacturing Consultant
ddfandrich@gmail.com
(To contact me privately please use this e-mail address.)

Stupidity is a rare condition, ignorance is a common choice. --Anon

Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2

Moderator:  Piano World 
What's Hot!!
Our latest Issue is available now...
Piano News - Interesting & Fun Piano Related Newsletter! (free)
-------------------
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
121 registered (ajames, accordeur, 36251, 35 invisible), 1574 Guests and 17 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
75588 Members
42 Forums
156290 Topics
2295337 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Baldwin E250 1998
by sort
07/30/14 08:11 PM
Shostakovich and Prokofiev
by Verbum mirabilis
07/30/14 06:01 PM
Used piano buying choices
by BrianDX
07/30/14 05:55 PM
You & Your Piano
by DancerJ
07/30/14 05:12 PM
Fun etudes?
by chasingrainbows
07/30/14 04:41 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission