Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) End Stage Fright
End Stage Fright
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 199 of 274 < 1 2 ... 197 198 199 200 201 ... 273 274 >
Topic Options
#1360922 - 01/29/10 01:22 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: D4v3]
Elene Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/07
Posts: 1402
Loc: near keyboard, mouth open
Nope, no meat in Impromptu, and very little in the way of literal truth, but what a yummy confection.

D4v3, you don't have to bother godwin-ing. Hitler and the Nazis have been referenced a good many times on this thread because of their brutal suppression of Polish culture and interdiction against playing Chopin.

Backing up a little: we don’t know who the Immortal Beloved was, either.

As far as those musical mysteries go, I think we have to accept some things as unknowable. I am a little put out right now after reading more “facts” presented by certain authors. One is John O’Shea, who stated that Chopin subsisted on “bread and confectionery,” supplemented by fish and lean chicken, and that he developed a “polyphagia” for carbohydrates. He says that this is revealed by “careful study of his dietary habits.” I’m sorry, folks, but although we have some clues about what the man liked to eat and what he couldn’t stomach, none of us were following him around at every meal and keeping a log of his intake. And the idea of polyphagia (eating a great deal, excessive appetite) sounds incredibly unlikely for someone who at times had to be reminded to eat. O’Shea gives a footnote for this, but I’m unable to read what the source is in the Google Books excerpt of his work.

(My intuitive information is that he was crazy about potatoes, particularly with barszcz czerwony. But I would not presume to know what proportion of his diet consisted of potatoes or how many of them he actually consumed. Which would be pretty irrelevant anyway.)

O’Shea also mentioned the incident where the 18-year-old Fryderyk played a bit at an inn and the audience picked him up and carried him on their shoulders. He takes this as meaning that the young man was so utterly exhausted by the performance that he couldn’t walk. Good grief. The people who heard him did that because they were so excited by what they had heard. They gave him cookies, too. (Oh, no, carbohydrates!) At least that’s the story that we’ve received, and since we have no other evidence that he was utterly prostrated by playing during his teens, I’m going with that.

In general, I'd appreciate it if authors would present not-quite-facts with "it appears that" or "as far as is known" or some such weasel words.

The line drawing posted above is anatomically impossible, and little or no information can be derived from it regarding Chopin’s technique. It does make me wonder, again, about the effects of the incredibly restrictive clothing worn in those days, both the choking collars and the corsets, on one’s playing.

The painting with the spirit forms swirling about the piano-- perhaps the less said the better, but at any rate the solid female form with ribbons in her hair is obviously meant to be Mme Sand.

Elene
_________________________
Semi-Pro Musica

Blog: http://elenedom.wordpress.com
Website: http://elenelistens.com






Top
(ads P/S)
Petrof Pianos

piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#1361003 - 01/29/10 03:09 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
John Citron Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/15/05
Posts: 3925
Loc: Haverhill, Massachusetts
The picture of Chopin at the piano is interesting. I know that it's only a drawing, and probably is meant as only that. However it's interesting to note that people sat at the piano a little differntly than we do today. I was told this by the people at the Frederick Collection. Today we sit more forward, but in those days, the sat more erect and further back from the piano. I think too that this may have had something to do with the clothing that they wore back then with ridgid belts, corsets, and collars.

The idea of Chopin being carried overhead, Elaine, to me is not for someone who was exhausted, but more in celebration for his performance. This is the way that we treat ball players today at the end of a great game or competition. Some authors go out of the way to show how weak he was, when he probably wasn't for a good part of his life.

John
_________________________
Nothing.

Top
#1361034 - 01/29/10 03:45 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: John Citron]
D4v3 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/07/09
Posts: 501
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
My favorite event in Chopin's life is when he went and visited Scotland. If I recall correctly he thought the women were bores and had such disdain for people that looked at their hands when they played, which is why maybe in the drawn image he is looking straight ahead.
_________________________
Currently learning composition:

Some of my compositions

Top
#1361065 - 01/29/10 04:34 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Jeff Kallberg]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: loveschopintoomuch
This is way off topic, I know. Last night I was reading a mystery story (my favorite genre). The main character referred to an antique piano (coffin shaped and from around 1850)
That would be a Broadwood square. Chopin played on some squares he liked - probably Pleyel or Erard.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1361073 - 01/29/10 04:45 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: Elene
And the idea of polyphagia (eating a great deal, excessive appetite) sounds incredibly unlikely for someone who at times had to be reminded to eat. O’Shea gives a footnote for this, but I’m unable to read what the source is in the Google Books excerpt of his work.
page 40 of G.R. Marek's Chopin. Does anybody have it?
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1361076 - 01/29/10 04:47 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: D4v3]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: D4v3
My favorite event in Chopin's life is when he went and visited Scotland.
Not much of a favourite for him. He was dying most of the time and nearly killed in a coach crash!
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1361110 - 01/29/10 05:26 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: keyboardklutz]
Jeff Kallberg Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/11/09
Posts: 208
Originally Posted By: keyboardklutz
Originally Posted By: Elene
And the idea of polyphagia (eating a great deal, excessive appetite) sounds incredibly unlikely for someone who at times had to be reminded to eat. O’Shea gives a footnote for this, but I’m unable to read what the source is in the Google Books excerpt of his work.
page 40 of G.R. Marek's Chopin. Does anybody have it?


(Raising my hand): nothing relating to polyphagia on p. 40 of my edition of Marek (London, 1979).

Jeff Kallberg

Top
#1361121 - 01/29/10 05:41 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Jeff Kallberg]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6645
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
-Elene...in reference to "Backing up a little: we don’t know who the Immortal Beloved was, either."... it's generally accepted among Beethoven scholars that Antonie Brentano, was the Immortal Beloved. Maynard Solomon, in his "Beethoven", makes an extraordinarily strong case for her, and it's largely through his work that most have come to acknowledge her. Of course, there's no absolute (key word here) concrete, physical evidence identifying her, as such, and we may never truly know her identity, but I'm more than convinced by, and agree with, Solomon. If you've not read the biography, it's well worth the time.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1361134 - 01/29/10 06:03 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: stores]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6645
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Elene-what, exactly, do you mean by, "(My intuitive information is that he was crazy about potatoes, particularly with barszcz czerwony...)"?

I'm with you in regard to authors, who state, as fact, events that cannot be verified any more than can one of them verify the existence of Adam and Eve. Unfortunately, (and I've stated this before) that's how we end up with all of these overly romanticized notions about the lives of many composers, and the events that surrounded and affected them. That's a huge reason, I think, that, much of what is presented as "fact" needs to be run through the sifter. Quite often, when anecdotes are set against a historical, factual background, the story takes a different shape entirely.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1361169 - 01/29/10 07:05 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: stores]
John Citron Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/15/05
Posts: 3925
Loc: Haverhill, Massachusetts
Originally Posted By: stores
Elene-what, exactly, do you mean by, "(My intuitive information is that he was crazy about potatoes, particularly with barszcz czerwony...)"?

I'm with you in regard to authors, who state, as fact, events that cannot be verified any more than can one of them verify the existence of Adam and Eve. Unfortunately, (and I've stated this before) that's how we end up with all of these overly romanticized notions about the lives of many composers, and the events that surrounded and affected them. That's a huge reason, I think, that, much of what is presented as "fact" needs to be run through the sifter. Quite often, when anecdotes are set against a historical, factual background, the story takes a different shape entirely.


I agree! I've said this in so many words here myself. This the bad part of history and famous people. In some ways we have now way of knowing what is real and what is a biographerer's overly dramatic writing mostly to give himself a nice position in the historical context.

Unfortunately the real facts sometimes put our beloved romaticized composers into a less than better light once we read about how they more likely lived.

John
_________________________
Nothing.

Top
#1361331 - 01/29/10 11:24 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: -Frycek]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6645
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: -Frycek
Actually the 1837 date is probably wrong for the C Minor Posthumous Noctune. If the write up in the Paderewski edition Minor Works is correct the date 1837 (the rational for which is never given and is not printed in the Paderweski) the date should've been around 1827 when Chopin was 17 and studying composition under Professor Elsner. I actually think it was a piece he left in Poland and forgot about. How it survived until 1937 when it was first published and reached the Paris Conservatory Library which provided the manuscript, is anybody's guess. It may have been a piece he'd left in the album of one of his teenaged friends that made it's way to library through a bequest or an auction. Most of the papers Chopin left with his family including the manuscripts for half a dozen waltzes were destroyed in 1866 when the Russians trashed and burned the belongings of the tenants of the building in which Chopin's mother and surviving sister were still living as a reprisal for an attempted assasinatiion of the Russian governor by one of the tenants. Of course the nocturne may've been one of the papers sister Isabella did manage to save.

I have a copy that may be scanned if it can wait till I get off work this evening.


I've just been browsing through the forum here and reading some older posts and ran across this one. I'm wondering if anyone can tell me why the Paderewski edition is wrong in asserting 1837 as the date of composition for the posthumous c minor nocturne. I realize that, stylistically, it seems to, perhaps, belong to an earlier period. There is some thought that it's not the work of Chopin at all, though the manuscript is in his handwriting. The theory, is that, it's perhaps, his rendering of a piece written by Maria Wodzinska (who did study with Field). Apparently she sent Chopin one of her compositions, but that's all that's known. At any rate, I'm curious as to the basis for the proposed 1827 composition date as opposed to the date given by Paderewski, and why his date is in error.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1361334 - 01/29/10 11:41 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: John Citron]
Elene Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/07
Posts: 1402
Loc: near keyboard, mouth open
I read Solomon’s book on Beethoven some years ago and thought the question of the Immortal Beloved was fairly well settled too, but when it came up a few days ago here, I did a search, being unable to remember the lady’s name. I found that the controversy is still alive and well. The Wikipedia entry “Immortal Beloved” gives: “The currently fading academic favour for Antonie Brentano as the putative recipient may be attributed to the arguments adduced in an influential book by the Beethoven scholar Maynard Solomon.” The article goes on to give reasons gleaned from more recent scholarship that make Antonie seem a less likely candidate. Apparently her identity as Beethoven’s beloved is no longer so generally agreed upon. I have no clue and no opinion about this myself-- I’m only reporting what I read.

Regarding the potatoes and barszcz: I’m a fairly skilled clairvoyant and medical intuitive, and what I think of as a "small medium"-- not as good a medium as I'd like, but decently able. Chopin makes himself quite accessible to quite a few people, and it’s possible to get a lot of information from and about him through intuitive means. (Though, as I’ve pointed out, that still doesn’t mean that we can get pure, unbiased, absolutely reliable information, or that we can find out anything and everything we might wish.) There’s kind of an amusing story attached to the potato thing, which came up last November, and I guess I should package it up and put it on my blog so you can see it if you want. I’ve just recently starting posting Chopin-related material there.

Elene (not Elaine or Elena, by the way)
_________________________
Semi-Pro Musica

Blog: http://elenedom.wordpress.com
Website: http://elenelistens.com






Top
#1361348 - 01/30/10 12:18 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
LisztAddict Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/12/05
Posts: 2895
Loc: Florida
Thirty years ago, I watched a fictional movie about some mermaids. In the movie, the main background music was Chopin Nocturne Op 9 No 1. It was the most beautiful music I ever heard. I went home and dug up the sheet music of it. I practiced it like crazy then went back to the theater a few days later to see the movie/listen to the music again. I watched this movie 3 times total but can't remember much of the movie now.

http://www.box.net/shared/icf5f425t1

Hope you enjoy it.

Top
#1361354 - 01/30/10 12:29 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Jeff Kallberg]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: Jeff Kallberg
(Raising my hand): nothing relating to polyphagia on p. 40 of my edition of Marek (London, 1979).
Jeff Kallberg
His is (New York, 1978). You sure there's nothing on another page?
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#1361376 - 01/30/10 01:18 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6645
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Elene
I read Solomon’s book on Beethoven some years ago and thought the question of the Immortal Beloved was fairly well settled too, but when it came up a few days ago here, I did a search, being unable to remember the lady’s name. I found that the controversy is still alive and well. The Wikipedia entry “Immortal Beloved” gives: “The currently fading academic favour for Antonie Brentano as the putative recipient may be attributed to the arguments adduced in an influential book by the Beethoven scholar Maynard Solomon.” The article goes on to give reasons gleaned from more recent scholarship that make Antonie seem a less likely candidate. Apparently her identity as Beethoven’s beloved is no longer so generally agreed upon. I have no clue and no opinion about this myself-- I’m only reporting what I read.

Regarding the potatoes and barszcz: I’m a fairly skilled clairvoyant and medical intuitive, and what I think of as a "small medium"-- not as good a medium as I'd like, but decently able. Chopin makes himself quite accessible to quite a few people, and it’s possible to get a lot of information from and about him through intuitive means. (Though, as I’ve pointed out, that still doesn’t mean that we can get pure, unbiased, absolutely reliable information, or that we can find out anything and everything we might wish.) There’s kind of an amusing story attached to the potato thing, which came up last November, and I guess I should package it up and put it on my blog so you can see it if you want. I’ve just recently starting posting Chopin-related material there.

Elene (not Elaine or Elena, by the way)


Yes, I'm quite familiar with some of the more recent findings. I belong to the American Beethoven Society and regularly receive the "Beethoven Journal", in which, less than a decade ago, it was theorized that Bettina Brentano, might be the Immortal Beloved. Many of the more recent questions that have arisen have been the result of published letters from the Brentano family (by Martin Kopitz...the same Kopitz, whose present theory is that Elisabeth Roeckel is Beethoven's Elise...which has been discussed elsewhere). Many recent theories make inferences that Solomon, didn't take certain details into account in his reasoning, but Solomon, specifically addresses some of the very points being questioned in his biography. That said, Wikipedia, is, by no means, the definitive authority on any subject and can be amended by anyone. As a result, the information presented therein, is, at times, slanted, which, is fairly obvious from the articles line (which I read) that begins "The currently fading academic favour for Antonie Brentano..." It may be fading for a few, but the supportive evidence is, still, quite highly regarded by most. I'm not knocking Wikipedia (or your findings), but really, it's authorship and content, at times, is questionable and some of it's language (as above) should be amended so as not to appear quite so absolute.
All that said, there really is no way (as yet) to determine, definitively, who the "Beloved" is. Personally, I'm not convinced that Solomon's findings are faulty, but, then again, he could be completely wrong. I doubt we'll ever know.

As to the intuitive thing...that's interesting...to say the least. I'd like to read the potato story, if you ever post it.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1361426 - 01/30/10 03:36 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: stores]
Elene Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/07
Posts: 1402
Loc: near keyboard, mouth open
I would be relieved to think that Antonie's identity as the Beloved was clear and that we actually knew for sure, or reasonably for sure, about this. It would be nice to know something for sure. Is there a place where one can read Solomon's refutation of those criticisms of the Antonie theory?

And I'd like to think that Ludwig had a beautiful and satisfying romance with someone-- but is even that much clear?

I'm afraid that I've forgotten much of what little I did know about Beethoven. I do remember that, as with the Chopin bios, there was a lack of agreement between books on some points, almost as if you were reading about two different people. No, I don't remember many details.

Wikipedia is certainly often questionable, and in fact I would like to bring up a couple of questionable bits it has to say about Chopin in its current incarnation, but I haven't gotten to that yet.

LA, thanks for posting the lovely nocturne. There's been so much discussion around here of how much rubato is enough or too much-- I think this performance gets that just right.

Elene
_________________________
Semi-Pro Musica

Blog: http://elenedom.wordpress.com
Website: http://elenelistens.com






Top
#1361636 - 01/30/10 01:43 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: stores]
Jeff Kallberg Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/11/09
Posts: 208
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: -Frycek
Actually the 1837 date is probably wrong for the C Minor Posthumous Noctune. If the write up in the Paderewski edition Minor Works is correct the date 1837 (the rational for which is never given and is not printed in the Paderweski) the date should've been around 1827 when Chopin was 17 and studying composition under Professor Elsner. I actually think it was a piece he left in Poland and forgot about. How it survived until 1937 when it was first published and reached the Paris Conservatory Library which provided the manuscript, is anybody's guess. It may have been a piece he'd left in the album of one of his teenaged friends that made it's way to library through a bequest or an auction. Most of the papers Chopin left with his family including the manuscripts for half a dozen waltzes were destroyed in 1866 when the Russians trashed and burned the belongings of the tenants of the building in which Chopin's mother and surviving sister were still living as a reprisal for an attempted assasinatiion of the Russian governor by one of the tenants. Of course the nocturne may've been one of the papers sister Isabella did manage to save.

I have a copy that may be scanned if it can wait till I get off work this evening.


I've just been browsing through the forum here and reading some older posts and ran across this one. I'm wondering if anyone can tell me why the Paderewski edition is wrong in asserting 1837 as the date of composition for the posthumous c minor nocturne. I realize that, stylistically, it seems to, perhaps, belong to an earlier period. There is some thought that it's not the work of Chopin at all, though the manuscript is in his handwriting. The theory, is that, it's perhaps, his rendering of a piece written by Maria Wodzinska (who did study with Field). Apparently she sent Chopin one of her compositions, but that's all that's known. At any rate, I'm curious as to the basis for the proposed 1827 composition date as opposed to the date given by Paderewski, and why his date is in error.


The date most Chopin scholars accept is actually around 1847. This is based on evidence derived from the kind of paper Chopin used in the three extant manuscripts (one sketch, one rough autograph, one clean autograph): without getting too much into the details, the paper cannot derive from either 1827 or 1837. On the other hand, it is entirely consistent with paper he was using toward the end of his composing career.

Jeff Kallberg

Top
#1361640 - 01/30/10 01:49 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Jeff Kallberg]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19285
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: Jeff Kallberg
.....evidence derived from the kind of paper Chopin used in the three extant manuscripts....cannot derive from either 1827 or 1837. On the other hand, it is entirely consistent with paper he was using toward the end of his composing career.

Wow!
How's that, folks?

Sometimes internal analysis involves more than just the music!

From the music itself, I would have almost sworn the piece was earlier.
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1361642 - 01/30/10 01:55 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Mark_C]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6645
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Thank you, Mr. Kallberg. That's incredible information and something I was not, at all, aware of. It really puts things into a different perspective, completely.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1361647 - 01/30/10 01:59 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: stores]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19285
Loc: New York
Funny.....he said to call him "Jeff" but I don't think anyone has (except me, once or twice) and most people seem to be saying "Dr. Kallberg." I guess Mr. Kallberg is a good compromise. smile
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1361696 - 01/30/10 03:27 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Mark_C]
Elene Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/07
Posts: 1402
Loc: near keyboard, mouth open
I am swooning at the thought of having access to old manuscripts and being able to examine the actual paper. Nerd dreams....

I think we were trying to differentiate Dr. Jeff from Jeff Clef. My respects to both, and hopes that both feel welcome here and will for a very long time.

OT, here is an article about a highly unusual Polish man, Dr. Alexander Imich, who is about to turn 107 in a few days and is still actively involved in research! Do you suppose it's the bread with lard and onions?? http://metgat.gaia.com/blog (Not my blog, but my friend Michael Tymn's.)

Elene
_________________________
Semi-Pro Musica

Blog: http://elenedom.wordpress.com
Website: http://elenelistens.com






Top
#1361745 - 01/30/10 04:57 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4393
Loc: San Jose, CA
"Do you suppose it's the bread with lard and onions?"

That's a lot of supposing. However, Julia Child remarked that she ate anything she wanted--- just, not too much of it. She also observed, "It is difficult to imagine a civilization without the onion."

I don't recall her mentioning lard--- not by name. Maybe they call it something else in France.

I just finished Dr. Kallberg's book, Chopin at the Boundaries, after taking a break midway. I especially loved the chapter on his publishing history, with the details of the lost documents discovered in back of a filing cabinet, or tumbling out from between the leaves of a ledger.

Examining the paper on which a document was inscribed was one of the first things Sherlock Holmes did--- and he found out plenty.

Unfortunately, the book was over just as I was getting my second wind... so I read the endnotes. And now, to resume Newman's book (also having benefited from lighter fare for a time--- if you can call a biography of Tchaikovsky lighter ), The Pianist's Problems.
_________________________
Clef


Top
#1361793 - 01/30/10 06:19 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Mark_C]
Jeff Kallberg Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/11/09
Posts: 208
Originally Posted By: Mark_C
Funny.....he said to call him "Jeff" but I dont think anyone has (except me, once or twice) and most people seem to be saying "Dr. Kallberg." I guess Mr. Kallberg is a good compromise. smile


As the old joke goes: call me anything, just don't call me late for dinner.

Speaking of which, time to go cook. Lacking black bread and smalec, I shall settle for salmon and lentils.

Jeff Kallberg

Top
#1361799 - 01/30/10 06:27 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Jeff Kallberg]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19285
Loc: New York
Admirably healthy just the same. smile
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1361885 - 01/30/10 10:02 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6645
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Elene
I am swooning at the thought of having access to old manuscripts and being able to examine the actual paper. Nerd dreams....

I think we were trying to differentiate Dr. Jeff from Jeff Clef. My respects to both, and hopes that both feel welcome here and will for a very long time.

OT, here is an article about a highly unusual Polish man, Dr. Alexander Imich, who is about to turn 107 in a few days and is still actively involved in research! Do you suppose it's the bread with lard and onions?? http://metgat.gaia.com/blog (Not my blog, but my friend Michael Tymn's.)

Elene


Elene, it's not a nerd dream (if it is, then I'm the King of the Nerds haha!) and you actually CAN do just that. The Ira Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies at SJSU (homebase for the American Beethoven Society), houses the largest collection of Beethoven materials in the Western Hemisphere (personal effects, lock of hair, autograph manuscripts, sketches, letters, copyist scores, first editions, etc., etc.) Some of the Center's first editions are on display for anyone to view and there's an incredible collection of autograph facsimiles. You can also arrange to view autograph manuscripts in their collection via, Patricia Stroh, the Center's curator, who, will access said score from their vault for you. There is an online database... Beethoven Gateway...containing the Center's collection. It's there that you can see which manuscripts (or whatever you're interested in seeing) the Center houses. If you ever have the opportunity to visit you should. Spending time with an original document is an experience that is almost impossible to put into words...it's almost like a religious experience. At least, for me, it was. I've caught myself with a tear in my eye on more than one occassion
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1363225 - 02/01/10 12:38 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: stores]
Elene Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/07
Posts: 1402
Loc: near keyboard, mouth open
The website for the Beethoven center is most impressive. It does look like a fascinating place.

The closest I've been to a collection like that is the Biblioteka Polska in Paris, where there are manuscripts, mementos, the death mask, Chopin's 1845 piano, and a chair he owned. I'll never forget my reaction to seeing his hair. Even though I'm so accustomed to him and he's such an everyday part of my life, somehow seeing evidence of his physical existence was rather a shock. I thought, "Oh, my God, he's REAL!"

And I almost fainted when I was allowed to briefly touch the keys of the piano. It occurred to me that there might be a few dessicated cells from his skin, molecules of oil, that sort of thing-- that in a sense I might be actually touching him.

(I think of "nerd" as a compliment.)

Elene
_________________________
Semi-Pro Musica

Blog: http://elenedom.wordpress.com
Website: http://elenelistens.com






Top
#1363339 - 02/01/10 03:03 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Elene]
Teodor Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/16/09
Posts: 939
Loc: Bulgaria
I just found this. It's a video where you can see Chopin's piano and hear how it sounds.
_________________________
Currently 2nd Year: Music & Piano Teaching Major


Recitals:

Top
#1363385 - 02/01/10 03:47 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: LisztAddict]
Strings & Wood Offline


Gold member until Dec. 2012


Registered: 05/22/08
Posts: 1833
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: LisztAddict
Thirty years ago, I watched a fictional movie about some mermaids. In the movie, the main background music was Chopin Nocturne Op 9 No 1. It was the most beautiful music I ever heard. I went home and dug up the sheet music of it. I practiced it like crazy then went back to the theater a few days later to see the movie/listen to the music again. I watched this movie 3 times total but can't remember much of the movie now.

http://www.box.net/shared/icf5f425t1

Hope you enjoy it.


I did, thank you.
_________________________



Schimmel K213 NWS




Top
#1365301 - 02/04/10 12:39 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Strings & Wood]
Elene Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/07
Posts: 1402
Loc: near keyboard, mouth open
Boze moj! I completely forgot Mozart's birthday! He turned 254 last week.

It had also gotten past me that Robert Schumann's bicentennial will be coming up this June. Somehow it always seems to me that he was born a year or two later than he actually was.

The NY Times did an article recently comparing and contrasting Chopin and Schumann, which is probably available online (I was given a hard copy of it). Among other things it contains a picture of a Chopin manuscript that includes both random musical bits and doodled drawings. And a portrait of Schumann when he was young and cuter than you might think.

Elene
_________________________
Semi-Pro Musica

Blog: http://elenedom.wordpress.com
Website: http://elenelistens.com






Top
#1365312 - 02/04/10 01:00 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin [Re: Teodor]
ChopinAddict Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/29/09
Posts: 6075
Loc: Land of the never-ending music
Originally Posted By: Teodor
I just found this. It's a video where you can see Chopin's piano and hear how it sounds.


Thanks! thumb
_________________________



Music is my best friend.


Top
Page 199 of 274 < 1 2 ... 197 198 199 200 201 ... 273 274 >

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
96 registered (AZ_Astro, Atrys, a_dee, ADWyatt, 24 invisible), 1290 Guests and 43 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74198 Members
42 Forums
153491 Topics
2249184 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Bechstein 7
by PhilipInChina
15 minutes 41 seconds ago
Premier Piano of New York
by FenderJazzMan
Yesterday at 11:58 PM
Top selling self-taught pianists?
by Sand Tiger
Yesterday at 11:06 PM
Just got my MP11!
by Dan Clark
Yesterday at 10:18 PM
Cracks in my soundboard??
by Markarian
Yesterday at 09:35 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission