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#1384092 - 02/27/10 03:38 PM Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument
drm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 37
Loc: CT
Hi there

I seldom post on PW, not being a piano player, but found this site incredibly helpful when I was purchasing a piano a few years back. My son (4th grade) has been playing the piano for the past 3.5 years. While not a prodigy, piano seems to come easily to him and his teacher comments on his ability. He is just starting an intermediate book at this point and his playing has really started to take shape over the past year. I think he better enjoys the music selection and added difficulty. I view him more as a technical player, though, wanting everything to be correct, versus the passionate or emotional player. Hopefully, the later part comes in time. I should also comment that he doesn't live and die by the piano, but he is good about practicing and I think he truly enjoys playing.

Next year he will have the ability to start playing a band instrument in school. I like the idea, thinking the band will be a social outlet for the years ahead. He is not a sport oriented kid (other than karate), but more math and science. His school music teacher is all for it and his piano teacher is fine with it. His piano teacher thinks playing a second instrument is fine (she plays multiple instruments), albeit wants (& thinks) piano will be his main instrument.

My son's first reaction is that he is a piano player. His second response was "how about guitar", not quite a band instrument. We still have plenty of time to think about this, but I was hoping for some thoughts from the members here. Can the piano and a band instrument work together? Is it reasonable to think the piano will remain the primary instrument? Is there a band instrument that you would recommend & why? My ultimate aim is to enhance my son's school years, while also fostering his ability to play music, a lifelong skill. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thank you


Edited by drm (02/27/10 05:48 PM)

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#1384126 - 02/27/10 04:47 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: drm]
Lollipop Offline
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Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 820
Loc: Georgia
The school district I live in does a really good job of supporting music, and the teachers are excellent. The teachers here allow the students to try out different instruments, and then the teachers make recommendations based on what they see. It's hard to explain, but different physical attributes might make one instrument preferable over another - size and shape of mouth, for example.

I have three children - all adults now - who all grew up playing the piano and another instrument. The eldest went with guitar. He taught himself acoustic, and took lessons for classical. He sounds much like your son - academic, and technically proficient on piano. Guitar has definitely won his heart - he plays regularly, and saves his money for more "toys" (He has several guitars, acoustic and electric, and a whole bunch of gadgets.) This son initially thought he wanted to play violin in middle school, but the teacher was very demanding, and we decided it would be an exercise in frustration. (One of these teachers who demanded that the parents sign practice sheets - 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year - or grade suffers. We weren't willing to lie, and weren't willing to let it affect his grades.) He started guitar in 9th grade.

Second son did band. Band director recommended the instrument based on what he saw as son's natural talent. (That son is at Juilliard now.) We did have a challenge finding appropriate piano teachers for him. He was quite talented - the emotional player - but it was his second - or third - priority, and several piano teachers we met with weren't willing to be anything but first on the list.

Daughter did orchestra. But she started violin at age 6.

Band and orchestra were wonderful outlets for two of my kids. It was a set group of friends, especially when moving from middle to high school. And music just tends to attract the nicest people!

Piano is a great instrument and a great skill all by itself. But it is a wonderful foundation to build on with other instruments as well. Why don't you consider taking your son to some concerts in the area - classical orchestra concerts, high school band concerts, free recitals, or whatever you can find. Some of the choice of instrument might be dictated by what music he likes best.
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#1384164 - 02/27/10 05:50 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: drm]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Notice: Highly opinionated post follows. Don't read it if you don't like strong opinions.

Does your son's school offer a strings program? Choir? Does your community support an youth orchestra program?

I generally recommend my students explore strings or participate in choir if it's available. This is not to put down band programs, but the function of bands is more to serve as schools' athletic cheer leading than genuine musical development. Obviously, there are exceptions, or I'm sure there are band directors who are earnestly trying to be the exception.

Anyway, my point being that choir is one way a student can learn voicing and phrasing; strings are generally melodic instruments in symphonic music, so again, students are learning voicing and phrasing.

If band is the only option, I would steer him away from clarinets and trumpets and see if he can learn oboe, French horn, English horn, bassoon, etc.
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1384167 - 02/27/10 05:53 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: Lollipop]
RayE Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/19/10
Posts: 163
Loc: Rochester, NY, USA
I've played the piano and a band instrument for many years, and I've played both instruments in a semi-professional setting (I'm retired from an Army Reserve Band). If you want to know what band instrument would most compliment his piano playing I would go with percussion. It will enhance his sense of timing, and he also is familiar with the keyboard so he would be a natural at keyboard percussion, Xylaphone, marimba, orchestra bells, etc.
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#1384170 - 02/27/10 05:56 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: Lollipop]
dumdumdiddle Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 1263
Loc: California
In my town the schools don't give kids the opportunity to learn an instrument until 5th grade (too late, in my opinion).

I have several students who started piano with me at age 5 or 6 and then started a band or orchestra instrument around age 10 or so. What I hear from the parents or the child's band teacher is that the kids usual 'take off' with their 2nd instrument and do really well. In fact, many students skip the first year of beginning band or get bumped up to a a higher band level because of their piano background. They already know how to read music and rhythm; they just need to learn how to play their instrument.

Sometimes students will end up preferring another instrument over piano; sometimes kids will do both instruments. My own kids started out with piano and then learned a 2nd instrument. My son played saxophone and drums, preferring drums as his 'main' instrument. My daughter did a little violin and then guitar (electric and acoustic), which she now plays exclusively. They did have some lessons in their other instruments but have mainly learned on their own. Both are in college and still play; my son was part of a local band and also plays in the worship band at church on occasion.

I would definitely encourage a 2nd instrument and being in the school band will be a great experience for him and he'll have many wonderful memories.

**Edited to ditto what RayE mentioned above. I have a few piano students who absolutely excel at percussion in their school bands. The xylophone and marimba seem to be very natural for piano players.


Edited by dumdumdiddle (02/27/10 05:59 PM)
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#1384178 - 02/27/10 06:08 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: dumdumdiddle]
Piano*Dad Offline
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Registered: 04/12/05
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Loc: Williamsburg, VA
My eldest has combined horn and piano very effectively so far. Piano started first, and remains primary, but he studies horn seriously with a top teacher. One can do both at these ages. There are costs, of course. The time spent practicing the horn or playing with the band cannot be used for piano or other things. There are synergies as well. Playing the piano made learning the horn quite a bit easier. And playing the horn has given him a window on breathing that now influences his phrasing and control on the piano. The horn has also allowed him to experience orchestral music from the musician's point of view.
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#1384218 - 02/27/10 07:07 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: Piano*Dad]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
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Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
More highly opiniontion here - regretfully, my worst student, who was intellectually brilliant and very capable, was a percussionist. Trying to teach this student not to play percussively was a constant, and regretfully, losing battle.
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"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
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#1384244 - 02/27/10 07:33 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Barb860 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/09
Posts: 1644
Loc: northern California
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Notice: Highly opinionated post follows. Don't read it if you don't like strong opinions.

Does your son's school offer a strings program? Choir? Does your community support an youth orchestra program?

I generally recommend my students explore strings or participate in choir if it's available. This is not to put down band programs, but the function of bands is more to serve as schools' athletic cheer leading than genuine musical development. Obviously, there are exceptions, or I'm sure there are band directors who are earnestly trying to be the exception.

Anyway, my point being that choir is one way a student can learn voicing and phrasing; strings are generally melodic instruments in symphonic music, so again, students are learning voicing and phrasing.

If band is the only option, I would steer him away from clarinets and trumpets and see if he can learn oboe, French horn, English horn, bassoon, etc.


+1

Alas, and a bit OT here, excuse me, but as I read this thread my heart aches for the music program in our K-8 school district.
Last year one music teacher was cut, and this year the board is proposing to cut general music, band, and choir from grades 4-6, leaving us with only band 7-8. Especially tough times here in CA.
You all are fortunate if you have well-supported music programs in your schools. I hope you can keep them and put your kids into these programs.
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#1384250 - 02/27/10 07:42 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: Lollipop]
drm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 37
Loc: CT
Lollipop

Thank you for the insightful response. It's comforting to see how you can create different avenues for the different aptitudes and personalities. While I know my son enjoys music, he seems so technical about playing, that it seems more about mastering something he finds fascinating versus the passion of the music. I guess time will tell.

I also like your suggestion about taking him to different musical concerts. He really enjoys going to see more contemporary events as well as musical shows. His one symphony outing was not easy, but it was his first time. I know I should expose him to more of it. Once again thank you. I appreciate the perspective and suggestions.

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#1384255 - 02/27/10 07:47 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: drm]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3156
Loc: Virginia, USA
I still play in band, and I'm 57.

Band gives exposure to musical skills you don't often see in the privacy of a piano practice room: ensemble skills, learning to play in good time and tune with others, to blend, to listen, to subordinate your ego to the needs of the group.

Also, it's a social activity at an age where kids are intensely social beings.

When I was in high school, all the good piano students I knew played in band and/or sang in the choir.

You can do both, and it's usually worthwhile.
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#1384260 - 02/27/10 07:52 PM Choir and Band start in 5th grade [Re: John v.d.Brook]
drm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 37
Loc: CT
He has a good singing voice and I think joining the choir is fine. I would still like the band option, though. I think it provides a better social outlet as he goes into middle and high school.

Unfortunately, our town does not have a strong string program. They have an intro program for second graders, but it doesn't tie back into any of the school programs and it's not tied to any orchestral program. At the high school level, they have also offer orchestra and jazz programs. Thank you for the thoughts on instruments.

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#1384269 - 02/27/10 08:03 PM Out towns seem similar [Re: dumdumdiddle]
drm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 37
Loc: CT
They don't offer an orchestra program, but start band and choir in the 5th grade. His piano teacher indicated a similar thought about it be easier to learn a second or third instrument. Hopefully, that will be his experience.

I would prefer piano be the dominant instrument, but I know it's not in my control. I do, however, hope that whatever musical outlet he chooses can help in during his school years as well as be a life long pursuit. Thank you.

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#1384271 - 02/27/10 08:05 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: TimR]
daviel Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/07
Posts: 933
Loc: Waxahachie, Texas
tenor sax or trumpet! just kidding. I'd encourage your son to learn another instrument. He can get used to a band/ensemble culture.
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#1384276 - 02/27/10 08:10 PM I still play in the band [Re: TimR]
drm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 37
Loc: CT
Tim R and Ray E

Thank you for your responses. From your experiences, it seems more than doable to pursue two instruments. I think the school band, or variation of, will be good for him socially, especially given his more academic focus. Hopefully, he also finds the right fit instrument wise.

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#1384283 - 02/27/10 08:19 PM Thank you for the comments [Re: Piano*Dad]
drm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 37
Loc: CT
I remember following some of your posts when we were looking for a piano. The more I read the comments here, it seems fairly routine for kids to try a second instrument, or at least for the more accomplished which is represented by the audience here. I guess I wish that for my son. Once again, thank you for sharing your thoughts.

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#1384332 - 02/27/10 09:23 PM Re: Thank you for the comments [Re: drm]
Stanny Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/06
Posts: 1461
I think a 2nd instrument adds to the music experience. I started band myself after 4 years of piano, and it only increased my abilities in piano. That's the year I "took off" in terms of practicing and performance.
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Independent Music Teacher
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#1384339 - 02/27/10 09:39 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: TimR]
Googlism Offline
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Registered: 08/08/02
Posts: 1072
Loc: Toronto
I played band in my first year in high school, originally as a trombonist. However due to asthma I felt I needed to switch to another instrument, and I thought the xylophone was a good fit. The keys are laid out just like a keyboard, so it's a lot easier to read music than the other instruments.

At my school I couldn't just play the xylophone - I had to play other percussive instruments such as bells, snare drum, e.t.c. This may be the same case for other schools, as there aren't many band pieces which rely on xylophone.
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#1384352 - 02/27/10 10:04 PM Re: Choir and Band start in 5th grade [Re: drm]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: drm
He has a good singing voice and I think joining the choir is fine. I would still like the band option, though. I think it provides a better social outlet as he goes into middle and high school.

Unfortunately, our town does not have a strong string program. They have an intro program for second graders, but it doesn't tie back into any of the school programs and it's not tied to any orchestral program. At the high school level, they have also offer orchestra and jazz programs. Thank you for the thoughts on instruments.


As you are relatively new here, let me tell you about my school background. I began piano in 2nd grade; choir in 4th and violin in 5th. I continued choir through 8th grade. I joined band in 7th grade and quickly became proficient on the French horn. Also took a stab, unsuccessful, at oboe. I continued violin studies through HS, and have continued to played in amateur orchestras as an adult.

A second instrument really broadens a student and I encourage it. Each musical activity broadens and enlightens the student. If the student really falls in love with piano, there will be nothing you can do, short of selling the piano, to get him to stop playing it!
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1385209 - 02/28/10 11:24 PM Re: Choir and Band start in 5th grade [Re: John v.d.Brook]
007Pianolady Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/21/07
Posts: 41
I encourage all my piano students to consider playing in their schools' music groups. We have a lot of excellent music programs in our local schools. I played tenor saxophone, hand bells, & sang in choirs, but chose piano as my main instrument. I'm not one to tell my students piano has to be their only instrument, and I'm going to answer this more as a parent than a teacher.

Our son was quite adamant that he take up trumpet in 5th grade, he'd already had 5 years of piano. His uncle had donated his Bach strad to him, what a way to start! He became an excellent All-State trumpeter. He'd picked up bass guitar by high school and now plays in the college marching band and pep bands. This is his "outside activity" when he isn't studying for his engineering degree. Music is an important part of his life, and it started with piano.

Our daughter plays trombone and is an All-State soprano. She too had 5 years of piano before joining band, and later choirs. She also plays hand bells. She once considered being a music major, but chose another career, however music plays a central part in her life also.

Piano became the secondary instrument for both our children, but an important part in bringing the love of music into their lives.
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#1385320 - 03/01/10 06:38 AM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: John v.d.Brook]
John_B Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/17/10
Posts: 621
Loc: Bristol, UK
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Notice: Highly opinionated post follows. Don't read it if you don't like strong opinions.

Does your son's school offer a strings program? Choir? Does your community support an youth orchestra program?

I generally recommend my students explore strings or participate in choir if it's available. This is not to put down band programs, but the function of bands is more to serve as schools' athletic cheer leading than genuine musical development. Obviously, there are exceptions, or I'm sure there are band directors who are earnestly trying to be the exception.

Anyway, my point being that choir is one way a student can learn voicing and phrasing; strings are generally melodic instruments in symphonic music, so again, students are learning voicing and phrasing.

If band is the only option, I would steer him away from clarinets and trumpets and see if he can learn oboe, French horn, English horn, bassoon, etc.


I think this is *extremely* sensible advice.

One very important thing that, IMO, cannot be over emphasised is that playing a string instrument, or any of those that John suggested, opens up wonderful opportunities for playing chamber music and making music with other people. I really cannot overstate the joy this can be - the next best thing after sex.

Also, I think I am right in saying that players of the woodwind instruments and French horn that John suggested are always in demand in amateur orchestras, though they aren't exactly the easiest of intruments to master!

(By the way, in various parts of the UK there is a rich, and quite remarkable, tradition of amateur Brass Bands. They originally grew out of heavy industry and the mining industry, and many play to an extremely high standard. Even Maurice Murphy, who was principal trumpet of the LSO and one of the leading trumpet players of his generation, started off playing in brass bands, as have so many other brass players in the UK.)


Edited by John_B (03/01/10 06:44 AM)

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#1385379 - 03/01/10 08:49 AM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: John v.d.Brook]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
If band is the only option, I would steer him away from clarinets and trumpets and see if he can learn oboe, French horn, English horn, bassoon, etc.


Is there a reason clarinet and trumpet are not good choices?

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#1385484 - 03/01/10 11:06 AM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: C.Y.]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Musically, it's probably all a wash, but as far as scholarship money goes, the least popular get the most.
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1385540 - 03/01/10 12:20 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrument [Re: C.Y.]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3156
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
If band is the only option, I would steer him away from clarinets and trumpets and see if he can learn oboe, French horn, English horn, bassoon, etc.


Is there a reason clarinet and trumpet are not good choices?


A band teacher starting out beginners has two problems: choose an instrument the child will succeed on, and end up with a balanced set of players.

If a child's first attempt produces something close to a musical tone, they are assumed to be more suited to this one. It may or may not be true. But some sets of teeth and lip muscles possibly make it much easier or harder to play trombone as opposed to oboe or flue. Maybe. A band teacher has almost no individual time to work on tone production, and few students have private teachers at first. So there's a bit of pressure to make a good first guess.

At the same time a band of all drums or all saxophones is very difficult to work with, and as musical fashions change what the kids come in wanting to play changes.

There is no call for sax in the classical world. There is no call for bass clarinet in the popular world. Clarinet, flute, trumpet, trombone, tuba are mainstream and don't go completely out of fashion, but pop music is played on guitar, drums, and synth. High school music is taught toward the wind ensemble that grew out of the military band that grew out of the brass band roughly 130 years ago. What the future will bring is anybody's guess. At one time accordion schools were packed with students, and ensembles of 100 players were not unknown.
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#1385575 - 03/01/10 01:07 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Piano*Dad Offline
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Registered: 04/12/05
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Loc: Williamsburg, VA
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Musically, it's probably all a wash, but as far as scholarship money goes, the least popular get the most.


Yeah, that's what I'm hoping for. grin
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#1385752 - 03/01/10 04:52 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: Piano*Dad]
Stanny Offline
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Registered: 11/08/06
Posts: 1461
I got a full tuition scholarship on clarinet. They usually need many more clarinets than oboes.
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Independent Music Teacher
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#1385816 - 03/01/10 05:54 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: Stanny]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Good for you. From discussions with college & conservatory teachers, this is really an exception. There must be at least 250 student clarinetists for every oboist.
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
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#1386305 - 03/02/10 08:55 AM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: John v.d.Brook]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Musically, it's probably all a wash, but as far as scholarship money goes, the least popular get the most.


So the popular ones like piano and violin are hard to get scholarship too?

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#1386372 - 03/02/10 10:38 AM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: C.Y.]
sherryk Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/21/10
Posts: 16
Loc: Indiana
From a musical standpoint, learning a 2nd instrument can only enhance and broaden the learning experience. I believe that my students benefit greatly from participating in band, choir and orchestra.

From a social standpoint, I must say that the adult friends that I have sustained over the years from high school are ones that were in band with me.
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#1386413 - 03/02/10 11:38 AM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: C.Y.]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7303
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Musically, it's probably all a wash, but as far as scholarship money goes, the least popular get the most.


So the popular ones like piano and violin are hard to get scholarship too?


CY, I don't know how familiar you are with college level education in the USA. Unlike many European countries, it is not free. We have private universities and public universities, which are partially underwritten through taxes.

Tuition, not room and board, runs from under $5,000/yr at public institutions to over $25,000/yr at elite private institutions.

To help students financially, there is tuition assistance. This is a combination of grants and loans, depending on what the student has enrolled in. Scholarships are completely different and are based on merit (or at least, that was the original concept - some are now based on other factors).

A college of music, within the university, may need certain instrumentalists to fill out their student orchestra. Those are most likely to receive financial grants. Consider it a incentive/bribe to attend that particular college. Your local chapter of the music teachers might offer a merit based scholarship to the student who has performed the most brilliantly. It can be used at any institution of the student's choosing.

Some institutions, like Peabody or Curtis, are fully underwritten by donors who appreciate the importance of the arts. There is no tuition to attend. In effect, each student is a scholarship student, as entrance is totally based on the student having achieved the highest possible level of mastery possible.

At music schools, there is a rough correspondence of student instrumentalists to the normal composition of the orchestra. Public university music schools also have strong band programs, again, because they are feeding grads to local schools throughout the state, and they, too, must support their athletic departments (who are major fund raisers for the universities).

To be clear, availability of student loans, usually a major component of student tuition assistance, is not a scholarship. It's deferred payment, albeit generally at a favorable interest rate.
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#1386490 - 03/02/10 01:06 PM Re: Piano Student, playing piano and playing a band instrume [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Betty Patnude Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 4896
Loc: Puyallup, Washington
I don't think it's being "popular" instruments that most band and orchestra kids play the clarinet, trumpet, flute or violins: I think the school music specialists and band/orchestra directors find the students with previous musical backgrounds usually in piano who can quickly adapt to the more challenging instruments such as bassoon, oboe, french horns and versatile percussionist. The "select" instruments are "selected" students.

Years ago in my high school both viola players (another girl and I) were also the piano accomplanists for choir and band. And, from my studio, the kids in band mainly have played bassoon, french horn, and percussion. Others have played trumpet, clarinet, flute and viola. These instrumentalists mentioned also took private lessons on their other instuments and played in MENC festivals (adjudication) and also State. One majored in basson (MM) another minored in trumpet. At present 2 of my former students are heavily involved in music at their middle and high schools and are considering become music educators. One is a percussionist, the other is french horn. Both are well established at the piano. Both are girls. One is also doing piano composition.

I think it's exciting when my piano students find their abilites transfer to voice, band and orchestra instruments or to composition. How they choose to spend their lives in music is a very personal decision for them. I'm honored to have been any part of their development as a musician.

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