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#1429291 - 05/03/10 10:45 PM Microphone for Recording Piano
FrankieFrank Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 04/07/10
Posts: 16
Any suggestion of microphone for use with piano? 88-key piano generate sound frequency from 27.5Hz to 4186Hz, but most microphone on the market has frequency range from 100Hz to 10000Hz.

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#1429312 - 05/03/10 11:50 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FrankieFrank]
Pianolance Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 1178
Loc: Nashville, TN
Many large diaphragm condensors have frequency responses from 20 - 20,000. There are lots of great choices. Mics from Shure, EV, Audio Technica, Neumann, AKG, Rode, Royer, Groove Tubes, and many others will work great. For a large diaphragm condenser you will need either phantom power or you can buy mics that are already USB ready and record right to your computer. To record in stereo (highly recommended for piano) you will either need two mics or a stereo mic which is essencially two mics in one mic housing. If you just want to make casual recordings, there are some great pocket studio type recording devices that do a very fine job and are super convienient. Sony, Yamaha, Tascam, Roland, Zoom, M-Audio and others make these.
_________________________
Knabe 5'2" Louis XV Walnut circa 1927
Very part time piano broker.

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#1429315 - 05/04/10 12:01 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Pianolance]
88man Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/11/08
Posts: 21
Loc: Boston
Depends on the pianist, piano, room, budget, desired mic pick up pattern, style of music, micing distance, recording chain, etc.

Studio Standard on a budget: Shure KSM141, several from Audio Technica

Classical Music Studio Standard: Schoeps CMC6 series, Sennheiser MKH series,

For my typical setup, I use a spaced pair of AKG C414B-XLS mics fed into a DAV BG-1 preamp into a Tascam DV-RA1000 recorder. I record in omni mode, with the mics 3-4ft from the curve of the piano.

Good Luck!

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#1429319 - 05/04/10 12:08 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Pianolance]
Grandpianoman Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/05
Posts: 2242
Loc: Portland, Oregon
There are many choices out there as Pianolance suggests.

I have had very good results with piano using the Avenson STO-2 mics. Not cheap, but VERY natural sounding. www.avensonaudio.com

Here is an example I recorded with the Avenson's.

Princess Lei's theme from Star Wars, recorded on my 1925 M&Hamlin RBB, pair of Avenson STO-2 mics using the Korg MR-1000 digital recorder. http://www.box.net/shared/16ruokxmz4

You can use a less expensive digital recorder than the Korg, such as the Zoom H4.

I also have a pair of Rode NT5 mics, which are good for piano as well. I now prefer the Avenson's. Here is an example of the NT5's.

Princess Lei's Theme from Star Wars, recorded on my 1925 M&Hamlin RBB, pair of Rode NT5 mics, using the Zoom H4 digital recorder. http://www.box.net/shared/7yjh945rnh

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#1429324 - 05/04/10 12:13 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Grandpianoman]
Pianolance Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 1178
Loc: Nashville, TN
I agree that the Avenson's are a very interesting choice. Great value for the money.
_________________________
Knabe 5'2" Louis XV Walnut circa 1927
Very part time piano broker.

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#1429333 - 05/04/10 12:23 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: 88man]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1301
Loc: Maine, U.S.
I use a Korg MR-1000 DSD recorder, a matched stereo pair of Earthworks CT20 small-diaphragm, omni-directional, condenser mics, high-quality (but unshielded) Monster mic cables, and two mic stands.

For classical piano I use A-B configuration, placing the mic stands eight feet out from the curve of my Baldwin Model L Artist Grand. The mics are parallel, their separation being 12 inches. The elevation of the mics on the stands is 4 1/2 feet with the mics pointing to the top rim of the open piano lid.

Understand that room acoustics, the piano, and the pianist are variables. So in any room, experimentation is essential to find the best distance from the piano. In the experimentation the 12" separation is an optimal constant and should not be changed.

You can listen to my Catoire recordings on Member Recordings here. The Earthworks mics are neutral and natural, that is, they do not add color to recordings. The "headroom" of these mics is incredible, as they are designed to be used with powerful instruments like the piano.


Edited by RachFan (05/04/10 12:25 AM)

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#1429341 - 05/04/10 12:40 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: RachFan]
Grandpianoman Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/05
Posts: 2242
Loc: Portland, Oregon
RachFan,

The Earthworks mics are an excellent choice, albeit somewhat more expensive than the Avenson's. If you need to save money and yet still get excellent results, the Avenson is a good choice. In fact, the Avenson uses the same capsule that Earthworks use. The headroom of the Avenson is also quite high and is ideal for piano, drums etc.

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#1429361 - 05/04/10 02:49 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Grandpianoman]
Del Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/03
Posts: 5062
Loc: Olympia, Washington
There is an interestng article on recording the piano at:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan08/articles/pianorecording_0108.htm

ddf
_________________________
Delwin D Fandrich
Piano Research, Design & Manufacturing Consultant
ddfandrich@gmail.com
(To contact me privately please use this e-mail address.)

Stupidity is a rare condition, ignorance is a common choice. --Anon

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#1429374 - 05/04/10 04:24 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Del]
Nigel Keay Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/04/08
Posts: 128
Loc: Paris
88man mentioned the Sennheiser MKH series. Sennheiser have another series, the Evolution, somewhat cheaper, but where the performance is a long way toward that of the MKH. I record with the e914 model and have a recordings page with several examples of piano in varying acoustics.
_________________________
www.nigelkeay.com

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#1429432 - 05/04/10 08:26 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FrankieFrank]
Larry B Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/03/09
Posts: 377
Loc: Boston
Originally Posted By: FrankieFrank
Any suggestion of microphone for use with piano? 88-key piano generate sound frequency from 27.5Hz to 4186Hz, but most microphone on the market has frequency range from 100Hz to 10000Hz.


Frequency range numbers will be meaningless here. Ten different kinds of mics with equivalent "frequency range" specs will all sound different from each other, and be suited to different purposes. Ignore the numbers and use your ears. For piano, look for a condenser mic (a pair, really), and, generally, one without too "tight' a pickup pattern (e.g. avoid those sold as primarily a vocal mic, like a Shure SM87).

These are all great suggestions from everyone. On the consumer-level side, I've had success with a pair of M-Audio Pulsar II, which run about $250/pair and sound pretty good for the price.

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#1429438 - 05/04/10 08:50 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Larry B]
Nikolas Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/26/07
Posts: 4982
Loc: Europe
I own the Earthworkds Audio QTC40, which I intend to use for recording a grand piano (baby grand Steinway, without any further information). I talked to the people of Earthworks in Frankfurt in April and they gave me some insights on how to place the mics (the one option was very near the board, and the other quite a few feet away).

The other thing to take care is the preamp you will use. I own a Grace Design m201 which is also neutral in the capturing.

(Both recomendations are rather expensive of course... )
_________________________
http://www.musica-ferrum.com

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#1429474 - 05/04/10 10:14 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Nikolas]
PianoMan1958 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/13/10
Posts: 501
Loc: Tennessee
We used a Shure SM81 to record a Yamaha C6 for some pre-wedding music. This condenser microphone has excellent frequency response and did a fantastic job in the recording and also as a pickup for the house system. I suppose you could use (2) of them in a cross pattern to achieve stereo sound.
_________________________
Jack in TN

Plays:
Yamaha C5 grand (home)
Kawai KG5 grand (church)
Roland RD300GX digital (jazz group)

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#1429592 - 05/04/10 02:52 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: PianoMan1958]
Dave Ferris Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/07
Posts: 1675
Loc: Glendale, Ca.
........

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2005 NY Steinway D, Nord Piano 2

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#1429593 - 05/04/10 02:57 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Nigel Keay]
Dave Ferris Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/07
Posts: 1675
Loc: Glendale, Ca.
.
_________________________
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2005 NY Steinway D, Nord Piano 2

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#1429775 - 05/04/10 10:31 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Dave Ferris]
Grandpianoman Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/05
Posts: 2242
Loc: Portland, Oregon
Del, that's an excellent, well written article, thanks, it's bookmarked!

Nice playing and recording Nigel.

Here are a few more examples of the Avenson's and the Korg MR-1000. What I like about them, they are pretty neutral, have a fairly high spl factor, and they are at a great price considering their quality. These are all recorded close mic, lid up and mics facing directly down, about 15 inches from the bass and about 20+ from the treble strings.

Warsaw Concerto Excerpt, played on the LX http://www.box.net/shared/jbrqqjbd9t

Music from Schindler's List http://www.box.net/shared/or76hllc9d

On a Clear Day http://www.box.net/shared/h50sbqivzh

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#1429858 - 05/05/10 03:25 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Grandpianoman]
Bunneh Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/08/08
Posts: 398
Loc: Berlin
Great info and links, thank you all!

What does everyone here think of a pair of Marshall labs MXL 604s for recording a grand? Is that a good choice for a total budget of $600-$1000? I was thinking of pairing them with a Tascam 122MKII interface for basic but high quality home recordings.
_________________________
aim for the moon - if you miss, at least you'll be among the stars.

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#1429983 - 05/05/10 12:05 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Bunneh]
FogAudio Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/09/09
Posts: 187
Loc: FL
Hey Bunneh,

Personally I like the sound of larger condenser mics on piano to get a nice warm tone on the low-end. I think a pair of Studio Projects B1s, or a B1 paired with a B3 for MS (www.studioprojectsusa.com). Also the mics grandpianoman identified from Avenson look to be a great pair of electret microhpones (which typically have a dead-flat response). If these indeed have the same capsule as the Earthworks mics, a stereo pair of those are an incredible deal for mid $500s. In fact, I'm tempted to sell off my more expensive pair of Audio Technica AT 4051s for a set of Avensons after hearing gpm's recordings!
I haven't heard many good things about MXL mics.

Regards,
Ryan

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#1429999 - 05/05/10 12:35 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FogAudio]
Pianolance Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 1178
Loc: Nashville, TN
I'm just curious if anyone has tried recording a piano with the new Blue Microphones Yeti USB stereo microphone. If so, how was your result? It looks to be a very simple way to record direcly to your computer. No preamp required and should work great with Audacity or Garage Band. I'm thinking of picking up one of these for the ease of use factor.
_________________________
Knabe 5'2" Louis XV Walnut circa 1927
Very part time piano broker.

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#1430031 - 05/05/10 01:24 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FogAudio]
Dave Ferris Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/07
Posts: 1675
Loc: Glendale, Ca.
.
_________________________
http://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

2005 NY Steinway D, Nord Piano 2

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#1430035 - 05/05/10 01:35 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Dave Ferris]
Grandpianoman Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/05
Posts: 2242
Loc: Portland, Oregon
Here is another example of the Avenson STO-2's at work, through the Korg. This is somewhat more in the classical vein. You are all aware I am sure, that mic placement makes quite a difference in the sound, as you can hear on this Gershwin piece. Again, a close-mic recording, lid up, mics facing down in the treble and bass.

Gershwin-Concerto in F, 1st movement, played on LX system, pianist is Matt Herskowitz http://www.box.net/shared/dpgxgm42sb



Edited by grandpianoman (05/05/10 01:41 PM)

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#1430436 - 05/06/10 01:32 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Grandpianoman]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1301
Loc: Maine, U.S.
A few thoughts on the messages above:

Another fine Audio Technica mic is the AT4022 which is very well suited to recording piano. Had I not decided on the Earthworks TC20s, the AT4022s would have been my next choice.

One of the nice features of the Korg MR-1000 is its ultra-high quality preamp. It also has phantom power and does mixing on board. The controls are super-easy to operate during recording sessions too. Unfortunately I don't use the new DSD recording format. The reason is that I post my recordings on the Internet, which are required to all be in MP3 format (to save hosting server space). There is no known format conversion program that can convert DSD directly to MP3. (Most conversion software has never heard of DSD.) Korg's own AudioGate software can indeed convert DSD to WAV, which in turn is convertible to MP3. But that's two steps. So to be more efficient I use the WAV format option on the Korg, then simply do a one-step conversion to MP3. If one were simply going to record for one's own pleasure without having to worry about format conversions, then DSD format would be the way to go. It's a wonderful sound.

A further observation on recording: Jazz and pops music can be recorded "close in", with mics inside the piano or right at the rim, as those pianists value the percussive sound of hammers on the strings, or music in the making. For that reason X/Y mic configuration is very commonly used as a close-in approach.

Classical music cannot be music in the making. Rather, it has to have a blended, polished, finished sound captured after the music has escaped from the piano and into the room. That's why for classical, A-B mic configuration is generally preferred with mics being placed four to eight feet out in front of the piano rim. (Desire for more more bass or treble is met by moving the parallel mics together (preseving separation) right toward the grand's tail, or left toward the line of the hammers. X/Y will not work as well, because beyond a distance of three feet from the piano, sight with your eye where the crossed mics are aimed. One will be overshooting the keyboard with its companion overshooting the tail of the grand, as most home music room grands are less than seven feet long. This is never an issue with parallel mics in A-B setup. In tandem, for classical, omni-directional mics produce a richer sound than cardioid mics, which are drier in sound.

Finally, small-diaphragm condenser mics have a distinct practical advantage over large diaphragm mics. That is, unlike any other musical instrument, the piano has the widest scale and myriads of overtones along with the fundamental tones. Small-diaphragms can move extremely rapidly to meet the demands for such complex capture, whereas the large diaphragms (wonderful for voice, violin, flute, guitar, etc.) cannot move as rapidly to cope with the pianos output.



Edited by RachFan (05/06/10 01:37 AM)

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#1430451 - 05/06/10 03:52 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: RachFan]
IceCreaMPiMP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/10/04
Posts: 58
Loc: Connecticut
I am seeing a lot of Condenser suggestions, I might actually suggest a ribbon mic. I'm currently using a pair of BLUE Woodpeckers, which have a bit more of a hyped upper end for a ribbon mic, but generally ribbons are less peaky than condensers and I could see many different ribbon mics sounding very nice on piano.
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#1430551 - 05/06/10 10:50 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: IceCreaMPiMP]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1301
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Ribbon mics as well as the Earthworks PianoMic System by design are placed inside the piano. So these are great for pops and jazz, but unsuitable for classical piano which requires distance between the piano and mics to achieve a fully finished and blended sound. The Earthworks TC small diaphragm condenser mic series is designed to record loud instruments, affords very tall headroom, and can easily take in stride with no clipping any peak thrown at them by a large, powerful grand piano.


Edited by RachFan (05/06/10 11:02 AM)

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#1430660 - 05/06/10 01:27 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Dave Ferris]
FogAudio Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/09/09
Posts: 187
Loc: FL
Yeah, the 4051's aren't too shabby. I have a stereo pair of the older 4051a and not the newer better 4051b's. Both have excellent SNR characteristics. Also, I think you meant SDC instead of LDC; the 4051's are small diaphragm.

Incidentally, I just put up a recording made with Studio Projects mics on the EBVT III thread on the technician's forum. Nick Mauel (from Nick's Piano) did the special EBVT III tuning on my Hailun HG-218 piano a few weeks ago which sounded really really good.

Recordings were done with Studio Projects B1 and B3 mics in an AB configuration. The B1 was on the bass strings and B3 (in omni mode) on the treble strings (omni to tone down the brightness and not get too much of a proximity affect, and also to get a little room sound). My signal chain was the following:

Presonus MP20 preamp
FMR RNC (very very slight compression in "Super Nice" mode)
Edirol R-09HR (in 24bit-88kHz)

RecordingWithStudioProjects

Regards,
Ryan

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#1430920 - 05/06/10 06:41 PM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FogAudio]
Dave Ferris Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/07
Posts: 1675
Loc: Glendale, Ca.
......
_________________________
http://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

2005 NY Steinway D, Nord Piano 2

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#1431245 - 05/07/10 04:02 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FogAudio]
Bunneh Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/08/08
Posts: 398
Loc: Berlin
Originally Posted By: FogAudio
Yeah, the 4051's aren't too shabby. I have a stereo pair of the older 4051a and not the newer better 4051b's. Both have excellent SNR characteristics. Also, I think you meant SDC instead of LDC; the 4051's are small diaphragm.

Incidentally, I just put up a recording made with Studio Projects mics on the EBVT III thread on the technician's forum. Nick Mauel (from Nick's Piano) did the special EBVT III tuning on my Hailun HG-218 piano a few weeks ago which sounded really really good.

Recordings were done with Studio Projects B1 and B3 mics in an AB configuration. The B1 was on the bass strings and B3 (in omni mode) on the treble strings (omni to tone down the brightness and not get too much of a proximity affect, and also to get a little room sound). My signal chain was the following:

Presonus MP20 preamp
FMR RNC (very very slight compression in "Super Nice" mode)
Edirol R-09HR (in 24bit-88kHz)

RecordingWithStudioProjects

Regards,
Ryan

Ryan,

I've finally had the chance to listen to all the recordings in this thread (great resource by the way!), and really prefer the sound of your Watermark recording - that's exactly what I would want to go for. Of course, it's hard to isolate the mics, as it could be a combination of the Hailun, the tuning, the signal chain, the room etc.

Some questions, if you don't mind too much: How much work is the mastering process with the B1/B3 combination? And how do you mix these 2 different mics in different modes anyway, just stereo with some crossover? If you were to record a piece mostly in the pp-p range, and then another with some big ff chords, would you change a lot in the setup? Any problems with using the A/B setup in a rather small ~220sq ft living room?

Thanks in advance!
Bunneh
_________________________
aim for the moon - if you miss, at least you'll be among the stars.

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#1431269 - 05/07/10 06:40 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Bunneh]
Grandpianoman Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/12/05
Posts: 2242
Loc: Portland, Oregon
Here is another example with the Avenson STO-2's in a slightly different position.

"Il Postino" http://www.box.net/shared/s4jke70s5l

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#1431319 - 05/07/10 09:27 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: Bunneh]
FogAudio Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/09/09
Posts: 187
Loc: FL
Thanks Bunneh for your kind remarks.

Actually, I have to give some credit to grandpianoman since the right and left channels required flipping for the sound that I wanted (which was to make it sound like what a pianist would hear). He did that as well as normalized the track to bring the volume up a little (something I had failed to do). So kudos to him!

Mastering the work was pretty minimal. I brought the track into Sonar 6. I added ~1 dB of shelving EQ on the high-end at about 13kHz (to compensate for the SPs which are a little dark on the high end). And I added just a touch of Lexicon reverb (about 4%), I don't remember the exact settings though - started with a hall program, where I played around with the RT 60 (or reverb time) settings until it sounded right. I then exported it to CD quality 44.1kHz/16bit (with Pow-R dithering to compensate for loss of dynamic range). Finally I converted to MP3 with winLAME (free software) before publishing.


There are definitely some caveats though to the AB recording. For reference I played back the recording in mono and it sounds horrible because of phase issues of the mics. This is always a cause for concern for AB recording but if you never plan on putting it on AM radio or another mono medium it shouldn't be too much concern. This is where an XY or MS technique works much better (at the expense of less stereo feel).

As for recording in a small space? 220 sq-ft isn't tiny but you really also want to consider the shortest length(that is almost always the ceiling) and the total cubic volume. Small spaces are always a challenge because you will have a large number of peaks and dips in the frequency response due to standing waves, which are especially apparent in the low-end (technically speaking each parallel wall may act as what's called a comb-filter and contribute to peaking and dipping across the frequency spectrum). Basically, it may end up sounding like you are recording in a box. I just started treating my project studio because it is similarly small in size. Recording engineers are quick to point out that the room is the most important part of the signal path to optimize. If you think this may be a problem I can forward you some info on room correction strategies. The HG-218 OTOH, is in our living room that is about 400 sq-ft with a 16 ft vaulted ceiling (which is wonderful for recording).

But regarding the mics. Your best bet is probably a stereo matched pair of cardioid mics and to close-mic the source (while avoiding too much proximity affect). The idea being to eliminate as much of the room as possible by close-micing. Additionally you will want mics that can respond to high SPLs - so a pair of LDC would be absolutely appropriate. Studio Projects B1s or pair of Rode NT1a/NT1000 would be on my short list.

As far as recording pp-p then on to another at ff. In 2 separate pieces this is not a big a problem, you will just want to ensure that your gain staging is appropriate for each song. "Gain staging" is the art of setting every component so that the peak of the song comes just under the limits of dynamic range for each device. But, if a single song has this amount of dynamic range then I definitely recommend a quality compressor (FMR RNC is inexpensive but very good). I have to warn though, proper compression is probably the most difficult thing to get right so simpler to use devices such as a Presonus Comp 16 on the low-end or a Universal Audio LA-2 on the high-end is recommended for non-engineer types.

Sorry for the long response, a lot of interesting subjects. If you are really serious about getting a quality recording, you might want to check any local studios to see if they offer a recording class. I did that myself at a fantastic studio called Celebration Sound in Rhode Island about 8 years ago (apparently they just won a 2nd grammy! www.celebrationsound.com).

Regards,
Ryan

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#1431390 - 05/07/10 11:00 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: FogAudio]
hv Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/18/04
Posts: 1226
Loc: Cape Cod
I've used inexpensive stereo Audio Technica at825 mics for years with pretty good results... I have 2 of them and still use them occasionally for dual-piano recordings. The current version is the model at4025 which is somewhat quieter. The baby grand pieces in this old thread were recorded with the at825... Baby Grands

Optimal distance to avoid proximity effects with this mic is about 12 to 14 inches.

My current prime setup for stage piano recording is a dpa 3521 stereo kit. It uses a pair of 4021 compacts which are essentially 4011 capsules squeezed into an inch-high case. The small form factor makes the mics almost invisible on stage and permits more height to position directly over the strings without hitting the lid. Here's a thread with some recordings made in a piano store with that setup: Steingraeber 130 upright

For recordings at home where I have more control I tend to go a different route. I like mid-side (M/S) recording. My fav is a U87 in figure-8 together with an Earthworks QTC40 for the mid. This was recorded that way: Peter Gink

Howard

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#1431407 - 05/07/10 11:15 AM Re: Microphone for Recording Piano [Re: hv]
rodmichael Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/08/08
Posts: 334
Loc: Maryland
I found these interesting sites on the AKG website. One of the microphones that AKG recommends (C 516 ML) would cost about $380/pair. The C 535 EB would cost about $600/pair. I think I have the three references in the order they have been generated on the AKG website (i.e., oldest to newest).

Recording grand/upright piano

Recording Classical Piano Music

Miking the Grand Piano

Best regards,

p.s., I don't know anything about this subject. I just did a bit of exploring to learn something, taking off from Del's post on the first page.


Edited by rodmichael (05/07/10 01:11 PM)
Edit Reason: Added post script and 2 additional site references.
_________________________
Rod Michael
Mason & Hamlin AA, SN 93018
Yamaha CGP-1000, SN UCNZ01010
Zoom Q3



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