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#1463620 - 06/26/10 09:31 PM Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2)
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDu_bx7Hqeg

My son played it in a recital a coulple months ago. Since we don't do grade exam, could you give him some suggestions like you are a judge at an exam?

How do you tell if a piece is too difficult for a student? Thanks!

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#1463636 - 06/26/10 10:29 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7409
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Well, your son did a very respectable job. Would that some of my students take Beethoven so seriously! Congratulations to you and your son.

It's difficult to comment too much on subtleties, because camcorders tend to compress sound greatly; then there's that annoying buzz and finally, the piano needs tuning.

Two technical things - I like my students to sit a bit more forward on the bench, and the bench to be a bit higher. You'll note that his elbow is below the playing surface of the keys. He's almost reaching for the keys, which impedes polished playing.

As you asked for criticism, let me note that he is relies a bit too much on the pedal for legato, and his left hand often is a bit heavy. Now, these are fine points, which teachers work to tweak, and I'm guessing your son's teacher has been working on as well.

If this were a master class, we might begin by shaping the opening phrase. And then finding direction for the remainder of the overall phrase (1st four measures), then we might look to do something a bit different for the next four, when the idea repeats. I could go on, but I haven't the time to go through measure by measure.

Rather, I'd like to suggest that, now that your son has this piece well in hand, you talk with your teacher about having him play this for a master class. I routinely have my advancing students play take a 30 min master class each year, where they play one piece and the master teacher comments and works with the student. Much of what they do with the student is an exact repeat of what I've covered, but because they are saying it in a different way, or approaching it differently, or just because the student is honed in very intently, many of the ideas "take hold."

I hope this helps you and your son.

John
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1463684 - 06/27/10 01:36 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Candywoman Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/14/03
Posts: 855
How long has he been playing this piece for? I tend to like better the other three pieces he's done.

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#1463708 - 06/27/10 03:24 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: Candywoman]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5558
Loc: Orange County, CA
I agree with John--your son is sitting too low. If he can't get an adjustable bench, then he might need a seat cushion.

First movement is brisk and secure. L.H. triplets could be softer. Mild rushing at times. I prefer a little more dynamic shading than what Beethoven notated.

For my taste, the second movement is too slow. This felt like a "work in progress." Also, his arm movement was a little excessive and broke up longer melodic lines into shorter ones.

The piece definitely does not seem too hard for your son. He just needs to work on it more, particularly the second movement.
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#1463814 - 06/27/10 11:06 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: AZNpiano]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
You guys are great. We have adjustable bench at home so it's not a problem for his practices. For lessons, I usually bring our foam floor mat and use it as seat cushion so my son can sit higher. I will remind my son to use seat cushion in the future recitals. The teacher asks for adjustable bench several times already, but I guess the school owner doesn't want to spend the extra money. I feel my son tends to move his elbows away from the body in the recitals, maybe he is trying to raise his elbows because the seat is too low.

John, Is it a good idea to talk with teacher about master class with another teacher(if teacher doesn't mention it first)? Doesn't it sound like you don't trust your teacher and want to find a master (more advanced) teacher? How does a master class work? Is it just like a regular lesson with a master teacher?

Candywoman, It took about 2 months for 1st mov and 1 month for the 2nd mov. What other 3 pieces are you referring to?

AZN, Since he learnt 1st mov first, it makes sense he is more comfortable playing it. Do you usually teach both fast and slow movements to kids? Although the slow movement is easier technically, I feel it's harder to play musically. Also the L.H. on the start of the 2nd mov (also throughout the piece), it's hard to play legato and control the sound for small hand. You can see my son need to move his L.H. left and right just to reach those notes.

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#1463829 - 06/27/10 11:49 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
Well, since you asking advice on a piano teachers website, it sounds like you already don't trust your child's teacher.
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B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#1463849 - 06/27/10 12:41 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: Minniemay]
Piano*Dad Offline
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Registered: 04/12/05
Posts: 10406
Loc: Williamsburg, VA
Originally Posted By: Minniemay
Well, since you asking advice on a piano teachers website, it sounds like you already don't trust your child's teacher.


I wouldn't rush to that conclusion. First off, curiosity often is best satisfied by hearing a wide selection of views. Secondly, a disinterested observer sometimes sees things that people who have been working with each other on a regular basis may miss. This is, after all, one of the virtues of attending master classes. Disinterested third parties also are safer in some ways, since personality and ego aren't big issues.

There is no need to suggest that distrust is at work. Doing so may start fights or put people off asking questions.
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#1463916 - 06/27/10 03:47 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7409
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
John, Is it a good idea to talk with teacher about master class with another teacher(if teacher doesn't mention it first)? Doesn't it sound like you don't trust your teacher and want to find a master (more advanced) teacher? How does a master class work? Is it just like a regular lesson with a master teacher?

Your son's teacher may be hesitant to mention it for several reasons; it's also possible that they might not be comfortable with the concept, but if you present it properly, I'm sure you could remove the "threat" aspect. It's also entirely possible that they've just never really thought about it and might actually welcome the opportunity to use master teachers/classes for their students.

Although many master teachers are, in fact, master teachers, many are just another set of ears and eyes.
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1463935 - 06/27/10 05:02 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
I still want to know why she isn't having these conversations with the child's teacher. If the parents of any of my students have questions, I would hope they would ask me.
_________________________
B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#1463971 - 06/27/10 06:06 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: Minniemay]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5558
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Minniemay
I still want to know why she isn't having these conversations with the child's teacher. If the parents of any of my students have questions, I would hope they would ask me.


I used to think like that, but I'm starting to realize that there are too many piano teachers out there and parents do have the right to a second (or third, fourth, fifth) opinion.
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#1463973 - 06/27/10 06:09 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
AZNpiano Offline
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Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5558
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
Do you usually teach both fast and slow movements to kids? Although the slow movement is easier technically, I feel it's harder to play musically. Also the L.H. on the start of the 2nd mov (also throughout the piece), it's hard to play legato and control the sound for small hand. You can see my son need to move his L.H. left and right just to reach those notes.


No, I'd never assign both movement to this sonata. Personally, I'm getting tired of the first movement, anyway, so for next year I'm having a student do the second movement only.

The second movement has quite a bit of octave reach. Can your son reach an octave without overstretching?
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#1464029 - 06/27/10 07:41 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: AZNpiano]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
I used to think like that, but I'm starting to realize that there are too many piano teachers out there and parents do have the right to a second (or third, fourth, fifth) opinion.


I agree that the parents have that right, but I think they need to start by asking the teacher the questions they have. If they feel like they need more answers after that, then seek outside advice. This is about open communication.
_________________________
B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#1464056 - 06/27/10 08:55 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: Minniemay]
bitWrangler Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/07
Posts: 1789
Loc: Central TX
Originally Posted By: Minniemay
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
I used to think like that, but I'm starting to realize that there are too many piano teachers out there and parents do have the right to a second (or third, fourth, fifth) opinion.


I agree that the parents have that right, but I think they need to start by asking the teacher the questions they have. If they feel like they need more answers after that, then seek outside advice. This is about open communication.


I agree that in a perfect world the OP wouldn't feel any qualms about being very upfront and asking the teacher if perhaps they made a mistake by assigning a piece that is too difficult for the student to master or perhaps they shouldn't have had him play that particular piece in a recital before it was up to speed (can you start seeing where things could start getting a bit touchy?). I won't even go into potential cultural conflicts regarding the status of teachers and what actions are considered respectful. Then again I guess in a perfect world the teacher would never assign a piece that's too advanced so it'd be a non issue wink

From a parents perspective (esp one who is not a musician/pianist), it's often difficult to gauge these things and that's why a forum like this really helps. It gives you a relatively safe sounding board to bounce these types of questions off of (no pun intended). I think it's perfectly reasonable to ask something like this here to get a sense for whether or not one is completely out in left field or if perhaps their thinking/concerns is/are reasonable.

It can be quite startling to the uninitiated just how many different opinions there are about this particular subject (and really almost anything related to playing). Coming from a situation where I knew nothing and was completely dependent on the teacher, to now having access to all sorts of resources (this forum, other teachers, other pianists, etc), I know that regardless of our kids teachers best intentions, having a broader base of knowledge is far better for the student (assuming you use that knowledge wisely of course wink )

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#1464077 - 06/27/10 10:08 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: Minniemay]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
John,
I am curious how much details the master teacher could cover in 30 min?

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#1464090 - 06/27/10 10:17 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
bitWrangler Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/07
Posts: 1789
Loc: Central TX
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
John,
I am curious how much details the master teacher could cover in 30 min?


I'm sure John will have an insightful answer for you, but I did want to say, having sat through quite a few masterclasses, that you should keep a couple of, related, things in mind. Don't forget the student when you're looking at the content and duration of something like a masterclass. Some "masters" are founts of very valuable information, but unless you're taking notes, recording, or your kiddo has a photographic memory, a lot of that stuff can just drop on the floor. So that said, at the very least take notes. If they allow for it, record the session. This way the student can refer to it, and ideally, the student and the primary teacher can go over the comments (video or notes).

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#1464094 - 06/27/10 10:20 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: AZNpiano]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano


No, I'd never assign both movement to this sonata. Personally, I'm getting tired of the first movement, anyway, so for next year I'm having a student do the second movement only.

The second movement has quite a bit of octave reach. Can
your son reach an octave without overstretching?


What I meant is do you usually ask students to learn all movements or mostly 1st or 3rd movement? I feel usually 2nd movement is easier but harder to play musically. And I heard many students would just learn 1 movement, then will move on to the next sonata.

My son can't play octave yet, that's why he needs to move L.H. left and right to play B-B-B. It will be much easier to play it legato and make good sound if he doesn't need to change hand position.

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#1464105 - 06/27/10 10:33 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
Minniemay,
bitWrangler pretty much answered your question for me. Another thing is for parents like us who don't know piano at all, we don't even know if there are questions we should ask our teachers.
I have seen many times here that teachers complain about the transfer students who have serious problems. Maybe their former teachers tried to correct it, but it could be the students/parents not aware of those problems.
Like I said in the original post, I am looking feedbacks from teachers like you would get from a grade exam. I guess I do want to know that if my son develop some bad habit and generally if he did OK for this piece.

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#1464114 - 06/27/10 10:49 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
John v.d.Brook Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7409
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
John,
I am curious how much details the master teacher could cover in 30 min?

Obviously, not a lot, but still, a lot. Master classes in general are when students already know the music well and perform it from memory. So they don't have to cover the basics. Also, if I go through the Exposition with a student, then one hopes that the student will apply that to the Development and Recapitulation (we're discussing sonatas here). My more advanced students do 45 min or 60 min master classes. But often cover more repertoire.

What I'm saying is that the masterclass instructor is giving the students new ideas and a fresh outlook on the music. All it took was one of us to comment on your son's bench and sitting position at the piano. I'll bet this is never a problem for him again, but it took a second set of eyes, and of course, it helps when you understand the reason why.

The comments by BW on recording the class is invaluable. I set up a camcorder and record each masterclass; I keep a copy and give the student a copy. And we go through it together!
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

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#1464150 - 06/28/10 01:14 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Candywoman Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/14/03
Posts: 855
I meant the other three youtube videos you uploaded.

I don't think a couple of months is anywhere near enough to absorb a piece musically, and so I agree with the others that this is a work in progress.

I don't object to the poster wanting information but I don't like the idea of us giving him too much information for free. That's why adjudicators, who give these types of assessments, are worth every penny and then some. Or other piano teachers who are getting paid to offer a second opinion.

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#1464154 - 06/28/10 01:35 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5558
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
What I meant is do you usually ask students to learn all movements or mostly 1st or 3rd movement?


I seldom assign an entire sonata or sonatina, unless it's for a competition or something. It's usually one movement and move on. I like to start with 3rd movements (rondo form) because they are more repetitive and easier to learn.

If your son can't reach an octave, then he should learn more Bach (2-part stuff). Don't overstretch.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#1464192 - 06/28/10 04:53 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: AZNpiano]
btb Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/21/04
Posts: 4263
Loc: Pretoria South Africa
Beethoven Sonata Opus 49-2

The advanced numbering of this sonata had me confused ... how could someone who had cranked out masterpieces like the Pathetique Opus 13, Moonlight Opus 27-2 and Pastoral Opus 28 possibly come up with such a simplistic "pot-boiler" like Opus 49-2 ... but research revealed that this sonata was published in early days, when Beethoven was only 25 years old ... before his short-lived tuition with Haydn and Mozart.

As such, the early sonata format is in single-note outline for two hands ... with sparsely included chords (small for little hands) ... a breeze for the bright little Eastern boy in the video (playing for his proud Dad/Mum) ... and clearly able to memorize the work (top marks!).

But now to the leading question by C.Y.

"How do you tell if a piece is too difficult for a student?"

Up till now, the lad can cope with memorizing the single-note outline ... but sight-reading and memorizing more complex music with multi-note chord format is likely to prove much more of a test ... a case of suddenly becoming aware of only reaching the foothills of Everest.

A top-qualified Piano Teacher will be able to recommend the next stage of progress ... when sight-reading skill will suddenly become top priority.

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#1464788 - 06/29/10 02:24 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: btb]
bitWrangler Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/07
Posts: 1789
Loc: Central TX
C.Y. I can tell you that my daughter spent considerably more time than your son on that particular piece (so much so that she grew tired of it) and there was a significant amount of work on very very small details. Her teacher is very detail oriented and while she got the basics of the piece (e.g. getting all the notes played "correctly") relatively quickly, it was the myriad of details that ate up the significant portion of the time spent on that piece.

So part of the answer to your question might be (and I believe this has been brought up earlier) that it's not necessarily that your son isn't ready for the piece, simply that given more time to perfect it, that he'd be able to get even further along.

Amusingly enough, I myself pondered posting a video of her performing it and querying the teachers here to get some feedback. Alas, the one decent recording we had was not a recording of one of her best performances (it was pretty much the last time she played it and she was so tired of the piece she basically blew through it and left out many of the details that she labored so hard to perfect) so I decided against (figured a lot of the feedback would be stuff that we would find obvious because of this lack of details).

P.S. you can look at some of the other kiddos performing the same piece (since it's popular to assign to youngsters) to get a general feel for how it's performed. Unfortunately you don't get a lot of info on the performers (e.g. how long they've been practicing it) so it's a bit hit or miss.

P.P.S. you can probably ignore 98% of the youtube comments on any videos you see. The overwhelming majority tend to be of the "the kid's a prodigy" or "I played that piece with I was 2 with a sippee cup in one hand" kind.


Edited by bitWrangler (06/29/10 02:25 AM)

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#1464903 - 06/29/10 08:23 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: bitWrangler]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
bitWrangler,
That's good information to know. Candywoman also said a couple of months is not enough. Is this the standard for every piece in this level? To be honest, I am not sure my son or I can stand it (hearing the same piece every day for say more than 3 months). Does diminishing returns apply to polishing a piece? Would it be better to come back to a piece after the kid is older, more advanced and maturer?

We don't do grade exam or competition and we have 4 or 5 recitals every year. Should I ask teacher to stay on a piece longer instead of moving on to the next one?

Just curious for teachers, will my son pass this piece in the grade exam?

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#1464905 - 06/29/10 08:27 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: AZNpiano]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano

If your son can't reach an octave, then he should learn more Bach (2-part stuff). Don't overstretch.


He is still in little prelude, teacher may think 2-part is still too hard for my son.

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#1464934 - 06/29/10 09:50 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5558
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano

If your son can't reach an octave, then he should learn more Bach (2-part stuff). Don't overstretch.


He is still in little prelude, teacher may think 2-part is still too hard for my son.


Many preludes are written in 2-part. 2-part merely means how many voices are in the piece. I think you got confused with 2-part Inventions. There are lots of dances from suites that are 2-part and will help your son along with technique.
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#1464942 - 06/29/10 10:06 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11808
Loc: Canada
Different teachers have different approaches. They also work toward an overall picture which they alone know, and teachers in a forum will not know.

For example, some teachers like to give a student a broad exposure to different pieces for an experience base, and then later refine. In that way the student is operating in a context. The goal is not to produce perfect performances, but to gain that first overall picture of music. It's a bit like giving an outline and then filling in the detail. Or like gradually bringing things into focus, they way a sculptor begins with a lump that eventually takes shape.

Other teachers like to carefully build each ability to near perfection from the beginning, so that the student has an excellent foundation from the very beginning - like being in focus from the very start. They argue that weaknesses in the beginning will stay and have to be battled forever after. These teachers might be horrified at what the first teachers do, and vice versa.

Still other teachers might not have the goal of forming the student, but of helping the student produce perfect pieces that get increasingly hard.

A teacher may also use a mix of any and all of these approaches, based on the student's personality and wishes.

Given all of that, it is not possible for anyone to say whether your child's teacher is using a right or wrong approach, and what this teacher ought to be doing, because there are many answers.

If your child is doing well, progressing, and is generally happy with lessons and practising, then maybe everything is as it should be. Otoh, if there are problems, that may be the time to probe.

(Opinion of a student & parent of now-adult once-student)

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#1464981 - 06/29/10 11:02 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: C.Y.]
bitWrangler Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/07
Posts: 1789
Loc: Central TX
Originally Posted By: C.Y.
bitWrangler,
That's good information to know. Candywoman also said a couple of months is not enough. Is this the standard for every piece in this level? To be honest, I am not sure my son or I can stand it (hearing the same piece every day for say more than 3 months). Does diminishing returns apply to polishing a piece? Would it be better to come back to a piece after the kid is older, more advanced and maturer?

We don't do grade exam or competition and we have 4 or 5 recitals every year. Should I ask teacher to stay on a piece longer instead of moving on to the next one?

Just curious for teachers, will my son pass this piece in the grade exam?


You bet it can be a bit tiring to work on the same piece for greater than a couple of months (or even weeks if it's baroque wink ). I think it has to be a combination of the teacher making sure that progress is really being made and the student being of the proper temperament to be able to deal with the "grind" (and to a lesser extent the parents). As to whether or not it's "worth it", I think it's hard to say. In many cases it's that hard fought last 10% that really transforms the piece from what 99% of others will do. I can tell you that it's that last 10% that made us really appreciate having a good acoustic vs a very good digital.

I realize this doesn't really answer your question, but then again, it can't. Really in the end it's up to your son, his teacher and yourself to determine which general direction you want to go. What we tend to do is to have one "deep dive" piece that we'll squeeze every bit to technique, musicality, instruction, etc from. Then surrounding that will be smaller easier pieces that come and go. I don't know if your son would get burnt out on such a regiment or not. As I mentioned in a previous post, even our daughter got burnt out on the sonata, but she toughed it out and we still follow the same basic model today.

We don't do graded exams either, but we do competitions. We also do the MTA festivals (not as good as a master class since it's not interactive, but some feedback none the less). The competitions really help to have a clear target in mind when working up a piece as well as getting feedback (for those competitions where feedback is given).

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#1465027 - 06/29/10 12:41 PM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: bitWrangler]
Piano*Dad Offline
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Excellent set of points, BitW. The degree of mastery achieved is a function of so many things. Time spent on a piece is important, but so is the set of goals the teacher has in mind for this piece (and overall), and the patience and attention to detail that your son displays at this point in his training. These three are, of course, all interrelated.


C.Y.,

Have you sat down with the teacher to discuss his/her approach to music and to ask what sort of long run goals seem appropriate for your son? Have you articulated your own goals clearly? I know in my own case, my goals and the teacher's approach evolved, sometimes quickly, as my son's technical abilities expanded and his patience for detail work improved.
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#1465549 - 06/30/10 09:15 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: Piano*Dad]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
keystring, bigWrangler and PianoDad,
Thanks for the advices and offering your experience. I don't really know what our goals are. I don't think I ever said to teacher about our expectations. Maybe it's time for me to think about it.

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#1465551 - 06/30/10 09:19 AM Re: Looking for comments (Beethoven Sonata Op. 49 No. 2) [Re: keystring]
C.Y. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/30/08
Posts: 391
Originally Posted By: keystring

If your child is doing well, progressing, and is generally happy with lessons and practising, then maybe everything is as it should be. Otoh, if there are problems, that may be the time to probe.


I guess for parents without music background, how do we know if our child is doing well and progressing? How do we know if there are problems?

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