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#1467718 - 07/03/10 05:56 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: TrapperJohn]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3161
Originally Posted By: John Frank

Besides, maybe it's the teachers who instill all the bad habits anyway...


Actually, its the "bad" teachers who instill bad habits.
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

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#1467719 - 07/03/10 06:00 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: moscheles001]
tangleweeds Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012


Registered: 12/21/08
Posts: 1269
Loc: Portlandia
@keyboardklutz: I'm really curious about the motivation behind your self-teaching on violin. And I'm also very curious about how your experience, both as teacher yourself and as a beneficiary of good tuition, illuminates the process of teaching yourself, i.e. how this informs your choice of materials to play and learn from, and how you monitor your technique on a new instrument.
_________________________
Oops... extremely distracted by mandolins at the moment... brb

neglected piano blog

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#1467726 - 07/03/10 06:20 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: tangleweeds]
moscheles001 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/13/08
Posts: 753
Loc: Northeast Pennsylvania
Tangleweeds, How do you like your Privia?

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#1467733 - 07/03/10 06:39 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: moscheles001]
tangleweeds Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012


Registered: 12/21/08
Posts: 1269
Loc: Portlandia
I'm really happy with it. The keyboard action is very comfortable for me, much better than my PX-120, which kinda needed to be pounded on. The piano sounds are better too.

I'm particularly in love with the feature that allows me to input midi files created with hands-separate parts, so I can practice one hand at a time, but hearing how each hand's part interlocks with the other hand's part (and not just with built in tunes, but with any tune I want to make a midi of). There's also a looping mechanism within this mode, for concentrating on problem measures. Very practice-friendly.

I've been working on playing some basic blues, and the built-in rhythms are lots of fun. They are editable somehow, but the instructions for this needed a better technical writer or something (I've found the instructions for other features pretty clear).

My biggest gripe with it is that the labels on the buttons are written in fine-print grey text on black plastic, which is impossible for my middle aged eyes to read without intensive peering. I'm just memorizing the locations of useful buttons.
_________________________
Oops... extremely distracted by mandolins at the moment... brb

neglected piano blog

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#1467758 - 07/03/10 08:03 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Ejay]
tangleweeds Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012


Registered: 12/21/08
Posts: 1269
Loc: Portlandia
Originally Posted By: Ejay
How true.It is so easy to practice mistakes.

What do you think is the correct approach to fixing a recognised mistake ?

A book which really influenced my philosophy on mistakes is _The Perfect Wrong Note_ by William Westney. What I drew from it was not to "waste" mistakes, by glossing over them by saying to myself, "Wow, that was random!" or "Dangit, I always mess up that part." I try to see each mistake as a message to be decoded.

But the art, for me, comes in slowly narrowing down where the flow of music gets disrupted. Like someone said, an issue in one hand might actually expose a weakness in the other. Sometimes it's just that my fingers need to learn to move in an unaccustomed way, but instead they try to do something familiar, and then it's just a matter of practicing the unfamiliar motion, and imprinting the sensation of doing it right. Another common pitfall for me are the bits which I am generally able to play by ear and intuition and half-grown muscle memory, but don't actually know the specific notes I'm playing, so if my concentration falters, I have nothing to fall back on. There are so many reasons for mistakes -- I'd love to see a collaborative database of all the interesting reasons we've found behind our various mistakes.

I do feel that this is the sort of area where having a teacher could be very helpful, as input from someone with experience with the sorts of mistakes learners make, and what can cause or fix them. But I am also on a fixed income, so at best I could maybe afford one lesson a month... which I suspect would still leave me mostly self-teaching.

But given that self-teaching is a necessity for me, I do find that it has many positive aspects. I get a lot of enjoyment from selecting my own material, and playing pieces that make me happy contributes hugely to my level of motivation. I have a hard time staying motivated once my inner music snob starts frothing in outrage at the vapid excuses for music which our beginner-ness has condemned us to attempt to play. My main memory of childhood piano lessons was always wondering how and why they managed to come up with such dreary music for me to learn on.


Edited by tangleweeds (07/03/10 08:05 PM)
Edit Reason: shoulda used preview :P
_________________________
Oops... extremely distracted by mandolins at the moment... brb

neglected piano blog

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#1467760 - 07/03/10 08:09 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: tangleweeds]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17778
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
Somebody wise (I think it was ShiroKuro) once said on another thread a long time ago that "self-teaching" is a bit of a misnomer, because we self-teachers are obviously learning piano from someplace, be it working through a method series on our own, watching tutorials on YouTube, coming here, etc.

At this stage of my learning adventure, my most common and valuable source of help is this forum. If I'm having trouble with a particular piece, odds are that somebody else has played it before me and can offer suggestions for fingering etc. I learn a lot from reading various threads here and in the pianist corner and teacher's forum in terms of tips for how to handle specific technique issues.
_________________________
Mason & Hamlin A -- 91997
My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/pianomonica

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#1467764 - 07/03/10 08:26 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Monica K.]
moscheles001 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/13/08
Posts: 753
Loc: Northeast Pennsylvania
I think that the main cause of mistakes in my playing arise from the fact that the Yamaha factory which made my Clavinova was built on top of an ancient Indian burial ground, and is therefore cursed. But thanks to Hanon and a garland of garlic, I am able to muddle through.

laugh

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#1467767 - 07/03/10 08:38 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: TrapperJohn]
starbug Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/09
Posts: 238
Loc: Scotland, United Kingdom, Sol,...
Originally Posted By: John Frank
Self-teaching going on 5 years and still srongly motivated and loving the journey - you know what good piano music should sound like and if what you're doing doesn't sound like that then keep working on it until it does - that's all the instruction you need


Way to go.. great encouraging quote for addition to this thread smile

I'm almost 1 year on now.

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#1467776 - 07/03/10 08:55 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: moscheles001]
Ejay Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 216
Loc: U.K.
ROFLOL !!!

You need a teacher !! They have got to hear that excuse, best I have heard yet !
_________________________
Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.
Maya Angelou


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#1467813 - 07/03/10 10:37 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: moscheles001]
Emissary52 Online   happy
Full Member

Registered: 10/17/09
Posts: 318
Loc: Monroe, NC USA
Oh no! This is a startling development! I'm nearly done with Alfred's Book 1. I was hoping to rent out Carnegie Hall for my 60th birthday in October 2012. I figure by then, I should be through with Alfred's Book 3 and therefore, almost a "pro". I'm another person going it alone without a teacher! I hope all of those teen-age girls and their "hot cougar moms" will not be disappointed with my performance! In lieu, of not having a teacher, does everybody think that including Justin Bieber or the Jonas Brothers as an opening act, might cover any deficiency caused by a lack thereof?

Please advise!

-Craig
_________________________
I'm Craig, I'm retired, It's Saturday every day!
Alfred's Masterwork Classics Vol 3 and Vol 4
YDP-160, GH-170R
Alfred 1 Graduate

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#1467834 - 07/03/10 11:23 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Emissary52]
Day Dreamer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/23/10
Posts: 32
This is a very exciting thread. It makes me feel less depressed that I'm not the only one on this boat. I'm with you guys...

From what I see, one needs great deal of motivation, self-discipline and never-give-up attitude in order to successfully self-teach.

Anyways, people say that with a teacher you would progress much faster? Is it true?

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#1467858 - 07/03/10 11:57 PM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Day Dreamer]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3161
Originally Posted By: Day Dreamer

Anyways, people say that with a teacher you would progress much faster? Is it true?


Actually, one task good teachers constantly do is slow down their students.
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

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#1467863 - 07/04/10 12:09 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Day Dreamer]
dat77 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/19/10
Posts: 31
I am also teaching myself. I did take lessons around 10 years ago but right now I cannot afford it. I also like the idea of doing the kind of music I like. I am not really sure exactly what direction I will go in but I like it I can choose that myself. I am doing a mixture of Alfred's, scales, classical(succeeding with the masters) and just started a dvd on ear training. I think having a self-teaching support thread will be a good idea!

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#1467888 - 07/04/10 01:34 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: moscheles001]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: moscheles001
So those of us who can't get a teacher are just doomed to failure?
No, just failure to reach your true potential.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1467894 - 07/04/10 01:49 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: tangleweeds]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: tangleweeds
@keyboardklutz: I'm really curious about the motivation behind your self-teaching on violin. And I'm also very curious about how your experience, both as teacher yourself and as a beneficiary of good tuition, illuminates the process of teaching yourself, i.e. how this informs your choice of materials to play and learn from, and how you monitor your technique on a new instrument.
Excellent question! I studied with a very influential and knowledgeable teacher, after a whole bunch of life ruining duds, for about 10 years. I realize she didn't so much teach the piano as how to enable the body to play music on an instrument (in fact she was well known for fixing violinists' and guitarists' playing injuries) - so I have very fixed ideas about how to go about the violin and have yet to observe any violinist I agree with. Were I to engage a teacher we'd be at hammer and tongs in no time!

It's all about tension - you can always add it, taking it away is an enormous effort (funny enough). But also it's about music. I surprised myself on guitar (self taught) a few years ago - I played a piece (Albeniz' Leyenda) that I'd learned as a teenager but it came out musically! Without knowing it I had learned not only to listen but what to listen for.

In a nutshell there's two things you must learn - how to allow your body to get on with a task and, quite a separate skill, what music is.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1467902 - 07/04/10 02:15 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: ten left thumbs]
KrystalKai Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/24/10
Posts: 23
Loc: Europe
Originally Posted By: ten left thumbs
I for one would be very happy to see a thread dedicated to positive energy around self-teaching.


Agreed. The question of whether or not having a teacher is better is moot. The fact is, for whatever reason, there are some us that are either stuck having to or choosing to self-teach.

I'm also a bit frustrated with the amount of posts in this forum that inevitably ends with, "Do you have a teacher?" If I had a good teacher who I trusted, do you really think I'd be posting the question on this forum? Get off your high-horse and stop hijacking the threads and changing them all into discussions about why having a teacher is better.

And I'd like to add that *some* of us are emotionally charged to the points of being overwhelmed, stressed, and depressed about not having access to a good teacher but we're still doing the best we can with what we have - which is why we're on this forum!
_________________________
Kobrat 83 Digital Piano, working on ABRSM level 1
Please don't recommend a teacher.. it's a sore subject.

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#1467908 - 07/04/10 02:39 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: tangleweeds]
hawgdriver Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/13/09
Posts: 637
Loc: Denver, CO
Originally Posted By: tangleweeds
It seems to me that there are a lot of us doing it but not talking much about it, because it's just not comfortable to bring around here.


You are right. This thread is overdue. If we put aside the discussion of the merits of self-learning, and just have a discussion about self-learning, there are a lot of fun discussions about the experiences.

There seems this underlying dynamic:

A: "I'm teaching myself."
B: "That's not wise."
A: "Why?"
B: "Trust me." or "It's a known fact. It's a law of physics." etc. [as an aside, it would be terrific if anyone had some numbers or figures to make this point]

Autodidacts tend to be intelligent (often highly so) and learn things differently than others. I hope this doesn't sound haughty, but... I think I have a knack for identifying the most efficient means of learning something. My personal experience is that I've been able to teach myself in less time than it takes an instructor to communicate. That's the bottom line. It's reasonable to infer this may apply to learning an instrument.

Experience matters. Had I not taken lessons I would have missed several crucial concepts that would have impeded my efficient progress.

However, sometimes I have to bite my tongue in lessons. My teacher often falls back into 'standard student' mode and wastes time with things that do not help me progress. I feel like lessons are 90% filler and 10% impact. I'm just afraid that if I miss the 10%, I'll be 'crippled' so to speak.

This is kind of how it's been for me forever, and I wouldn't be surprised is there were dozens just like me reading this. Hard to find someone with experience teaching someone who learns things quickly and has tons of discipline to drill in my own time.

This is all fine for me to say, but I'm not a virtuoso pianist who is filling concert halls. Who really gives a rat's butt about my un-credentialed opinion? No one should. I imagine if you had the right match of student and teacher that is ideal. [thinks to himself, 'perhaps I should explore this.']

I'd love to be able to talk to a self-taught master with some talent and deft sensitivity on the keyboard so I can learn from their own exploration. Good call on the thread. However, I believe orthodoxy will win the day, as most masters followed the tried and true path. Would be interesting to hear of one who did not and has wisdom to share.
_________________________
Only in men's imagination does every truth find an effective and undeniable existence. Imagination, not invention, is the supreme master of art as of life. -Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski

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#1467916 - 07/04/10 03:07 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: KrystalKai]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: KrystalKai
Get off your high-horse and stop hijacking the threads and changing them all into discussions about why having a teacher is better.
Struth.

The real question is is the wish to excel a duty or a compulsion? For me it's the former.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1467933 - 07/04/10 04:22 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Monica K.]
ten left thumbs Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/22/09
Posts: 3336
Loc: Scotland
Originally Posted By: Monica K.
Somebody wise (I think it was ShiroKuro) once said on another thread a long time ago that "self-teaching" is a bit of a misnomer, because we self-teachers are obviously learning piano from someplace, be it working through a method series on our own, watching tutorials on YouTube, coming here, etc.


I would go further. The more I teach (not so much piano, but other stuff) the more convinced I am that there is no such thing as teaching. There is only learning. Each of us has to work out how to learn, and no-one can make you do it.
_________________________
I am a competent teacher.


www.justfingers.co.uk
www.babysinging.co.uk

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#1467934 - 07/04/10 04:25 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: keyboardklutz]
ten left thumbs Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/22/09
Posts: 3336
Loc: Scotland
Originally Posted By: keyboardklutz
Originally Posted By: moscheles001
So those of us who can't get a teacher are just doomed to failure?
No, just failure to reach your true potential.


And it doesn't bother you that you will never reach your full potential as a violinist?

Seriously, though, I don't understand how you can predict with such certainty the potential failure of other people.
_________________________
I am a competent teacher.


www.justfingers.co.uk
www.babysinging.co.uk

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#1467939 - 07/04/10 04:40 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: ten left thumbs]
btb Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/21/04
Posts: 4261
Loc: Pretoria South Africa
Hi klutz,
Can't resist a wag.

"Saying that, I'm self learning the violin!"

No wonder you haven’t any friends ... oh, Royal Greek-iness.

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#1467942 - 07/04/10 04:45 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: ten left thumbs]
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
This thread seemed like a good idea.

Instead, it did the opposite of what other threads do. Rather than say "Oh, you can't self-learn, get a teacher!", it's become "you can self-learn better! teachers, psh!"

Self-learners are a dime a dozen. What's the point in it for you? Why are you studying? That's what really matters. The only time a teacher becomes important is when you decide that you aren't playing musically enough, you realize that there is something wrong (ie, tension) that you'd like someone to fix, or if you want to join the ever-useful 'in' of the musical world.

I don't always agree with my teacher. And a lot of times, she says things in a way that just makes me want to burn the piano because it makes no sense even with all the "Does that make sense?" added right after. But I can see more merit in having one than self-learning - that is, for my purposes. Not necessarily for everyone else's.

Just two things scare me.
1) Playing unmusically.
2) Hurting myself.

If neither of those happen to you... you don't need a teacher. At least, not yet. One day, maybe, but enjoy yourself.

Also, go back to what this thread was originally about. How about some resources and support for those self-learning, instead of arguing which is better, which was the original reason of creating a thread just for this purpose?

GOOD LUCK TO SELF-LEARNERS!
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

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#1467951 - 07/04/10 05:26 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: ten left thumbs]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: ten left thumbs

And it doesn't bother you that you will never reach your full potential as a violinist?
I will be having lessons when I'm at an appropriate stage.

Originally Posted By: ten left thumbs
Seriously, though, I don't understand how you can predict with such certainty the potential failure of other people.
I suppose there has to be a first!
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1467953 - 07/04/10 05:28 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: btb]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: btb
Hi klutz,
Can't resist a wag.

"Saying that, I'm self learning the violin!"

No wonder you haven’t any friends ... oh, Royal Greek-iness.
On the contrary, I'm meeting lots of new violin friends!
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1467965 - 07/04/10 07:01 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: keyboardklutz]
gmm1 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/03/06
Posts: 1674
Loc: Spokane WA
I am "self-teaching" myself as well. I agree with Shiro that it is a misnomer.

I like the idea of this thread, and will participate. I am not as active as I used to be, but I still visit from time to time...

I feel it is important for beginners to see a teacher/mentor/player at the beginning to get some of the basics (position, height, distance from the keyboard, etc). My big mistake. Then, going it "alone" is OK in my book.

I agree that a teacher can help correct mistakes quicker and perhaps better than self driven trial and error. But, I have to ask, what is it about my way that is so wrong? I don't care that I am doing something wrong that will keep me from playing advanced pieces if I don't fix it now while it's easy. I can play this piece now. I am probably never going to reach that level anyway, so let me enjoy what I can do now.

Mistakes are relative. My goal is to enjoy myself now, not to play "correctly", whatever that means.

I will follow this thread with interest...
_________________________
"There is nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself." Johann Sebastian Bach/Gyro

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#1467969 - 07/04/10 07:26 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: gmm1]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: gmm1
But, I have to ask, what is it about my way that is so wrong? I don't care that I am doing something wrong that will keep me from playing advanced pieces if I don't fix it now while it's easy. I can play this piece now. I am probably never going to reach that level anyway, so let me enjoy what I can do now.

Mistakes are relative. My goal is to enjoy myself now, not to play "correctly", whatever that means.
The trouble is piano teachers have a kinda Hippocratic Oath which forbids them to allow you to hobble yourself.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1467983 - 07/04/10 08:15 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: gmm1]
Ejay Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 216
Loc: U.K.
I know my parents wasted a lot of money on guitar lessons with a bad teacher. I wasn't the type of kid who complained. I didn't tell them I could play better than the teacher. A teacher who listens to your pieces and doesn't teach is useless.

So although from grade 3 upwards I more or less taught myself, I found the mistakes he didn't correct tripped me up later on. Just as John Frank's signature says.
Poor technique and not correcting mistakes can limit us when we reach a certain level, and I imagine bad habits will take some time to overcome. So if we do progress further than we ever imagined we could, then yes we could lose the enjoyment , as frustration at our technique sets in.
At grade 7 I started to hate the guitar. I had to let it go for some time and just played folk instead of classical.

I think where I get nervous about self teaching, is what happens when I reach a plateau I cannot pass without a good teacher ? Will I get frustrated and will inability to progress spoil my enjoyment ?

I have heard a few people mention monthly lessons. How do teachers feel about this, I would imagine it difficult for them to keep that type of slot open ?
_________________________
Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.
Maya Angelou


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#1467993 - 07/04/10 08:25 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: Ejay]
MiM Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/09/09
Posts: 543
Loc: Pennsylvania
Where would you place experiences similar to mine? I knew I had to have a teacher to get going at the beginning...how to sit, how to place your fingers, the idea behind the notes on the staff, etc. That I'm sure you can save yourself a lot of time with a teacher. I kept the first teacher for about a year, then "tested" two other ones over the years for a few weeks.

However, now I don't think my issue is with having or not having a teacher. I know what I need to do. I have no problem knowing what a piece calls for, I know all the dynamics, etc. I can also view it played online if I want to. I do see value in a teacher being a cheerleader of some sort (an expensive one at that), but not really to teach me anything.
_________________________
Happy Playing All
http://www.box.net/shared/897uu7aqv4

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#1468002 - 07/04/10 08:41 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: MiM]
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Originally Posted By: Music_in_Me
I have no problem knowing what a piece calls for, I know all the dynamics, etc.
That's a lot of etc.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


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#1468009 - 07/04/10 09:03 AM Re: Self-Teaching Support Thread [Re: keyboardklutz]
MiM Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/09/09
Posts: 543
Loc: Pennsylvania
True, but I don't "think" the problem is learning deeper and deeper dynamics and variations thereof, beyond what the piece calls for. I do feel I will need some teacher's help when I get to some advanced classical pieces, but for now, I have no use for a teacher, other than for cheerleading.
_________________________
Happy Playing All
http://www.box.net/shared/897uu7aqv4

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A study of the practice behaviors of effective pianists
by lyricmudra
10/01/14 10:37 PM
Ease of play - Yamaha p35 or p105
by DeadPoets
10/01/14 10:37 PM
piano beats in groups
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10/01/14 09:42 PM
What to look for in a keyboard
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10/01/14 06:30 PM
Christmas duets for Student and Teacher
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10/01/14 06:24 PM
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