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#1469519 - 07/06/10 09:52 PM Once you've tried a 9-footer....
crogersrx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/25/08
Posts: 712
Loc: San Francisco, CA
My instructor recently went on vacation for a month, and since I am the only student of his that is a "cat-person" he asked if I could watch his house and cats, and keep the piano company. I have been playing his wonderful concert grand for 3-4 hours every day, and now I find that I don't love my own piano like I did before. I have actually starting scheming to buying a used concert grand... I wonder if I will adjust back to my piano once I don't have unlimited access to a concert grand, or will I just have concert-grand envy until I get one for my own?
_________________________
Cary Rogers, PharmD
San Francisco, CA
1887 Knabe 6'4" (Rebuilt)

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#1469525 - 07/06/10 10:01 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: crogersrx]
eweiss Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 2393
Loc: Beautiful San Diego, CA
Funny! That's what this guy says...

I don't often play piano, but when I do,



I prefer a nine footer! smile
_________________________
Play New Age Piano
http://www.quiescencemusic.com

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#1469535 - 07/06/10 10:17 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: eweiss]
88Key_PianoPlayer Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/02
Posts: 1904
Loc: El Cajon, CA
Now that I've played the Rubenstein 12-footer (although it's been a few years now), a baby 9- or 10-footer isn't good enough anymore. I know of an 18-footer-plus that's been built, but it only has 85 keys (the Rubenstein has 97).
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Associate Member - Piano Technicians Guild
1950 (#144211) Baldwin Hamilton
1956 (#167714) Baldwin Hamilton
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#1469544 - 07/06/10 10:36 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: 88Key_PianoPlayer]
crogersrx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/25/08
Posts: 712
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Originally Posted By: 88Key_PianoPlayer
Now that I've played the Rubenstein 12-footer (although it's been a few years now), a baby 9- or 10-footer isn't good enough anymore. I know of an 18-footer-plus that's been built, but it only has 85 keys (the Rubenstein has 97).


OMG!!! Now I can't even live with just playing a 9-footer... how will I ever go back to my 6'4"..... oh such a cruel fate!! laugh

But seriously, I loved my piano, but now that I get to play a concert grand every day, for hours on end, I wonder how I will get myself out of the obsession with having a huge piano.... (of course, I know that the pricetag might actually cure me of wanting a concert grand... LOL)
_________________________
Cary Rogers, PharmD
San Francisco, CA
1887 Knabe 6'4" (Rebuilt)

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#1469592 - 07/06/10 11:44 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: crogersrx]
doremi Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 1682
Originally Posted By: crogersrx
of course, I know that the pricetag might actually cure me of wanting a concert grand... LOL

Your tinnitus will cure you too eek
_________________________
I am doremi because I play scales
Had I progressed to playing chords, I would be domisol

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#1469627 - 07/07/10 01:05 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: doremi]
88Key_PianoPlayer Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/02
Posts: 1904
Loc: El Cajon, CA
Originally Posted By: doremi
Originally Posted By: crogersrx
of course, I know that the pricetag might actually cure me of wanting a concert grand... LOL

Your tinnitus will cure you too eek


Maybe..... BUT... just listen to that incredible clarity in the low bass on those big pianos!
Often when I check out a piano for the first time, the very first note I play is A0 (or whatever is the lowest note if it's lower), then a major chord around the middle of the piano for which that low note is the chord's base.
_________________________
Associate Member - Piano Technicians Guild
1950 (#144211) Baldwin Hamilton
1956 (#167714) Baldwin Hamilton
You can right-click my avatar for an option to view a larger version.

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#1469628 - 07/07/10 01:14 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: eweiss]
AJF Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/18/06
Posts: 1530
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: eweiss
Funny! That's what this guy says...

I don't often play piano, but when I do,



I prefer a nine footer! smile


Haha. I don't know how many times you've cracked me up on these forums but keep 'em coming:)

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#1469629 - 07/07/10 01:14 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: eweiss]
Horowitzian Offline
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/18/08
Posts: 8453
Originally Posted By: eweiss
Funny! That's what this guy says...

I don't often play piano, but when I do,



I prefer a nine footer! smile


Heck he can probably play the whole repertoire just by looking at the instrument. grin
_________________________
Close only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and nuclear weapons.

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#1469638 - 07/07/10 01:49 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Horowitzian]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 20748
Loc: Oakland
Used concert grands are fairly inexpensive. What is expensive is the place to put them.
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Semipro Tech

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#1469648 - 07/07/10 02:15 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: BDB]
88Key_PianoPlayer Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/02
Posts: 1904
Loc: El Cajon, CA
BDB, unless you're in a place like L.A., Bay Area or NYC, do you think it's possible that in the floor plan picture below, the piano would be more expensive than the house? wink



BTW... that pic is pretty much supposed to be the ENTIRE house... although I may need to lengthen it a little to make room for Adrian Mann's 5.7 meter piano. grin
_________________________
Associate Member - Piano Technicians Guild
1950 (#144211) Baldwin Hamilton
1956 (#167714) Baldwin Hamilton
You can right-click my avatar for an option to view a larger version.

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#1469675 - 07/07/10 04:19 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: 88Key_PianoPlayer]
andrew f Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/19/09
Posts: 120
Loc: Amsterdam



Hey, did someone sneak into my house and draw up blueprints?

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#1469788 - 07/07/10 10:12 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Horowitzian]
J_D Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/10/10
Posts: 303
Loc: Texas, USA
Originally Posted By: Horowitzian
Originally Posted By: eweiss
Funny! That's what this guy says...

I don't often play piano, but when I do,



I prefer a nine footer! smile


grin


By the looks of him, I think he also prefers a nine incher ;-)
_________________________
J.D.
Hailun 178

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#1469843 - 07/07/10 12:16 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: J_D]
crogersrx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/25/08
Posts: 712
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Just clarifying... My original statement of preference was for a 9-footer, not a 9-incher.... LOL.
_________________________
Cary Rogers, PharmD
San Francisco, CA
1887 Knabe 6'4" (Rebuilt)

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#1469869 - 07/07/10 12:50 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: crogersrx]
J_D Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/10/10
Posts: 303
Loc: Texas, USA
Understood. Of course I only meant the character in the picture posted by eweiss. LOL!!!
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Hailun 178

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#1470007 - 07/07/10 04:36 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: J_D]
Uncle George Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/08/10
Posts: 101
Loc: FL, USA
Sorry, but I have read that piano "obsession" is incurable and that the only treatment possible if having the object of your madness siiting in you house....so... I am eagerly anticipating a new thread about "My Quest for the Perfect Concert Grand".



Uncle George

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#1470036 - 07/07/10 05:32 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Uncle George]
BerndAB Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/17/10
Posts: 532
Loc: Germany
I actually play a ninefooter (Ohh Keeh.. 8 ft.9").

Plans were yet made to have a nineteenfooter - vertically installed. (Looking for suitable material to bear the expected 120-140 tons strings stress..)

There is always a cure for this. It is like the cubic inch question for muscle cars: nothing else can compete with cubic inches - only a lot more cubic inches.

Plans were made to put a tuned german MAN truck engine (23 litres) taken from an airport fire brigade (1600 HP) under the body of a 1966 Volkswagen Bus double cabin, garden keepers car, grey, rusty. For a topspeed >>200 mph. Frame, gearbox and brakes problems solved. Looking for tyres according to 3 tons weight @200 mph....

Imagine: German highway. Speed unlimited. Francfort - Darmstadt. South of Francfort airport. Straight north-south. No wind, no turbulences.. (hopefully..) Reference highway. 6 o'clock on saturday morning. Everybody else sleeping. Hunting, then passing a Porsche Turbo and an AMG 55 SLR with the shovel and other garden tools fittet at the rear H beam..

Express service for your garden!
_________________________
Pls excuse any bad english.

D 1877 satin black plain

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#1470212 - 07/07/10 11:09 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: BerndAB]
Brandon_W_T Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/18/10
Posts: 1940
Loc: Omaha, Nebraska
Aren't steinway Ds like 8'10?

Anyways....

The first piano that I ever remember playing is a Yamaha concert grand.

Oh my lord what a piano! One of the best concert grands I have ever played!

Man it makes my baldy look like an itty bitty baby. I hate going and playing longer and better pianos then having to go home to my old grand and upright that have their little issues. :P

Oh well. :P
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Home -
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Grandmas- New Hyundai petite baby grand

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1998 Bedient (Built about 45 minutes from me!) 2m/pedal 24 rank Cavaille-Coll style pipe organ

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#1470217 - 07/07/10 11:16 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: J_D]
crogersrx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/25/08
Posts: 712
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Originally Posted By: J_D
Understood. Of course I only meant the character in the picture posted by eweiss. LOL!!!


No offense taken... I just couldn't resist getting a line of my own in on that little tangent.
_________________________
Cary Rogers, PharmD
San Francisco, CA
1887 Knabe 6'4" (Rebuilt)

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#1470323 - 07/08/10 05:50 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Brandon_W_T]
BerndAB Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/17/10
Posts: 532
Loc: Germany
Originally Posted By: Brandon_W_T
Aren't steinway Ds like 8'10?


There are two general types of D grands.. The D's of today type were introduced 1884. They contain the new invented „Rim“ structure: wooden „veneer“ leafs glued together, which resulted in a case length of 274cm long = 8 ft. 10"

But the D name once was introduced some years earlier, 1878, as a new naming system for all Steinway grand types (A, B, C, D) renaming the former "style" numbers.

When the A grand was introduced 1880 it was the first with the new RIM patent. The name "D" was given first for the yet existing concert grands which had no glued rim and (1875 to 1884) a length of 270cm, 8ft. 9“ (me owning one)..

But the A to D names were introduced in 1878. My grand is from 1877, so my piano is still a "concert grand style 5“ or „centennial grand“, and not yet a D type, because my piano is „one year too old“.. OK, picking nuts..

So, Steinway timeline is:
...
1872 – pre centennial grands, 267 cm, new hammer action, yet no „Cupola“ cast plate, open pinblock
1875 – „Centennial Grand“ – 270cm, Cupola Plate, covererd pinblock – this type won the gold medal
1878 – names changed from „styles“ to A, B, C, D
(B and C were „reserved“ letters for grand types later to be designed)
1880 – first „Rim“ Grand: Model A-188
1884 – another „Rim“ Grand – Model D-274
...


So there are two D types:

1- D-270, built 1878 to 1884, a sample of maybe 370 of the 424 ever built „centennial grands“
2- D-274, built 1884 to nowadays, maybe several tens thousands


You can distinguish them by counting the bass keys:
D-274 type = 20 keys, D-270 = 17 keys

BTW The Wikipedia article does not reflect this detailed knowledge.. wink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steinway_D-274


Edited by BerndAB (07/08/10 05:54 AM)
_________________________
Pls excuse any bad english.

D 1877 satin black plain

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#1470359 - 07/08/10 08:33 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: crogersrx]
Gary at Encore Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/16/09
Posts: 250
Loc: Dallas, TX
Originally Posted By: crogersrx
... I wonder if I will adjust back to my piano once I don't have unlimited access to a concert grand, or will I just have concert-grand envy until I get one for my own?

Since you have an older Knabe.... One of the rebuilders that we use and really believe in has recently finished rebuilding a 9' Knabe grand that had been in a university concert hall. So maybe you should plan a weekend to try it and compare it with a 9' Petrof that we also have. Then I also know two dealers who have used 9' Baldwins which you can get for a good price. All of these are $35,000 or less.

So If you have the space you should at least get a great 7' piano. By the way many people love 7' to 8' pianos better than 9' pianos. In my openion you get all of the great sound and a faster action in a 7' to 7' 4" piano. The actions are faster because you have shorter key sticks with less mass to push up and down.
_________________________
Bluthner, Steingraeber, Pleyel, Hailun, Kemble, Baldwin, Story and Clark, Pearl River, Ritmuller and others (store owner)www.encore-pianos.com

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#1470393 - 07/08/10 09:49 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Gary at Encore]
crogersrx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/25/08
Posts: 712
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Originally Posted By: Gary at Encore
So If you have the space you should at least get a great 7' piano. By the way many people love 7' to 8' pianos better than 9' pianos. In my openion you get all of the great sound and a faster action in a 7' to 7' 4" piano. The actions are faster because you have shorter key sticks with less mass to push up and down.


I couldn't agree with you more; 7-foot + is the way to go, and I don't care if I have to get rid of other furniture to fit it in the room. The dining room table went when my current piano came home. I grew up with a Baldwin 7-foot grand. Then when I was about 20 I bought my own grand, a Weber WG7, which if I recall correctly was Weber built by Young Chang. I sold that when I moved across country and couldn't take it with me. Went a long time without a piano, then bought this piano, the 6'4" Knabe, had it restored and bought a 6-foot 1940's Chickering quarter grand for a "meanwhile" piano. I loved the Chickering... light responsive action, brilliant scale. I gave it to a friend when my Knabe came back.

My beef with my current piano is that the action is too heavy. I really love the sound, though it is not a concert grand. I have thought much about getting another piano. But, I want the next piano to be *THE* piano. So, since I really like the piano I have, and if the concert tech I have reviewing the piano can lighten it up to my preference (and he swears that it will be no problem) then I will probably keep it until I am ready for *THE* piano. My thoughts are to get either: (listed in order of most likely to actually happen)

1. Steinway B - pre-1940 recently rebuilt BY STEINWAY.
2. Steinway D - rebuilt or retired artist piano.
3. Steinway C - Hamburg, rebuilt by Steinway. This would actually
be my first choice, but they are really hard to find.
4. Yamaha C7 - Fairly newish... maybe with Hamburg Steinway
replacement hammers.
5. Yamaha CF/CFIII - Used but in good shape, with Hamburg Steinway
replacement hammers.

If cost were no problem, I'd probably also throw in a Bosendorfer 225 somewhere in that mix, but they are way less common, and I wouldn't buy a used that is in so-so condition, or rebuilt by someone other than Bosendorfer... and a new one, forget it, too rich for my blood, especially when you compare it to a Steinway C


Edited by crogersrx (07/08/10 09:50 AM)
_________________________
Cary Rogers, PharmD
San Francisco, CA
1887 Knabe 6'4" (Rebuilt)

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#1470429 - 07/08/10 11:11 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: crogersrx]
Gary at Encore Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/16/09
Posts: 250
Loc: Dallas, TX
Just for you thoughts.
I know a long time Steinway dealer who told me privately that he would never buy a retired artist grand. The piano would have been moved maybe 200 times. This moving will slowly twist the piano rim and can never be fixed, not even in rebuilding. This is why artist Steinways are retired after a few years of moving around.

Second the romantic idea that the best pianos were designed in the 19th century, as a Steinway, and can never be improved upon is really nonsence.

You play a lot of pianos, open your mind and try out the pianos which builders have kept improving their designs and factories for the last 100 years. There are several. In fact all of the European companies, except Steinway, have made many redesigns over the last 100 years. These redesigns incorporate many sound board, string scale, duplex designs, bridge changes, and many other things wihich improve the sound of the pianos.

Plus now several companies are improving the actions. Your old piano with an action that you do not like is likely because it was designed so many years ago. If you compare the Steinway actions with new modern actions from Petrof, Kawai, Mason and Hamlin and others you will see a great improvement.

I guess in that your education you has been trying to learn how much the world of products has greatly improved by research and development. However many brands of pianos have done no research and development for 100 years.

By the way I'm told by a Kawai executive that Boston grands are----
Steinway had no design engineers to design the Boston grands. So they told Kawai to get old Knabe grands and duplicate their 19th century designs. They did this. So you like the sound of your old Knabe...
try a Boston.


Edited by Gary at Encore (07/08/10 11:16 AM)
_________________________
Bluthner, Steingraeber, Pleyel, Hailun, Kemble, Baldwin, Story and Clark, Pearl River, Ritmuller and others (store owner)www.encore-pianos.com

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#1470440 - 07/08/10 11:34 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Gary at Encore]
sophial Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/05
Posts: 3405
Loc: US
Gary at Encore wrote: "This moving will slowly twist the piano rim and can never be fixed, not even in rebuilding. This is why artist Steinways are retired after a few years of moving around."


Huh? I've never heard this bit about twisting the rim before. Can anyone from the tech end comment ?

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#1470442 - 07/08/10 11:39 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: sophial]
sophial Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/05
Posts: 3405
Loc: US
Gary at Encore also wrote:
"Steinway had no design engineers to design the Boston grands. So they told Kawai to get old Knabe grands and duplicate their 19th century designs. They did this. "

So Bostons are actually 19th century Knabes? Anyone able to confirm this? Kawai Don? Bob Snyder?

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#1470445 - 07/08/10 11:45 AM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Gary at Encore]
Bob Snyder Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/30/08
Posts: 150
Loc: West Coast
Gary at Encore - I need to clarify several of your statements.

First, and with regard to the "long time Steinway dealer" who confided in you that he'd never buy a retired C&A piano... here is the truth of the matter, based on my first hand experience of over 25 years. Retired C&A pianos are among the easiest pianos to sell - both to dealers, and to their subsequent clients. So if this "long time dealer" did indeed share this, he is in the tiny minority.

Second, your implication that Steinway has not made changes and improvements in the past 100 years - I'd simply refer you to our patent list, which is readily available. Major changes have been made in the pinblock, soundboard, and action during that time. Many, many other changes have been made through the years.

Thirdly - your negative comparison of the Steinway action vs Petrof, etc - your view is not at all confirmed in the real world of performance and piano education.

Finally, your comment about Steinway having no design engineers to design Boston grands is not true. Period. And your subsequent comment about Boston pianos being a result of our asking Kawai to copy old Knabe grands is pure nonsense.

If you are confident of the accuracy of what you put forth, then name the "long time Steinway dealer" and also name the Kawai executive. Jordan - your store manager knows that what I say above is true - he is someone who I know. I will send him a copy of this reply to your post. Further, your own background and training is such that I'd hope you would never knowingly put forth something you know not to be true.

Thank you.
_________________________
Bob Snyder
Senior District Manager
Steinway & Sons

rsnyder@steinway.com
www.steinway.com

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#1470490 - 07/08/10 12:53 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Bob Snyder]
Inlanding Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 1632
Loc: Colorado
Sorry Cary - I know this is off-topic from your original post.

Thanks, Bob,
As an avid Steinway owner/player/tuner, I have been studying very carefully Steinway's history over the years.

Thanks for clarifying what I thought was a large amount of misinformation, as I rarely if at all, involve myself in these types of conversations. Many times, they do help to clarify to whom I should and should not make a referral.

Finally, Cary,
Yes...a 9-footer is a joy to play and it is fun to compare and contrast the characteristics among them all. There are, however, a number of shorter pianos that compete in their own way and provide extreme enjoyment.

Glen
_________________________


March piano audio
https://app.box.com/s/evl3yyp1kj52ve8l069u


A Bit of YouTube

PTG Associate Member

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#1470532 - 07/08/10 02:14 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Gary at Encore]
SophieM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 353
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Gary at Encore
Just for you thoughts.
I know a long time Steinway dealer who told me privately that he would never buy a retired artist grand. The piano would have been moved maybe 200 times. This moving will slowly twist the piano rim and can never be fixed, not even in rebuilding. This is why artist Steinways are retired after a few years of moving around.

Second the romantic idea that the best pianos were designed in the 19th century, as a Steinway, and can never be improved upon is really nonsence.

You play a lot of pianos, open your mind and try out the pianos which builders have kept improving their designs and factories for the last 100 years. There are several. In fact all of the European companies, except Steinway, have made many redesigns over the last 100 years. These redesigns incorporate many sound board, string scale, duplex designs, bridge changes, and many other things wihich improve the sound of the pianos.

Plus now several companies are improving the actions. Your old piano with an action that you do not like is likely because it was designed so many years ago. If you compare the Steinway actions with new modern actions from Petrof, Kawai, Mason and Hamlin and others you will see a great improvement.

I guess in that your education you has been trying to learn how much the world of products has greatly improved by research and development. However many brands of pianos have done no research and development for 100 years.

By the way I'm told by a Kawai executive that Boston grands are----
Steinway had no design engineers to design the Boston grands. So they told Kawai to get old Knabe grands and duplicate their 19th century designs. They did this. So you like the sound of your old Knabe...
try a Boston.


ha ha What a load of crap!!! This is halarious! The stupidest thing I read today! ha ha Puleeez!!!

Thanks, Bob Snyder, for clarifying the lies spread by Gary at Encore. You're so diplomatic in your response!!! thumb

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#1470536 - 07/08/10 02:22 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Inlanding]
crogersrx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/25/08
Posts: 712
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Originally Posted By: Inlanding
Sorry Cary - I know this is off-topic from your original post.


Not a problem... these discussions are always interesting and lively!

Originally Posted By: Inlanding
Finally, Cary,
Yes...a 9-footer is a joy to play and it is fun to compare and contrast the characteristics among them all. There are, however, a number of shorter pianos that compete in their own way and provide extreme enjoyment.

Glen


I have the current "heavy action" thing in remedy. My teacher, who is a concert artist, has as his tech the retired tech for the Houston Symphony & Grand Opera. He has already reviewed my piano and said that he basically just needs to finesse and finish the work started by the rebuilder. He said that the hammers that were put on are too heavy for the geometry and he can lighten them and get the weight reduced to the proper ~ 45-50g downweight. The voicing he said will be no problem. He actually rebuilt a piano exactly like mine a couple years ago and said that it turned out wonderful, so he has no doubt that this one will turn out just as well.

I will probably keep this piano for a few more years while I continue saving and trying lots of different instruments. I will undoubtedly get a 7+ foot piano. I've played many 6-foot-somethings that are beautiful, but I want a large piano, so probably a 7'4" - 9-foot is what will end up being my *THE* piano.

I ran accross a Yamaha C7 recently that i really like. I was considering buying it, having the hammers changed to my liking, and sticking with it until I moved to a concert grand, but I'm going to wait until I see how the outcome of my piano turns out in the hands of this tech. He said that he has at least two people who are presently looking for a piano like mine, so if mine doesn't end up being what I want to stick with... should be no problem to sell and switch to the C7 that I recently saw. The owner is in no hurry to get rid of it.
_________________________
Cary Rogers, PharmD
San Francisco, CA
1887 Knabe 6'4" (Rebuilt)

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#1470548 - 07/08/10 02:37 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: crogersrx]
Inlanding Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 1632
Loc: Colorado
You must have a huge space to accommodate a concert grand, Cary! Wow.

In my rotation of customer tunings, in the mix is a Bluthner 4, Yamaha C7, Steinway B, and a Pramberger 208 among others.

The Yamaha is very well prepped and a joy to play. The Bluthner 4...it is a large room piano, no doubt! The B - sweet, bell-like upper register, strong bass, best touchweight of the group, the Pramberger - a good all around instrument. Of course some voicing and regulating adjustments can be made to bring out the best in each, but none can really sound and respond like the others.

Quite interesting, actually. Everyone has their favorites, and for good reason! Who knows, after the master tech does his magic, you might decide to keep that baby afterall.

Look forward to knowing what you decide to do after the dust settles a bit. Keep test-driving, it's lots of fun in the meantime, eh?

Glen
_________________________


March piano audio
https://app.box.com/s/evl3yyp1kj52ve8l069u


A Bit of YouTube

PTG Associate Member

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#1470609 - 07/08/10 04:13 PM Re: Once you've tried a 9-footer.... [Re: Inlanding]
Gary at Encore Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/16/09
Posts: 250
Loc: Dallas, TX
Hello Bob Snyder,
You are doing your job well to try and keep the Steinway promotion and sales myths going.

Steinway had some patents but they are all long expired. You long list of patents are mostly from the 19th century and expired many decades ago. But of course every shopper who goes into a Steinway store gets the sales talk about the long list of Steinway patents.

As to improvements in Steinway pianos-- they also stopped more than 50 years ago. I'm been told many times that the last improvements were in the teflon action bushings of the 1950s This improvement was taken away when critics came along. Steinway could have engineered better bushings but instead went back to the old problem prone bushings. (This lack of leadership by Steinway and criticism of any improvements keeps the piano business in the US very much stuck in the past.)

And then there were the "improvements" in key wood construction of concert grands which any tech knows were only to lower the cost and which made keys too week and flexible. So Steinway went back to the older and stronger key construction.

And I'm suppose to name Kawai people so Steinway can crash down on their heads? And the Steinway dealer, name him and his head will be chopped. Of course any Steinway dealer likes to buy the artist pianos because they are easy to sell to the public. But that does not make my information wrong. Why does Steinway insist that rental pianos must be sold after a few years of life? Of course my information is right but the public must never know this truth.

Many times people have asked Steinway to name the piano designers and piano engineers who "designed the Boston pianos." You of course have never come forth with any names as they never existed.

As to actions. Every Steinway salesperson is taught to call Kawai action parts "plastic" and to tell every customer that they are "Cheap" and "will not last." Of course these are lies and deception. Carbon fibre action parts are not plastic. Bob Snyder, do you play golf with "Plastic" golf clubs or tennis rackets? Of course not, they are not plastic but carbon fibre. Do you get on airplanes with "plastic" wing spars? Of course not, they are carbon fibre composite, just as the space vehicles are made from.

The day that Steinway stops their lies and deceptions and misleading sales and marketing, they will have to build better pianos. Perhaps Samick can show them how to build better pianos. Samick must do research and development which Steinway does not.

Bob, Thanks for your intimidation and great shedding of insightful information. You are defending Steinway in the usual manner.
_________________________
Bluthner, Steingraeber, Pleyel, Hailun, Kemble, Baldwin, Story and Clark, Pearl River, Ritmuller and others (store owner)www.encore-pianos.com

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