Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Topic Options
#1496275 - 08/15/10 04:08 AM Soft pedal
Jophiel Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/07/10
Posts: 49
Hi! I have upright piano and I don´t mostly use this pedal, I think the sound is too soft, sometimes I don´t press it completely, just to the middle, it´s better I think. I can play very quietly without it.
Do you use this pedal often? Is necessary for andvanced pianist to use it?

Top
Ad 800 (Pearl River)
Pearl River World's Best Selling Piano
#1496281 - 08/15/10 04:24 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Jophiel]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
Funny you should ask.....The last couple of nights, I did small performances as part of a movie showing -- and the piano was an upright. I had the exact same issue with the soft pedal, and therefore hardly used it at all, and when I did use it, I only put it down a fraction -- just like what you said.

The soft pedal works differently on uprights than on grands (as you know) but I had never played any other upright where there was this issue. Still, it didn't "throw" me very much because I rarely put the soft pedal down all the way anyway, on any piano.

It's good to get into the habit of just pressing it down part of the way -- especially on grands. Not counting professional pianists, I think most people probably do usually put it down completely whenever they use it. That's a mistake. The main thing that's bad about it is that you hit the strings with the same exact part of the hammers all the time (and the same part where other people hit it too). That part of the hammer then becomes hardened, and so it doesn't give as nice a tone. Also, besides the tone being worse, it is the same tone all the time, while if you press the soft pedal down just a fraction, and if you use different fractions at different times, you use an infinite variety of positions on the hammers, and you have the possibility for different shades of tone. I admit that this is hard to do, and most of us probably can't really, so I wouldn't put a lot of emphasis on it; but the other thing is definitely true.

Is it "necessary" to use it? Not on such a piano. I think I went through one or two of my pieces without using it at all. But with pianos in general, you will be sacrificing a lot if you never use the soft pedal. Don't use me as an example smile but for what it's worth, on most pianos I'm on the soft pedal the majority of the time.

I hope this is helpful.
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1496320 - 08/15/10 06:19 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Jophiel]
ChopinAddict Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/29/09
Posts: 6101
Loc: Land of the never-ending music
The first time I played the Raindrop Prelude I had downloaded a version from the net that had "una corda" for the middle section instead of the usual "sotto voce". I really didn't like it (even without knowing at that time it shouldn't have been there anyway) and just automatically played it "sotto voce". Particularly with repeated notes I think the soft pedal doesn't sound too nice.
_________________________



Music is my best friend.


Top
#1496329 - 08/15/10 06:42 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: ChopinAddict]
SpencerF Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/17/10
Posts: 122
I have an old upright grand and I always press the pedal to the maximum because it moves the hammers closer to the strings and lowers the keys so it makes it much easier to play pianissimo (this is not the case on a grand). Plus it does make the piano a bit quieter and that is a good thing in my household. When i get a digital piano, I doubt I will ever really use the pedal again.

Top
#1496397 - 08/15/10 10:21 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: SpencerF]
Mattardo Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/11/08
Posts: 1306
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over, and can create some problems with how the hammers strike the strings, causing strange wear-and-tear problems in a very uneven fashion on the hammers. This can affect playing without the soft pedal eventually.

Just a little warning - there is a reason some pianists push it down the same way. It depends on the piano.

Top
#1496407 - 08/15/10 10:37 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mattardo]
JustAnotherPianist Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/20/08
Posts: 798
Loc: United Kingdom
Soft pedal is crucial for advanced piano playing. It's important not to overuse it. It's important to use it sometimes at all dynamic levels, not just pp.

It doesn't work on an upright piano, though. If you really want to be a great pianist and you only have an upright to practice on, I would recommend you avoid using the soft pedal. They are that different.

Top
#1496415 - 08/15/10 10:47 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: JustAnotherPianist]
debrucey Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/18/06
Posts: 2606
Loc: Manchester, UK
I've never used it. I've never really learned how.

Top
#1496483 - 08/15/10 12:44 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mattardo]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over



On a grand the una corda ALWAYS shifts the action, which is why an upright doesn't truly have an una corda.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1496486 - 08/15/10 12:48 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: debrucey]
Jophiel Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/07/10
Posts: 49
Thanks for answers smile Do you have some tips where to use it? My teacher always said it, but I don´t have lessons on holiday and I´m learning new pieces, thanks smile
I try to use it when there is pp or ppp...

Top
#1496496 - 08/15/10 01:13 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: debrucey]
JustAnotherPianist Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/20/08
Posts: 798
Loc: United Kingdom
Originally Posted By: debrucey
I've never used it. I've never really learned how.


Well, basically, you put your foot down on the pedal, and then you play....

The only important things to keep in mind are:

while depressing the soft pedal DOES decrease the amount of sound produced overall by the instrument, it's more of a colour thing. It tends to kill the brightness in the sound, so if you want something to be quiet, light, yet brilliant, you should probably acheive this with your fingers, and not with the soft pedal.

It's not to be used as a crutch. It is very easy to slip into the bad habit of using the soft pedal automatically whenever the composer puts p or pp in the score.

Playing f with the soft pedal can be an interesting effect, as well.

Top
#1496502 - 08/15/10 01:27 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: stores]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21522
Loc: Oakland
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over



On a grand the una corda ALWAYS shifts the action, which is why an upright doesn't truly have an una corda.


Well, not always, but most grands shift the action.

No matter how the pedal works, the result is variable. My feeling is that the soft pedal is not very useful.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1496505 - 08/15/10 01:29 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mattardo]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over, and can create some problems with how the hammers strike the strings, causing strange wear-and-tear problems in a very uneven fashion on the hammers.....

Where did you ever hear that?
Unless there's some situation with some grands that I can't imagine, it's the exact opposite.
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1496518 - 08/15/10 01:54 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
Kuanpiano Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/06/10
Posts: 2140
Loc: Canada
It simultaneously shades the tones more as well as decreasing the volume of the sound as you press with various degrees. I find when I hold it down completely, I can make fluttery-arpeggio passages (like in Chopin's 3rd scherzo) sparkle with a great deal of brightness, but still be hushed.

It's extremely useful for just colouring the sound a bit....I rarely hold the thing down fully, but when I want varying degrees of colour, I try pushing it down.

Trust me, several pieces are impossible to play without use of the soft pedal (a big example being Ravel's Une Barque sur l'ocean, because I'm playing it at my exam tomorrow....).
_________________________
Working on:
Chopin - Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise Brillante
Rachmaninoff - Preludes op. 23 nos. 3,4,6, op. 32 no.12
Franck - Violin Sonata

Top
#1496519 - 08/15/10 01:55 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: BDB]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: BDB
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over



On a grand the una corda ALWAYS shifts the action, which is why an upright doesn't truly have an una corda.


Well, not always, but most grands shift the action.

No matter how the pedal works, the result is variable. My feeling is that the soft pedal is not very useful.


How do the "others" work?
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1496521 - 08/15/10 01:57 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Mark_C
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over, and can create some problems with how the hammers strike the strings, causing strange wear-and-tear problems in a very uneven fashion on the hammers.....

Where did you ever hear that?
Unless there's some situation with some grands that I can't imagine, it's the exact opposite.


I wondered the same. You should be able to sit on the thing all day long if it suits you.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1496542 - 08/15/10 02:39 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: stores]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: Mark_C
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over, and can create some problems with how the hammers strike the strings, causing strange wear-and-tear problems in a very uneven fashion on the hammers.....
Where did you ever hear that?
Unless there's some situation with some grands that I can't imagine, it's the exact opposite.

I wondered the same. You should be able to sit on the thing all day long if it suits you.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but even though you're saying you wondered about the same thing I did, it seems like you're actually agreeing with him more than with me!!

He's saying there's a problem if you don't "sit on it" (i.e. if you press it down only some fraction).
I'm saying there's a problem if you do.
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1496571 - 08/15/10 03:35 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Mark_C
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: Mark_C
Originally Posted By: Mattardo
Be careful putting the soft pedal down different lengths on grands - this usually shifts the keys over, and can create some problems with how the hammers strike the strings, causing strange wear-and-tear problems in a very uneven fashion on the hammers.....
Where did you ever hear that?
Unless there's some situation with some grands that I can't imagine, it's the exact opposite.

I wondered the same. You should be able to sit on the thing all day long if it suits you.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but even though you're saying you wondered about the same thing I did, it seems like you're actually agreeing with him more than with me!!

He's saying there's a problem if you don't "sit on it" (i.e. if you press it down only some fraction).
I'm saying there's a problem if you do.


Ah, well, now that I reread his post I can see where you could take him to mean sitting on it to a degree. At any rate, you should still be able to sit on the damned thing (completely) all day long if that's what floats your boat (with no worry that is).
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1496576 - 08/15/10 03:44 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: stores]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
Well, I think you misunderstood my clarification smile probably because of that parenthetical thing I put in there, which bollixed it up.

So, let's forget what I said before. smile
Main thing I'm saying: If you sit on it completely, the exact same part of the hammer hits the string every time. That part of the hammer gets compressed ("grooved"), and hardened -- which affects the tone. If there's some way this wouldn't occur, I can't imagine what it would be.
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1496597 - 08/15/10 04:22 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
Mattardo Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/11/08
Posts: 1306
Good Lord...I thought I was specific enough...
There's usually not a problem if you hold the pedal down the whole way when you use it.
There can be a problem if you half-pedal, or micro-pedal, using the Una Corda.

It's fairly simple once you understand how it works. Your hammer is getting uneven wear from the strings, if you half or micro pedal using the una corda. Sometimes you're hitting just one string, sometimes you're hitting just half a string, etc.
You're also getting uneven wear with holding the una corda down the entire way, but a good tuner can deal with this. The problem arises when there is no consistency on where the wear occurs.

A tuner who has spent some time adjusting how the una corda works can explain it better than me.
Just make sure, if half-pedalling with una corda, etc - to let your tuner know. He can do the checks that tuners do to make sure it will work properly, and occasionally check for wear. Adjustments now can save a lot of grief later down the road with your hammers.


Edited by Mattardo (08/15/10 04:29 PM)

Top
#1496614 - 08/15/10 04:57 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mattardo]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
You were never unclear in the first place.
You were absolutely clear. I just don't see how you can think it gives "uneven wear" when you make the hammer hit the strings at an infinite array of different points, as opposed to the same point all the time.

It's the opposite.
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1496680 - 08/15/10 06:37 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Mark_C
You were never unclear in the first place.
You were absolutely clear. I just don't see how you can think it gives "uneven wear" when you make the hammer hit the strings at an infinite array of different points, as opposed to the same point all the time.

It's the opposite.


Exactly. And I do understand what you're saying about sitting on it, but unless you're sitting on it on a daily basis you're not going to ever experience a problem.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


Top
#1496691 - 08/15/10 06:59 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: stores]
BruceD Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 18021
Loc: Victoria, BC
By the same token, without using the una corda pedal at all the hammers are always contacting the strings at the same point on the hammers, which, eventually, is going to cause compressing (hardening) of the felts at the points of contact.

So, I'm not quite sure I follow the reasoning - or what the reasoning actually is - behind the idea of depressing the una corda all the way or just partially.

Regards,
_________________________
BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190

Top
#1496717 - 08/15/10 07:40 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: BruceD]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: BruceD
By the same token, without using the una corda pedal at all the hammers are always contacting the strings at the same point on the hammers, which, eventually, is going to cause compressing (hardening) of the felts at the points of contact.
So, I'm not quite sure I follow the reasoning - or what the reasoning actually is - behind the idea of depressing the una corda all the way or just partially....

Good question. I was waiting to see if someone would ask. smile

Yes indeed, inevitably you get that kind of wear at the points where the hammers hit the strings on tre corda -- and that's one of the reasons why some pianists are on the soft pedal most of the time. (I almost said "many pianists" but that would be inviting trouble.)

As I said earlier, I'm on the soft pedal the majority of the time.
That's exactly why. (Or I should say, the main reason why; there's also the thing of being able potentially to get a whole array of tone qualities according to exactly how much you put it down, but that's more controversial because it depends on a higher level of skill than most of us probably have, so let's forget that for the moment.)

It is often said that the soft pedal is a voicing tool as much as or more than a softening tool. And depending on how you use it, it absolutely is.

Anyway....with tre corda, you have no choice but to be using points of the hammer that are more compressed ("grooved") than the rest of the hammer, which (arguably) compromises the quality of the tone. With una corda, you don't suffer that, provided you put it down in differing degrees.

The only way around this that I know of is getting the hammers replaced or having them filed or voiced much more frequently than anyone ever does.

P.S. The issue has some different wrinkles if we're talking about one's own piano or a "public" piano, but the principles are the same.


Edited by Mark_C (08/15/10 07:53 PM)
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1496802 - 08/15/10 10:24 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
Mattardo Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/11/08
Posts: 1306
Like I said - I can't explain this as well as a tuner. I would be interested to see what responses a thread in the tuner's section would get.

Tuners usually spend time undoing the damage done by constantly striking the same point. They are usually very detailed in how they soften the hammers (or harden, though this is rare for classical performers, I would think) and they know exactly what point on the hammer they are focusing on. They don't just start pricking at random on the hammer - it does no good to waste time or 'hammer-life' by working on the entire hammer indiscriminately: the attention paid is usually very detailed and designed to fix very specific issues.

So constantly striking the same point is not bad at all when your technician is spending occasional time fixing this issue. The problem is when the strike points are all over the place - the tuner has no real way of counterbalancing this unless he literally focuses on every conceivable strike point on the hammer every time he services the hammers. This is a waste of time, and messes up the work that needs to be done on the regular strike points.

Like I said - are there any tuners out there lol? I have had several tuners explain this to me, and I have read it in several reference works on piano playing. I cannot think of them, at the moment - sorry.

I use the soft pedal to introduce color as needed, and I use half and micro pedalling. BUT I let my tuner know that I do so, so he can voice the hammers properly. It helps when they know exactly why certain issues are cropping up on the hammers.

Top
#1496912 - 08/16/10 05:41 AM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mattardo]
SpencerF Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/17/10
Posts: 122
I understand what Mark C. is saying (and my intuition agrees with that) and I understand what Mattardo is trying to say, but like Mark C., I don't understand what the tuner is *actually* doing that makes uneven pedaling a problem. I hope someone can clear this up, I am very interested to hear.

Top
#1497146 - 08/16/10 02:14 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: SpencerF]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19776
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: SpencerF
I understand what Mark C. is saying (and my intuition agrees with that) and I understand what Mattardo is trying to say, but like Mark C., I don't understand what the tuner is *actually* doing that makes uneven pedaling a problem. I hope someone can clear this up, I am very interested to hear.

I think I understood what he meant even though I'm 'on the other side.'

He's saying that if the hammers hit the strings in the same spots all the time, the hammers get "grooved" only in those specific places, rather than worn all over, and that it's no problem for the tuner to take care of those spots (not when he tunes, but when he "voices" the piano).

While I understand what he means, I don't agree that it's an answer, for a couple of reasons:

-- Voicing doesn't generally fully take care of those "grooves." It's a temporary fix, and I would think that usually, before long you'd have those grooves again, well before you would consider having the piano voiced again. Especially if you play a lot and if you have any kind of decent forte smile those points on the hammer have simply been 'damaged' a bit. (Maybe damaged is too strong a word but I can't come up with another one.) The analogy that occurs to me is that it's like a sprain that heals. Fractures usually heal fully and are basically 'good as new,' but sprains always remain a bit weakened and vulnerable.

-- He implies that it's harder or impossible for the tuner ("voicer") to take care of the whole hammer. I don't think it is; or even if it is, just minimally. It might make the voicing job take a bit longer -- but I don't think it even would, among other reasons because deeper grooves require more work than less-deep grooves, and I think fairly even wear across the hammer is actually easiest of all to take care of. In other words, just the opposite of what he implied.

Piano techs could definitely help us out here. smile
_________________________
"Everything I say is my opinion, including the facts." :-)

Top
#1497167 - 08/16/10 02:39 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mark_C]
Mattardo Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/11/08
Posts: 1306
Definately, the techs could help us.
To clarify, it's the non-specificity of the una-corda grooves (and they are not really grooves in this example) that make a problem. When a tuner knows where a constant groove is (as from normal play), it's much easier to deal with.

Where's the techs when we need them? Oh well... I know how I have been having my piano serviced all these years heh heh!

Top
#1497171 - 08/16/10 02:45 PM Re: Soft pedal [Re: Mattardo]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21522
Loc: Oakland
During voicing, we file the hammers to remove the grooves. This is one of the reasons why the soft pedal is variable.

Some manufacturers specify that the action should shift enough so that the hammers in the treble hit only two strings. Some specify a shift less than that. Some leave it up to the technician. If it hits two strings, it will make a difference whether it moves the action far enough so that the strings are struck where the grooves are from the tre corda position or not.

In short, you cannot count on the soft pedal working uniformly from piano to piano.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top

Moderator:  Brendan, Kreisler 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
How Much Are Piano Lessons Usually
by Korsario
17 minutes 23 seconds ago
temperament setting in Casio PX-850
by Doritos Flavoured
40 minutes 27 seconds ago
VI Labs True Keys: From ilok to Hard Drive Activation
by imyself
Today at 10:46 AM
A REALLY Indirect Blow Action
by Steve Cohen
Today at 09:01 AM
Bone chilling ending to pieces
by lacrymosa85
Today at 08:44 AM
Who's Online
147 registered (ajames, 255, accordeur, 3times2, 39 invisible), 1497 Guests and 21 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76237 Members
42 Forums
157603 Topics
2314999 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission