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#1215576 - 06/11/09 12:33 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Numerian]
Damon Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/22/06
Posts: 5914
Loc: St. Louis area
Originally Posted By: Numerian
Who knows, they may wind up one day deciding winners by public vote like American Idol. I wouldn't be surprised if at least one of them tries it.


At least you could stop worrying about how many times you'll hear the Bm Sonata. But start worrying about how many times you'll hear Fur Elise, the Ab Polonaise, and the 2nd Hungarian Rhapsody. laugh
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#1215583 - 06/11/09 01:38 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Damon]
newport Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/05
Posts: 492
Where does one graduate to after the Bm Sonata? smile
_________________________
Chopin Op.51
John

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#1215599 - 06/11/09 03:24 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: newport]
izaldu Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/18/08
Posts: 1248
Loc:
Wow, took a while to catch up with this thread ... i 've been watching the main guys on youtube and still can't believe Vacatello didn't win.

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#1215633 - 06/11/09 06:30 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Ridicolosamente]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7424
Originally Posted By: Ridicolosamente
Quite a bitter article. While I agree with most of it, and am also disappointed with the results, I believe he crosses the line when he opines that Tsujii "[and other soloists] who cannot see a conductor's cues should not be playing concertos in public." Unnecessarily malicious in my opinion.



It may be uncomfortable to read, but to me it seems more like a pragmatic assessment, rather than malicious in spirit. After all, Tsujii has said he gets cues from the conductor's breathing, and I'm sorry but that just doesn't cut it for professional work, no matter how virtuosic a breather the conductor might be. As far as I know, from their own point of view, conductors work pretty much exclusively through visual cues, which logically means they are going to have a nearly total disconnect with a blind performer.

On the other hand, there is a subset of concertos that don't necessarily require finely graded communication between conductor and soloist (mostly from the Classical era but including some later ones), so I think it is a feasible proposition to be working with sight-impaired instrumentalists, but only within a pretty severely limited range of works.

There's been a bit of discussion here about how much difference, in terms of difficulty, it makes to play the piano without sight. I personally think it's been wildly over-estimated, and sentimentalized much more than necessary. It just dawned on me - where are all the blind classical violinists and wind players, were the (purported) need for vision as an aid to placing the finger is basically nonexistant?

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#1215641 - 06/11/09 07:16 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: wr]
Phlebas Offline


Registered: 01/02/03
Posts: 4654
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: wr
After all, Tsujii has said he gets cues from the conductor's breathing, and I'm sorry but that just doesn't cut it for professional work, no matter how virtuosic a breather the conductor might be.


I guess that begs the question. Were there more ensemble issues with his playing vs other performances? I didn't see any of the concerto performances or chamber music.

Also, everything being equal, if Tsujii (or another blind pianist) is a true artist, does it not make sense for conductors and other collaborators with him to think creatively about how to manage ensemble work with a blind performer?

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#1215652 - 06/11/09 08:08 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Phlebas]
Kreisler Offline



Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13706
Loc: Iowa City, IA
No. The ensemble issues are completely invented. There are plenty of pianists who never look at conductors or chamber musicians while playing. Breathing works fine, and most of the time in a concerto situation, you pay more attention to the concertmaster anyway.

The only major ensemble problem in Tsujii's performances was the opening of the Rachmaninoff, and that was not a sight issue.

The whole breathing/watching the conductor issue is invented by people who have never played an orchestra or string quartet. Sight is a lot less important in good ensemble playing than people think it is.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

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#1215654 - 06/11/09 08:13 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Axtremus]
yhc Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/31/04
Posts: 148
Loc: NYC, NY
Originally Posted By: Axtremus
Replacing the Van Cliburn jury ...

Let's use a market based pricing mechanism.

Set up a futures market with derivatives backed by future revenues of the recordings of the pianists' performances in the Van Cliburn competition.

The pianist whose recordings' futures got priced the highest in the open market at the end of the competition wins. :p


Fully agreed, plus let's wait for 10, 15, 20 years before we truly judge them. Could you remember the past Cliburn Champions 4, 8, 12 years ago? How do they fare in general publics' view now?

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#1215683 - 06/11/09 09:42 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Kreisler]
Arghhh Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/31/08
Posts: 1025
Originally Posted By: Kreisler

The whole breathing/watching the conductor issue is invented by people who have never played an orchestra or string quartet. Sight is a lot less important in good ensemble playing than people think it is.


In the Clavier October 2007 issue, there was an interview with Jean Barr (collaborative piano professor at Eastman) she says one of the things she does with her students, like a piano/clarinet duo, is to have them play facing away from each other. This forces them to listen to each other and the result is they actually play together better than when they are trying to look at each other. Tsujii must be an expert in this area, since he relies on his hearing for a lot more than a sighted person does.

There may be a few issues getting cues from a conductor, but these would be minimal, and I'm inclined to agree with Phlebas that solutions for these places could be found.

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#1215693 - 06/11/09 10:11 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Arghhh]
Auntie Lynn Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/07/04
Posts: 1096
Loc: San Francisco, CA
Here's the review by Benjamin Ivry - don't know if it will take, but here goes:

WHAT WAS THE JURY THINKING? By BENJAMIN IVRY

In the murky, labyrinthine world of music competitions, efforts at transparency can leave listeners disconcerted and even flummoxed. Such is the conclusion sparked by the results,
announced June 7, of the 13th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in Fort
Worth, Texas.

This year, for the first time, all performances in the quadrennial 17-day contest were transmitted live via Webcasts, and later archived online at www.cliburn.tv. Selected
rehearsals were also shown live, although not archived for later viewing. In 1966, the Cliburn competition jury got it right when it awarded a gold medal to the great Romanian pianist Radu Lupu. Since then, the competition has more often resulted in odd picks, such as the provincial-sounding Olga Kern and plodding Alexander Kobrin, Cliburn gold medalists in 2001 and 2005, respectively. Yet nothing in recent memory has been as shocking as this year's top prizes, which ignored the most musically mature and sensitive
pianist competing in the finals, Chinese-born Di Wu, but gave gold medals to Nobuyuki Tsujii, a student-level Japanese performer plainly out of his depth in the most demanding
repertoire, and Haochen Zhang, a clearly talented but unfinished musician who just turned 19. Second prize went to Yeol Eum Son, a bland South Korean pianist, and no third prize was awarded.

Many articles have focused on the fact that Mr. Tsujii was born blind and learns music by ear. But only results count, and his June 6 performance of Rachmaninoff's Second Piano Concerto with the mediocre Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, led with steely resolve by James Conlon, was a disaster. Soloists who cannot see a conductor's cues should not be playing concertos in public, out of simple respect for the compose rs involved. Promoters can easily turn musical performances into stunts, like the staged operahouse appearances of the otherwise cannily intelligent tenor Andrea Bocelli.

Mr. Tsujii was highly uneven even in solo music, such as a jejune version of Beethoven's "Appassionata" Sonata on June 7, yet the jury, which included the distinguished pianists Menahem Pressler and Joseph Kalichstein, as well as the famed Juilliard piano teacher Yoheved Kaplinsky, awarded him first place. Also on the jury of eleven were pianists not known for unfailing taste in their own performances -- Russia's Dmitri Alexeev, China's
Hung-Kuan Chen, and France's Michel Béroff -- as well as such less-than-stellar conductors as Italy's Marcello Abbado, Poland's Tadeusz Strugala, and the jury's chairman, John Giordano, who leads the aforementioned dispiriting Fort Worth Symphony. Yet the jury's composition hardly explains its errors, which are all too evident if we watch the archived performances on the Web.

Texas boasts a number of accomplished orchestras, so why not give the Fort Worth ensemble a rest for the next competition and instead invite the world-class Norwegian maestro Per Brevig's nearby East Texas Symphony or the Dutchman Jaap van Zweden's
Dallas Symphony as house orchestra in the spirit of healthy competition? Likewise, requiring all contestants to perform chamber music with the brash, imprecise Takács Quartet from Hungary did precious few favors this year to listeners or the art form of the piano quintet.

If standard accompaniment was so rough, can we be surprised that Bulgaria's Evgeni Bozhanov, a flashy, showily brutal performer, reached the finals, while Israel's Ran Dank, a far better musician who in a May 30 semifinal performance offered up stylistically astute versions of Bach Partita No. 4 in D major and Prokofiev's kaleidoscopic 6th Sonata, was eliminated by the final round? Mr. Dank's compatriot, the Ukraine-born Israeli Victor Stanislavsky, was given even shorter shrift by the jury, eliminated after the preliminary rounds despite an agile, emotionally engaging May 25 recital of music by Scarlatti,
Mozart, Schumann and Ligeti.

Watching real talents fall by the wayside in such competitions (Australia's Andrea Lam, another example, was stopped in the semifinals) is part of what happens when musicmaking is turned into a public contest for career-advancement. Yet when the
performances are put online for all to see, noting such mishaps is no longer mere second-guessing; if the jury has missed opportunities to praise the worthy, doing so becomes the duty of anyone who cares about the music being played. As if systematically, those performers with the most insight into the composers they played were accorded the least advancement by this year's Cliburn jury. How else can we explain Ms. Wu's deeply
poetic renditions of Ravel's "Miroirs" (on May 23) and "Gaspard de la Nuit" (June 6) being overlooked?

Intensely choreographic in conception, these Ravel works were turned into miniballets by Ms. Wu, who combined assured, contained strength with high drama. By comparison, a version of the same "Gaspard de la Nuit" by Mr. Zhang, the gold-medal winner, on June 6 was excessively abstract, however ably executed. Characteristically, Mr. Zhang made his finest impression on June 7, the competition's final afternoon, by playing Prokofiev's percussively machine-like Second Concerto, while Ms. Wu majestically embraced the passionate Rachmaninoff Third Concerto, to no apparent avail.

Of course, gifted young musicians who expose themselves to the harrowing experience of competitions realize what they are getting into. The frenzy for attention in an ever-narrowing market can be overwhelming, and the results even more cataclysmic today than in a music economy where talent naturally rose to the top. For example, because no third prize was awarded by the Cliburn jury, Ms. Wu, 24, was not given the opportunity to
record a CD sponsored by the competition. Yet visitors to Ms. Wu's own Web site (www.diwupiano.com) can already purchase a privately made CD of her playing Debussy, Liszt and Brahms with dazzling mastery.

One wonders if Mr. Cliburn, now 74, would have done any better had he, by some miraculous time shift, entered his own competition as it is today, in the guise of his younger self. He might have been excluded from this competition before the semifinals rolled around. A real talent, whose early recordings of Chopin's Sonatas are still admirable, Mr. Cliburn weakened as time went by and his career more or less faded out. May those real talents who are underestimated by the latest Cliburn Competition prove to be made of stronger, more artistically durable stuff than Mr. Cliburn.

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#1215741 - 06/11/09 11:33 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Auntie Lynn]
signa Offline
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/04
Posts: 8482
Loc: Ohio, USA
this was the article we're talking about, as the link was posted earlier.

as to Tsujii case, there's one solution however, i would think, that some day he'd just conduct and play piano himself for a concerto performace, like Uchida does. that would take away the need for him to get cue from a conductor. but it may restrict him playing certain Romantic concerti, while it would work well for Mozart or Beethoven.

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#1215869 - 06/11/09 02:53 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: signa]
Kreisler Offline



Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13706
Loc: Iowa City, IA
Some of this reminds me of criticisms made of Evelyn Glennie. (For those who don't know, she's a percussion virtuoso who is profoundly deaf.) Here's her answer to her critics:

http://www.evelyn.co.uk/live/hearing_essay.htm
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

www.pianoped.com
www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed

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#1215999 - 06/11/09 07:31 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Kreisler]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7424
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
No. The ensemble issues are completely invented. There are plenty of pianists who never look at conductors or chamber musicians while playing. Breathing works fine, and most of the time in a concerto situation, you pay more attention to the concertmaster anyway.

The only major ensemble problem in Tsujii's performances was the opening of the Rachmaninoff, and that was not a sight issue.

The whole breathing/watching the conductor issue is invented by people who have never played an orchestra or string quartet. Sight is a lot less important in good ensemble playing than people think it is.


I have both played a concerto with an orchestra and done chamber music, so at least for me, thinking about the ensemble issues are not simply invented from nothing, but have some basis in experience. Not a lot of experience and not very recent, it's true, but still, not invented out of thin air.

No, you don't need to spend a lot of time looking directly at the conductor when doing a concerto (how much depends on the concerto), but you do have peripheral vision that is feeding you the info about what the conductor is doing. And whether you can see the concertmaster at all depends on the placement of the piano and the concertmaster. I think in many performances there's no possibility for visual communication with that chair in the orchestra. But why communicate with them anyway, since they aren't conducting? They don't even play continuously.

Breathing might work fine to get things started, if the conductor is noisy enough about it, but it doesn't work for tempo fluctuations while playing, which may not be accompanied by any change in breathing at all. In my memories of playing chamber, it was often a bending forward motion or nod of the head on the part of the first violin (or whoever had the first notes) which was the cue to begin, and again, tempo fluctuations while playing is in progress aren't necessarily coordinated with breathing cues.

Obviously, though, it's possible in a literal sense to actually get through a concerto with a soloist who doesn't see the conductor, but I don't think it makes for good collaborative music-making in many works. Too many subtleties are lost. But I imagine that as Tsujii gains more experience with working with others, he and his people will find the best ways to give conductors foreknowledge of how to work with him, to get things to go as well as possible. I wish him and his collaborators luck.

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#1216058 - 06/11/09 09:50 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: yhc]
Axtremus Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/29/03
Posts: 6150
Originally Posted By: yhc
... plus let's wait for 10, 15, 20 years before we truly judge them. Could you remember the past Cliburn Champions 4, 8, 12 years ago? How do they fare in general publics' view now?
Well, if we wait that long to gauge the general public's view, then there's no doubt that Susan Boyle should have won the 2001 Van Cliburn gold medal. laugh
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#1216135 - 06/12/09 01:41 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Axtremus]
newport Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/05
Posts: 492
More information about Haochen (many things I didn't know about):

http://sywanghappy.spaces.live.com/?_c11_BlogPart_BlogPart=blogview&_c=BlogPart

His first orchestral performance followed at 6 when he played Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major K. 467 with the Shanghai symphony.

No wonder he played the No. 20 so well! smile
_________________________
Chopin Op.51
John

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#1216430 - 06/12/09 02:13 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: newport]
signa Offline
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/04
Posts: 8482
Loc: Ohio, USA
here is another article about the result, but with more of understanding towards the result than anything else:

http://www.publicradio.org/columns/perfo...p.shtml?refid=0

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#1216449 - 06/12/09 02:41 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: signa]
newport Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/05
Posts: 492
Any kind of press coverage is good. We should thank Mr Ivory for hie effort, I am sure he only wanted to 'help'! smile
_________________________
Chopin Op.51
John

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#1216450 - 06/12/09 02:41 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: signa]
Ridicolosamente Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/08/08
Posts: 1448
Loc: Miami, Florida, USA
While I don't agree with it all, I like this paragraph from his review.

Originally Posted By: Greg Allen
So... The awards have been announced, and the jury has pretty much validated my educated guess as to the medalists, notwithstanding the first-place tie. To them is due all possible gratitude, for their expertise, professionalism and stamina. I personally think they got it right, insofar as Cliburn winners have always been the pianists who play a broad range of repertoire accurately, tastefully, and consistently, with just the right degree of imagination and dignified showmanship - just like Van himself. (To those who look at this tendency with disdain, who see boring propriety trumping unconventional individuality over and over, I say - you're not entirely wrong. Lang Lang would never win this competition...) In this case we had Bozhanov, who seemed to fit the mold and was well positioned to win a medal, until his idiosyncrasies went berserk. Vacatello might have been a prime candidate if not for inconsistencies that, unfortunately, may have been beyond her control. Wu, with all her audience appeal, was lucky just to make the finals. (My opinion, of course.) Several of the others who didn't, like Kunz, Lifits, Deljavan, Lam, Myer et al, showed distinctive personalities as well as respectable integrity. Ultimately, though, it is these three medalists who are best suited to represent the ideals of the Cliburn Competition. In the real world, for better or worse, ya gotta have a hook, a defining image, and each of them has one. The diminutive Samurai warrior, triumphant over adversity. The shy youth, guileless, humble and wise. The serene diva, draped in radiant robes. These things can help a career, and shouldn't be completely discounted, but of course they're ultimately peripheral to the qualities of outstanding pianism and musicianship that really speak to us. I'm thinking that all three of them have an abundance of these assets, and that we'll be hearing from them a lot in the future.


Funny that he says "Lang Lang would never win this competition." Just sayin... smile

Daniel
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#1216457 - 06/12/09 03:07 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Ridicolosamente]
signa Offline
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/04
Posts: 8482
Loc: Ohio, USA
and he said, 'the winners' of the Cliburn have been just like Van himself...

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#1216472 - 06/12/09 03:44 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: signa]
LisztAddict Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/12/05
Posts: 2895
Loc: Florida
From two other writers "Blind Pianist Nobuyuki Tsuji Blazes a New Path in Classical Music"

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204482304574220150779764622.html


Edited by LisztAddict (06/12/09 03:46 PM)

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#1216479 - 06/12/09 03:50 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: LisztAddict]
Ralph Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/09/01
Posts: 1293
Loc: Delaware (slower/lower)
In order to have a truely "fair" competition, wouldn't it be better to require all the contestants to play the same pieces?
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#1216482 - 06/12/09 03:58 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: LisztAddict]
Ridicolosamente Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/08/08
Posts: 1448
Loc: Miami, Florida, USA
Originally Posted By: LisztAddict
From two other writers "Blind Pianist Nobuyuki Tsuji Blazes a New Path in Classical Music"

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204482304574220150779764622.html


"Some evidence suggests a correlation between blindness and musicality. In the general population, absolute pitch is rare, a skill one in 1,000 or perhaps one in 10,000 has, says Oliver Sacks, a professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, whose book “Musicophilia” explores the relationship between music and the brain. In those born blind, he says, it is one in two or one in three."

Interesting.
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#1216570 - 06/12/09 08:26 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: signa]
newport Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/05
Posts: 492
Originally Posted By: signa
here is another article about the result, but with more of understanding towards the result than anything else:

http://www.publicradio.org/columns/perfo...p.shtml?refid=0


Thanks! My faith is restored after reading through professor Gregory Allen's commentaries.

There is a saying in Chinese "天地有正氣“ : permeating heaven and earth, there is something called Justice.
_________________________
Chopin Op.51
John

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#1216588 - 06/12/09 09:33 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: newport]
newport Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/05
Posts: 492
I found this reverse agism most alarming in so many Cliburn blog commentators, the notion that you are automatically "finished" once you pass the age of 19.
_________________________
Chopin Op.51
John

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#1216589 - 06/12/09 09:33 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: newport]
signa Offline
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/04
Posts: 8482
Loc: Ohio, USA

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#1216609 - 06/12/09 10:12 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: signa]
Theowne Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/06
Posts: 1099
Loc: Toronto, Canada
Originally Posted By: signa


What has this guy been smoking? Tsujii isn't "mentally handicapped".
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音楽は楽しいですね。。。

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#1216620 - 06/12/09 10:29 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Theowne]
Arghhh Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/31/08
Posts: 1025
Originally Posted By: Theowne
Originally Posted By: signa


What has this guy been smoking? Tsujii isn't "mentally handicapped".


Wonder where he got that from? Besides, what is a technology reporter doing writing an article about a music competition?


Edited by Arghhh (06/12/09 10:34 PM)

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#1216629 - 06/12/09 10:53 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Arghhh]
Theowne Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/06
Posts: 1099
Loc: Toronto, Canada
I don't know, but if the amount of research that went into this article is what goes into his tech-related work, it can't be much better.


Edited by Theowne (06/12/09 10:53 PM)
_________________________
http://www.youtube.com/user/Theowne- Piano Videos (Ravel, Debussy, etc) & Original Compositions
音楽は楽しいですね。。。

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#1216673 - 06/13/09 01:19 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Theowne]
pno Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/27/05
Posts: 1042
Loc: ♪oron♪o, on♪ario, canada...
Nowadays it seems everyone and his dog can be an art critic.
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#1216763 - 06/13/09 11:38 AM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: pno]
Axtremus Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/29/03
Posts: 6150
Originally Posted By: pno
Nowadays it seems everyone and his dog can be an art critic.
If one and his dog can criticize highly complex decisions on Trillion dollar war on terror and Trillion dollar financial system bailout and Trillion dollar healthcare reform bills... surely the same one and his same dog can criticize the simple matter of piano competition, or any given piece of art, for that matter. wink
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#1216829 - 06/13/09 02:01 PM Re: 2009 Van Cliburn Competition Megathread [Re: Axtremus]
pno Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/27/05
Posts: 1042
Loc: ♪oron♪o, on♪ario, canada...
Originally Posted By: Axtremus
Originally Posted By: pno
Nowadays it seems everyone and his dog can be an art critic.
If one and his dog can criticize highly complex decisions on Trillion dollar war on terror and Trillion dollar financial system bailout and Trillion dollar healthcare reform bills... surely the same one and his same dog can criticize the simple matter of piano competition, or any given piece of art, for that matter. wink


He certain "can" in the sense that everyone has freedom to say anything. But I am talking the other "can". There is a reason certain credential/skill is required to do certain work. Owning a column doesn't make one automatically a critic of everything.
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New Topics - Multiple Forums
Spinoff: What do we think of "technique seminars"?
by TwoSnowflakes
04/18/14 02:46 PM
Questions about Chopin Nocturne Op. 27 No. 2 in D Flat Minor
by noobpianist90
04/18/14 01:51 PM
A new performance experience... Need advice.
by Svenno
04/18/14 01:46 PM
Thoughts on the Yamaha P-255
by voxpops
04/18/14 01:17 PM
Piano Learning Myths...
by evamar
04/18/14 12:32 PM
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