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#1654700 - 04/04/11 10:51 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
Kreisler Offline



Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13763
Loc: Iowa City, IA
Originally Posted By: TylerNB
I am afraid I will not get a job in that field.


Having a job in the arts is more about what kind of job you want and how enterprising you are than where you went to school.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

www.pianoped.com
www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed

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#1654707 - 04/04/11 10:56 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
TylerNB Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/21/10
Posts: 301
Loc: U.S.A.
This is true. I practice a lot, but I am in in the ninth grade, and I just started piano last year. Even with a big passion, can I make it into Juilliard or another good music college with that kind of experience?
_________________________
Currently Working On:
Chopin Waltz in B Minor (Finished)
Rondo Alla Turca - Mozart (Finished)
Coming up:
Phantom of the Opera?
Certainly more Chopin(Valses and Mazurkas, maybe even a Prelude)
And yet another Bach piece

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#1654712 - 04/04/11 11:12 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
pianojerome Offline
9000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/01/05
Posts: 9868
It depends on what kind of experience you make for yourself over the next four years. You could really improve a ton with the right kind of practice and passion, and it sounds like you've got the passion. I'd say go for it - why not? Most people at Juilliard have been playing for many more years, but ultimately it's the skill that matters, not the number of years. And whether you get in or not, or even audition, why not try to be the best that you can be anyway?

I really empathize with you, because I started piano in 6th grade and also had dreams to be a major concert pianist, even though I was relatively late to the game. I certainly had a ton of passion and practiced a lot. I decided in the end not to audition for Juilliard (because I didn't have the right repertoire yet), but ended up going to the University of Michigan instead and got a terrific education. The faculty there is amazing.

Now I'm getting ready for a PhD in musicology, which in the end actually suits me much more than being a concert pianist. I love it and am already making a name for myself. Kreisler's right in that the music business is really a huge field, and there's soooo much you can do with it. When I was in high school, I thought being a concert pianist was the only option, but the experience of being in music school and pursuing my own projects really opened my eyes up to so many new possibilities.

But go for Juilliard to be a concert pianist, if that's what you want - again, what matters is the experience you make for yourself over the next four years, not the fact that you started last year!
_________________________
Sam

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#1654752 - 04/05/11 12:38 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
BruceD Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 17835
Loc: Victoria, BC
Originally Posted By: TylerNB
This is true. I practice a lot, but I am in in the ninth grade, and I just started piano last year. Even with a big passion, can I make it into Juilliard or another good music college with that kind of experience?


What kind of experience? You have to get some kind of experience before talking about having "that kind" of experience.
_________________________
BruceD
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Estonia 190

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#1654763 - 04/05/11 01:31 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
Lingyis Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/15/09
Posts: 786
Loc: New York, NY
As much as I'd like to de-emphasize technique, it's probably about the only thing that's objective and easy to evaluate.

I'm saying this because I went to a concert in which a recent Juilliard grad performed the Rach 2. Technically, I think she hit the vast majority of the notes (except for notably missing a note in the 3rd chord of the piece). But she ignored the orchestra. Aside from almost always coming in early, at one point in the 3rd movement, she must have been about 2 beats ahead of the orchestra, for about 1 minute (!!) as the conductor kept signalling her, and since I sat in first row, I heard him counting out the beat for her... but she was in her own little world. The conductor was very frustrusted and ended up shaking his head...

And her phrasing was... monotonous to put it nicely.

Without a doubt, many of us here on pianoworld can play better than she does (with practice). So I thought, if she could get in, it's probably mostly because of her technique, less so her musicianship.

I suppose it says something about how musicianship is supposed to improved with age if Juilliard was willing to take a chance on her.

On the other hand, 2 teachers I've talked to have mentioned how the quality of piano students, including Juilliard, has been steadily going downhill in the past two decades. So maybe those who got into Juilliard in the 2000s won't get in in the 1960s.

So I guess I'm trying to say that, if you work hard, you do have a chance! In the 1960s, I suppose if you're still working on Fur Elise now, there's none. Today, if you get your technique up, and play more musically than most, you might be that lucky 5% or so.

I wish I have more data points. I know a couple string students at Juilliard and while one of them is top-notch, I'm surprised by the very poor sightreading skill of the other. Don't know any pianists though.

And by the way the top-notch one is thinking of transferring out to a non-conservatory or doing a joint-program. Looks like this person is also top-notch enough to realize the realities of the world.
_________________________
Working on:
911, 110, 53. Listed in order of time of composition.


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#1654819 - 04/05/11 04:13 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Kreisler]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
Originally Posted By: TylerNB
I am afraid I will not get a job in that field.


Having a job in the arts is more about what kind of job you want and how enterprising you are than where you went to school.


+1
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


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#1654898 - 04/05/11 08:11 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
TylerNB Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/21/10
Posts: 301
Loc: U.S.A.
When I refer to experience, I mean musical experience. You experience new things in music a lot of the time and you usually learn from them, no?
_________________________
Currently Working On:
Chopin Waltz in B Minor (Finished)
Rondo Alla Turca - Mozart (Finished)
Coming up:
Phantom of the Opera?
Certainly more Chopin(Valses and Mazurkas, maybe even a Prelude)
And yet another Bach piece

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#1654900 - 04/05/11 08:13 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: TylerNB
When I refer to experience, I mean musical experience. You experience new things in music a lot of the time and you usually learn from them, no?


I'm sure Bruce fully understands. What he's asking is WHAT experience (do you have?) and the answer is relatively none. Thus his statement that "You have to get some kind of experience before talking about having "that kind" of experience."
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


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#1654945 - 04/05/11 09:29 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Lingyis]
lauralei Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 119
Loc: New England
Originally Posted By: Lingyis

And by the way the top-notch one is thinking of transferring out to a non-conservatory or doing a joint-program. Looks like this person is also top-notch enough to realize the realities of the world.



My 16-year-old son dreams of going to a conservatory when he graduates from high school. His violin teacher supports this idea, but his youth orchestra conductor no longer advises his students to do this because of the lack of job opportunities for classical musicians today. I am unsure what to tell my son. I'm inclined to tell him to follow his passion. I reason that, if necessary, he can always give violin lessons.

On the other hand, we also know a young woman who just graduated from college with a degree in music who is already going back to school to become a nurse. It's very discouraging, but I hate for my son to give up on his dreams. I hope that Kreisler is right and that having a job in the arts is more about how enterprising you are.

Laura

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#1655005 - 04/05/11 11:28 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: lauralei]
pianojerome Offline
9000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/01/05
Posts: 9868
Originally Posted By: lauralei
Originally Posted By: Lingyis

And by the way the top-notch one is thinking of transferring out to a non-conservatory or doing a joint-program. Looks like this person is also top-notch enough to realize the realities of the world.



My 16-year-old son dreams of going to a conservatory when he graduates from high school. His violin teacher supports this idea, but his youth orchestra conductor no longer advises his students to do this because of the lack of job opportunities for classical musicians today


A few months ago, I interviewed for admission to a PhD program in musicology. The first question they asked me (and every other applicant) was: "Given the huge emotional commitment, financial commitment, and educational commitment of pursuing a PhD in music, and given the strong likelihood that, in the end, it might not even get you a job, why would you possibly want to do this to yourself?" It's a hard question!

But as long as communities such as our exist - as long as a Evgeny Kissin can still sell-out Carnegie Hall and come back for 10 curtain calls - there will be jobs for classical musicians. There may not be jobs for all classical musicians, but there will be jobs and demand for some, and that's justification enough for someone who's incredibly passionate about music to pursue this career. Many people never find their passion - they sit in a cubicle, as the cliché goes, and count the minutes until the day is over. To have found a job that you really love doing is such a blessing, that it would seem almost foolish to throw it away in exchange for something boring but lucrative, wouldn't it?
_________________________
Sam

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#1655035 - 04/05/11 12:16 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: pianojerome]
Lingyis Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/15/09
Posts: 786
Loc: New York, NY
Originally Posted By: pianojerome

To have found a job that you really love doing is such a blessing, that it would seem almost foolish to throw it away in exchange for something boring but lucrative, wouldn't it?


Yeah, but what if even the musical job in the end isn't something you love doing? There's no guarantee.
_________________________
Working on:
911, 110, 53. Listed in order of time of composition.


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#1655056 - 04/05/11 01:08 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Lingyis]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
Originally Posted By: pianojerome

To have found a job that you really love doing is such a blessing, that it would seem almost foolish to throw it away in exchange for something boring but lucrative, wouldn't it?


Yeah, but what if even the musical job in the end isn't something you love doing? There's no guarantee.



Then why would you be there? If it's not your passion...and I don't mean "ohhhh piano is my passion...I love it soooo much"...I mean you live, eat, breathe, dream, think music and the piano. Your entire life revolves around music and the piano. The appointments you make for the week are scheduled AROUND practice time...not the other way round. It's not a hobby. It's not something where you're sitting around one day and find yourself thinking..."hey, I could maybe make money doing this." It's all-consuming. There is no such thing as boredom (God I hate when I hear "I'm bored with this or that piece)...it's a CONSTANT learning process and the fire TO continue learning isn't one that wavers...ever.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

"It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right."

♪ ≠ $


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#1655119 - 04/05/11 02:34 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: stores]
Lingyis Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/15/09
Posts: 786
Loc: New York, NY
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
Originally Posted By: pianojerome

To have found a job that you really love doing is such a blessing, that it would seem almost foolish to throw it away in exchange for something boring but lucrative, wouldn't it?


Yeah, but what if even the musical job in the end isn't something you love doing? There's no guarantee.



Then why would you be there? If it's not your passion...and I don't mean "ohhhh piano is my passion...I love it soooo much"...I mean you live, eat, breathe, dream, think music and the piano. Your entire life revolves around music and the piano. The appointments you make for the week are scheduled AROUND practice time...not the other way round. It's not a hobby. It's not something where you're sitting around one day and find yourself thinking..."hey, I could maybe make money doing this." It's all-consuming. There is no such thing as boredom (God I hate when I hear "I'm bored with this or that piece)...it's a CONSTANT learning process and the fire TO continue learning isn't one that wavers...ever.


Okay, I feel we're going around in a circle.

I'm trying to say what's practical for most people. You're saying passion trumps practical concerns. Which is fine, because in America, it's not like a musician is going to starve to death.

I just don't think it's the proper advice to give to young people, especially when the target is, in my opinion, a minority.
_________________________
Working on:
911, 110, 53. Listed in order of time of composition.


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#1655433 - 04/05/11 11:12 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
survivordan Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/01/09
Posts: 844
Loc: Ohio
Another thing that would deter me personally from Juilliard is the cut-throat competition there. When I talked to one Juilliard graduate pianist, he said that one of his classmates (who had gotten the one full-ride scholarship that the school gives out per year, and as such was...not liked well) went into a practice room and began to play, only to see his fingers gushing blood because of the razor blades that had been stuck in between the keys...
_________________________
Working On:

BACH: Invention No. 13 in a min.
GRIEG: Notturno Op. 54 No. 4
VILLA-LOBOS: O Polichinelo

Next Up:

BACH: Keyboard Concerto in f minor

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#1655448 - 04/05/11 11:35 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: survivordan]
Lingyis Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/15/09
Posts: 786
Loc: New York, NY
Originally Posted By: survivordan
Another thing that would deter me personally from Juilliard is the cut-throat competition there. When I talked to one Juilliard graduate pianist, he said that one of his classmates (who had gotten the one full-ride scholarship that the school gives out per year, and as such was...not liked well) went into a practice room and began to play, only to see his fingers gushing blood because of the razor blades that had been stuck in between the keys...


... is that an urban legend?
_________________________
Working on:
911, 110, 53. Listed in order of time of composition.


Top
#1655449 - 04/05/11 11:36 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
sarah_elizabeth Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 466
Loc: Texas, U.S.
If that story is indeed true, that's just awful.

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#1655460 - 04/06/11 12:21 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Lingyis]
Kreisler Offline



Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13763
Loc: Iowa City, IA
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
Originally Posted By: survivordan
Another thing that would deter me personally from Juilliard is the cut-throat competition there. When I talked to one Juilliard graduate pianist, he said that one of his classmates (who had gotten the one full-ride scholarship that the school gives out per year, and as such was...not liked well) went into a practice room and began to play, only to see his fingers gushing blood because of the razor blades that had been stuck in between the keys...


... is that an urban legend?


That story's been around for at least 15 years. I've heard it told so many times in so many different ways by so many different people (none of them with firsthand experience) that I seriously doubt it's true.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

www.pianoped.com
www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed

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#1655617 - 04/06/11 09:22 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Lingyis]
Pogorelich. Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/08
Posts: 4526
Loc: in the past
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
I just don't think it's the proper advice to give to young people, especially when the target is, in my opinion, a minority.


And it's great advice to say something like, "Just get a job that makes money, spend half of your life in an office and hating it". Please. It's not the proper advice to give to young people when you say, "you should do what you love"? How not?
_________________________

'I want to invest my emotions only in music; it will never disappoint me or hurt me - it is a safe place to be.'

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#1655633 - 04/06/11 09:46 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Lingyis]
feebeeliszt Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/30/10
Posts: 414
Loc: London
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
Originally Posted By: survivordan
Another thing that would deter me personally from Juilliard is the cut-throat competition there. When I talked to one Juilliard graduate pianist, he said that one of his classmates (who had gotten the one full-ride scholarship that the school gives out per year, and as such was...not liked well) went into a practice room and began to play, only to see his fingers gushing blood because of the razor blades that had been stuck in between the keys...


... is that an urban legend?

I am scared crazy
Can he/she still play the piano now?
_________________________
http://www.youtube.com/user/feebeeliszt
The notes I handle no better than many pianists. But the pauses between the notes - ah, that is where the art resides! - Schnabel

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#1655670 - 04/06/11 11:25 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Pogorelich.]
lam132 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 12/09/05
Posts: 12
I have nothing of value to add about Juilliard, as I know next to nothing about the school aside from what I read on this forum, but I thought I'd come out from lurking because the topic of people pursuing a career they love vs. what's practical is always of great interest to me just because of my own recent experiences.

I think that advising young people to major in/pursue "something you love" is not bad advice at all, with the caveat that I think some to many young people go into music figuring they love music, but with no real idea of what being a working music professional is like, and what is involved and required of them. I majored in music because I love music, and ended up hating life because I just didn't have it in me to work that hard and handle the different difficulties of being self-employed and having my job be so time and self consuming. So if an aspiring music major goes in seeing the big picture of the professional music world and recognizes what it will be like, and they're still all about it and wouldn't dream of doing anything else, then yes, those people should pursue what they love. I just don't think it's the right choice for everyone, even some who would say they love music. (And I don't think pursuing something you hate or have little interest in just because it will pay the bills is a good option for anyone, but those certainly aren't the only two options.) Just my 2 cents.

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#1655678 - 04/06/11 11:53 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: lam132]
liszt85 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/26/08
Posts: 3159
Originally Posted By: lam132

I think that advising young people to major in/pursue "something you love" is not bad advice at all, with the caveat that I think some to many young people go into music figuring they love music, but with no real idea of what being a working music professional is like, and what is involved and required of them.


You hit the nail on the head.
_________________________
Current:
Beethoven: Sonata Op.31, No.2 ("Tempest")
Debussy: Danseuses de Delphes (Prelude 1, Book 1)
Next in line:
Chopin: Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op.23
Debussy: Le vent dans la plaine (Prelude 3, Book 1)
Debussy: Les sons et les parfums tournent dans l'air du soir (Prelude 4, Book 1)

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#1655683 - 04/06/11 11:57 AM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Pogorelich.]
Lingyis Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/15/09
Posts: 786
Loc: New York, NY
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
I just don't think it's the proper advice to give to young people, especially when the target is, in my opinion, a minority.


And it's great advice to say something like, "Just get a job that makes money, spend half of your life in an office and hating it". Please. It's not the proper advice to give to young people when you say, "you should do what you love"? How not?


I didn't say pick something you hate. For instance, in college, I wanted to do string theory, but realizing the dwindling funding for theoretical physicists, ended up doing computational biochemistry instead in grad school. (The fields are more closely related than you'd think)

So that part worked out. But what I wasn't prepared, was how grad school and academia was totally different from what I had in mind. It would have been nice if I had received better advice. But at least all's well that end's well--I grinded out my degree and that part is over with, even if it took me longer than I had in mind, and did quantitative finance afterwards (and again, not as farfetched as you'd think).

I would also recommend people do things that they're interested in--but at the same time, you need to make them aware of the consequences. For me, I'm fortunate my studies were heavily math and computer science related. But in a different field, you might not be so fortunate, and that's what young people should be made aware of.

If you have a gift and music is your overriding passion, then go ahead, by all means--that's I mean by "the targeted minority". Your "competitive advantage" is that much higher. For the rest of us, likely most of us, it's important to explore your interests (as long as it's the US system we're talking about).

Those who are currently in music should realize that you are all quite blessed. I have great admiration for you all. Just keep in mind that many are not necessarily as gifted.
_________________________
Working on:
911, 110, 53. Listed in order of time of composition.


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#1655862 - 04/06/11 05:06 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
I know this thread started over the use of the practice rooms and library at Juilliard, but in the OP's post was the little blib on 'getting into' and studying music that a few of us focused on.

That would be my only hesitation to give someone advice to pursue music. Why does it have to be Juilliard? Why does it have to be a conservatory?

How many people recently become passionate about music and choose a school like Juilliard as their main and dream choice? And why, only because it has a name?

I don't think making statements like the above are really any indication that you have the passion and the talent.
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

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#1655875 - 04/06/11 05:28 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Lingyis]
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19227
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
For instance, in college, I wanted to do string theory, but realizing the dwindling funding for theoretical physicists, ended up doing computational biochemistry instead in grad school.
When I was a physics major I wanted to do string theory, but they hadn't invented it yet.

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#1655876 - 04/06/11 05:30 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Pogorelich.]
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19227
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich

And it's great advice to say something like, "Just get a job that makes money, spend half of your life in an office and hating it". Please. It's not the proper advice to give to young people when you say, "you should do what you love"? How not?
Because those aren't the only two choices.

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#1655880 - 04/06/11 05:32 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: ll]
survivordan Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/01/09
Posts: 844
Loc: Ohio
Originally Posted By: ll
I know this thread started over the use of the practice rooms and library at Juilliard, but in the OP's post was the little blib on 'getting into' and studying music that a few of us focused on.

That would be my only hesitation to give someone advice to pursue music. Why does it have to be Juilliard? Why does it have to be a conservatory?

How many people recently become passionate about music and choose a school like Juilliard as their main and dream choice? And why, only because it has a name?

I don't think making statements like the above are really any indication that you have the passion and the talent.


I agree. Juilliard is by no means the be-all end-all of anything! There are so many good conservatories and college music programs, why not one of them?
_________________________
Working On:

BACH: Invention No. 13 in a min.
GRIEG: Notturno Op. 54 No. 4
VILLA-LOBOS: O Polichinelo

Next Up:

BACH: Keyboard Concerto in f minor

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#1655923 - 04/06/11 06:52 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: TylerNB]
fuzzy8balls Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 465
Loc: San Diego, CA
Why these threads pop up every few months to where people say you can only choose "to be in an office hating your job" vs "being a musician and struggling" for the rest of your life?

Guess what, you can have an office job that's very rewarding and you can be a musician that plays concerts and be appreciated by tons of people. Takes a lot of hard work but I think it is a good balance.
_________________________
YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/user/fuzzy8balls

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#1655931 - 04/06/11 07:24 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: Kreisler]
stores Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/09
Posts: 6646
Loc: Here, as opposed to there
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
Originally Posted By: Lingyis
Originally Posted By: survivordan
Another thing that would deter me personally from Juilliard is the cut-throat competition there. When I talked to one Juilliard graduate pianist, he said that one of his classmates (who had gotten the one full-ride scholarship that the school gives out per year, and as such was...not liked well) went into a practice room and began to play, only to see his fingers gushing blood because of the razor blades that had been stuck in between the keys...


... is that an urban legend?


That story's been around for at least 15 years. I've heard it told so many times in so many different ways by so many different people (none of them with firsthand experience) that I seriously doubt it's true.


+1 I've heard this in many variations as well. There's nothing to it...nothing.
_________________________

"And if we look at the works of J.S. Bach — a benevolent god to which all musicians should offer a prayer to defend themselves against mediocrity... -Debussy

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#1655967 - 04/06/11 08:58 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: fuzzy8balls]
pianojerome Offline
9000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/01/05
Posts: 9868
Originally Posted By: fuzzy8balls
Why these threads pop up every few months to where people say you can only choose "to be in an office hating your job" vs "being a musician and struggling" for the rest of your life?

Guess what, you can have an office job that's very rewarding and you can be a musician that plays concerts and be appreciated by tons of people. Takes a lot of hard work but I think it is a good balance.


Absolutely. I didn't mean to suggest that office jobs are all boring -- which is why I called it a "cliché". There are many wonderful jobs outside music.

My point was just that not everyone does find a career that they're passionate about, and as long as one has found such a strong passion for music, it is worthwhile trying to make it one's career. As Kreisler said so well, there are so many jobs in music, not just being a Evgeny Kissin, and often times passionate musicians will find ways to create more or less traditional job opportunities for themselves.
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#1655978 - 04/06/11 09:26 PM Re: Questions About Julliard [Re: pianojerome]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7767
Originally Posted By: pianojerome
Originally Posted By: fuzzy8balls
Why these threads pop up every few months to where people say you can only choose "to be in an office hating your job" vs "being a musician and struggling" for the rest of your life?

Guess what, you can have an office job that's very rewarding and you can be a musician that plays concerts and be appreciated by tons of people. Takes a lot of hard work but I think it is a good balance.


Absolutely. I didn't mean to suggest that office jobs are all boring -- which is why I called it a "cliché". There are many wonderful jobs outside music.

My point was just that not everyone does find a career that they're passionate about, and as long as one has found such a strong passion for music, it is worthwhile trying to make it one's career. As Kreisler said so well, there are so many jobs in music, not just being a Evgeny Kissin, and often times passionate musicians will find ways to create more or less traditional job opportunities for themselves.


I think the ugly truth is that, in the US at least, the majority of people do not like their job, and many people really hate their work. But you gotta live...

And don't I remember reading that most non-piano Juilliard students end up in a career not related to music? And the reason it's limited to non-piano is because they don't have the records on the piano students, so it may be true of them, also, but they just don't know.








Edited by wr (04/06/11 09:27 PM)

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