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#1808085 - 12/18/11 01:18 PM Perfect Pitch - What are the odds?
music producer Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 07/14/11
Posts: 13
I have absolute pitch, and I find it kinda crazy that as the new music director for a small church in our rural area, it turns out the pastor has it as well! Just found it out yesterday at a choir practice...

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#1808090 - 12/18/11 01:33 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
gooddog Online   content
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/08/08
Posts: 4841
Loc: Seattle area, WA
I don't know the odds but I'm curious how you found out.
_________________________
Best regards,

Deborah

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#1808103 - 12/18/11 01:59 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
jnod Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/09
Posts: 794
Loc: Toronto
The odds are pretty low I think. There are some little online tests you can do that will give you a rough idea of your comparative sense of absolute and relative pitch. Relative pitch is much more common and is highly trainable. No so clear whether absolute pitch can be trained without some hefty genetic input.
_________________________
Justin
-------
Bach English Suite #5
Scarlatti Sonata K141 . L422
Mozart Sonata K333
Schubert Impromptu opus 90 D899
Schubert Moment Musicaux opus 94 D780

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#1808144 - 12/18/11 03:06 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
ChopinAddict Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/29/09
Posts: 6159
Loc: Land of the never-ending music
Some say 1:10,000, but we thought there might be more hope here in a recent thread...

Here is a test...
_________________________



Music is my best friend.


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#1808164 - 12/18/11 03:49 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
fledgehog Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/09/11
Posts: 273
Loc: West Hartford, CT
in a music-oriented setting you're far more likely to run into other people with perfect pitch. In my high school I wasn't aware of anyone else who had it, but in college (music conservatory), i know a handful of kids who do, and so far i've had two ear training professors and a theory professor with perfect pitch.

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#1808490 - 12/19/11 06:31 AM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
kevinb Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 1565
I've always thought that true perfect pitch (i.e., an ability to identify the exact note on any instrument) is vanishingly rare. In nearly forty years of playing music I've met one person with that particular gift. I've met a handful who can reliably identify exact notes on their own instrument. In such cases, my feeling has been that what these people are identifying is subtle pitch-related variations in timbre, not pitch as such.

However, other contributors on this forum have shown me good research evidence that true perfect pitch might be much more common that I though -- particular among Asian people.

So this seems to me to be any open question.

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#1808513 - 12/19/11 08:18 AM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: kevinb]
ando Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/10
Posts: 3694
Loc: Melbourne, Australia
Originally Posted By: kevinb
I've always thought that true perfect pitch (i.e., an ability to identify the exact note on any instrument) is vanishingly rare. In nearly forty years of playing music I've met one person with that particular gift. I've met a handful who can reliably identify exact notes on their own instrument. In such cases, my feeling has been that what these people are identifying is subtle pitch-related variations in timbre, not pitch as such.



I've met at least a dozen people with perfect pitch during my studies. I don't consider it to be particularly special, nor could I definitively link it with super musical abilities. Some were technically strong performers, some weren't. It's not as rare as one might think. At any decent music college, you would find several students with perfect pitch. It's generally the product of starting musical education at a very young age (usually age 3 or earlier), but sometimes later. For people who start this early, I don't believe it is very rare at all.

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#1808517 - 12/19/11 08:46 AM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
Gerard12 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 767
Loc: South Carolina
I find that just about all of the musicians that I work with in the jazz arena have perfect pitch. In the classical realm, I find that singers, string players, and conductors are more apt to have it.

Regardless, many of them claim that it is something that we allow ourselves to have. Though, I suspect that many of the jazzers pick it up by osmosis: Many of them don't read music that well and after years of trial and error and concentration (for some), are able to pick up everything by ear.

I find it odd that my own sense of pitch works best with softer sounds, but as the volume increases I'm less accurate - I can be off as much as a whole step in really loud situations.
_________________________
Piano performance and instruction (former college music professor).

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#1808594 - 12/19/11 12:00 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
rob.art Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/13/11
Posts: 187
firstly nothing is perfect, secondly - almost anybody can have perfect pitch if he/she really wanted to.

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#1808595 - 12/19/11 12:02 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
chrisbell Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 1371
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
that's a myth
_________________________

I never play anything the same way once.

https://soundcloud.com/chrisb/sets
https://www.youtube.com/user/djboing/videos

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#1808618 - 12/19/11 12:46 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
Maxtor Offline

Bronze Supporter until Jan 01 2013


Registered: 08/14/11
Posts: 182
It's possible, but also compare it to a concept like "perfect color recognition", and consider how much the brain tricks most people. For example, everyone will see a ripe banana as yellow, no matter what brightness and shade of light it is in. However, the actual color perceived by the eyes may be very different, and could be more green or blue than yellow; but the brain knows bananas and thus makes it yellow. The clearest test of this was a fruit basket in front of a tile wall in which the tiles exactly matched the different colors of the fruits; it's fascinating to watch the tiles change colors as the light was filtered in different ways, while the fruit didn't seem to change.
There is a culture that names colors based on hues and shades, rather than what we consider "colors" (we use the wavelength of the light). They may see sky blue and gold as virtually the same color, while we perceive a huge difference. On the other hand, they can tell the difference between the different shades of blue and aqua easily, while we have more difficulty. I think this was part of a BBC documentary a few months ago (you could compare it to the difference between recognizing pitch versus recognizing chords). Try finding the colors brown or gray in the wavelight spectrum; you won't find them, but the brain manages to create them.
Finally, when you see at night, your eyes are detecting more in black and white than in color, because a different type of cell is better for night vision.

Interestingly, smells can be recognized and remembered relatively clearly by a significant portion of the population. The BBC also recently did a documentary about perfume and cologne designers, and some of them memorize thousands of chemicals that humans can identify by smell. However, this involves identifying a chemical compound, whereas a musical pitch is a very different thing.


I think it's easier to recognize pitch if I have some type of reference. For example, I know the pitch I speak at in normal conversation. For someone with absolute pitch, I'm curious if they learned how frequencies resonate within their ear, and can make a good initial judgement based on that. Give them a pitch made by a screwed up sine wave and see how well they identify it.

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#1808624 - 12/19/11 12:53 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: chrisbell]
rob.art Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/13/11
Posts: 187
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
that's a myth


yes, it's a myth that you either have it or not.
consider this:




you just have to rediscover child like listening to music.

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#1808628 - 12/19/11 01:04 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
charleslang Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 2084
I don't have perfect pitch, but I've gotten better, or 'closer' to having it. When I go to the piano each day, before playing, I always hum what I think to be middle C. About 50 percent of the time, I'm right on it. I'm never above it, and I don't think I've been more than a half step flat for a long time.

That's better than what I used to be able to manage. I think that what has helped is working on pieces in all the twelve keys, and practicing a lot (more than two hours on many or most days).

Practicing the very same piece (not practicing different pieces in different keys) in all the twelve keys helps to get your brain to differentiate the characters of the different keys. I hope to eventually have perfect pitch, but honing my relative pitch abilities is more important and my first priority.
_________________________
Charles Lang

Baldwin Model R; Hardman 5'9" grand; Rieger-Kloss vertical

Jazz, pop and classical

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#1808631 - 12/19/11 01:12 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
jnod Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/09
Posts: 794
Loc: Toronto
People mix up perfect or absolute pitch where, with no reference you can tell what note the vacuum cleaner is making and relative pitch where you can compare an unnamed note to a named one and say what it is. The latter is common and a product of training. THe former is rare, can be assisted by training but not necessarily.
_________________________
Justin
-------
Bach English Suite #5
Scarlatti Sonata K141 . L422
Mozart Sonata K333
Schubert Impromptu opus 90 D899
Schubert Moment Musicaux opus 94 D780

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#1808643 - 12/19/11 01:36 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: jnod]
gooddog Online   content
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/08/08
Posts: 4841
Loc: Seattle area, WA
Originally Posted By: jnod
People mix up perfect or absolute pitch where, with no reference you can tell what note the vacuum cleaner is making and relative pitch where you can compare an unnamed note to a named one and say what it is. The latter is common and a product of training. THe former is rare, can be assisted by training but not necessarily.
I've always wondered how much training is associated with absolute pitch. A non literate, untrained 3 year old novice who has innate absolute pitch can't possibly know what "Ab" means. Identifying note names has to be trained. Is absolute pitch then the ability to remember specific frequencies? Does being around badly tuned instruments affect the development of absolute pitch?

I also wonder if absolute pitch is an advantage or disadvantage. I definitely do not have absolute pitch but I have very good relative pitch. When I hear an instrument that is out of tune, I crawl the walls, even if it is just one instrument and one note in an orchestra. I would imagine having absolute pitch would make this even more torturous.
_________________________
Best regards,

Deborah

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#1808647 - 12/19/11 01:38 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
cinstance Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/12/09
Posts: 104
My son can tell every note's name out of up to 5 keys played simultaneously, while I would not even be able to tell how many notes were played smile. That's something I called absolute pitch. We found it out at about month two since he started piano study. He could easily tell the key signature of a music played by the end of the first measure, which was before he even knew about all the scales. That's how we found it out.

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#1808651 - 12/19/11 01:45 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: fledgehog]
jeffreyjones Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/31/10
Posts: 2392
Loc: San Jose, CA
Originally Posted By: fledgehog
in a music-oriented setting you're far more likely to run into other people with perfect pitch. In my high school I wasn't aware of anyone else who had it, but in college (music conservatory), i know a handful of kids who do, and so far i've had two ear training professors and a theory professor with perfect pitch.


That's just mean, someone with perfect pitch teaching ear training.. I'm picturing Kareem Abdul-Jabbar teaching a junior high class how to dunk a basketball. Unfair advantage. And for the record, I do have perfect pitch, to the point that I can identify the pitch signature of random objects and "unpitched" percussion instruments. People don't realize the extent to which music is literally everywhere..

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#1808672 - 12/19/11 02:24 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: ChopinAddict]
GradedPiano Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/15/11
Posts: 123
Originally Posted By: ChopinAddict
Some say 1:10,000, but we thought there might be more hope here in a recent thread...

Here is a test...


i got 0/12

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#1808711 - 12/19/11 03:02 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: rob.art]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5587
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: rob.art
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
that's a myth


yes, it's a myth that you either have it or not.
consider this:




you just have to rediscover child like listening to music.



What is the point of this post???
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#1808777 - 12/19/11 04:20 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: AZNpiano]
RonaldSteinway Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/11/08
Posts: 1510
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
Originally Posted By: rob.art
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
that's a myth


yes, it's a myth that you either have it or not.
consider this:




you just have to rediscover child like listening to music.





What is the point of this post???


I think what he meant is that you can re-learn everything. If now you are a baby, and are taught the word red means blue, you will be able to do it.


I used to teach many kids when I just got off of the boat. I noticed some kids could become perfect pitch within 2 months of learning to play piano, some would take several years, and some just were never able. To be honest, I think one must have the gene first. I think it is the same like color blind people. If you are color blind, no matter how much you practice, you won't be able to see the color.

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#1808783 - 12/19/11 04:29 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: RonaldSteinway]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5587
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: RonaldSteinway
I think what he meant is that you can re-learn everything. If now you are a baby, and are taught the word red means blue, you will be able to do it.


Really? I think it's supposed to be one of those quasi-psychological tests, telling you to name the color in which the word is written instead of reading the actual words "red" and "blue." When you have to do ten of those mismatched color/words, you're bound to make a few errors, because our brains have been wired to read words, not tell the color of words.

I just don't get what that has anything to do with perfect pitch.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#1808787 - 12/19/11 04:32 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
Devane Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 403
Loc: Ireland

Originally Posted By: ChopinAddict
Some say 1:10,000, but we thought there might be more hope here in a recent thread...

Here is a test...


Any site selling AP courses no doubt sell ashtrays for your motorbike, DVD rewinders and all other pointless products. One site gives 60% commission for people to link to their site. $53.23 a sale. You could earn $1,916,280.00 a year. Not available in the shops. When you get it you’ll know why.


1 in 10,000?
"However, this is an unreliable estimate without any empirical evidence and is likely to be cited to overstate the rarity of AP"
Ken’ichi Miyazaki - How well do we understand Absolute Pitch (2004)

The figure 1 in 10,000 is a general population guesstimate (from Ward, W.D. (1999) Absolute pitch.) This figure would derive from a guess of what percentage of children play an instrument starting within the critical period. When you look at direct figures in the relevant subset (young musicians) it’s about 1,000 times less rare.

Originally Posted By: fledgehog
in a music-oriented setting you're far more likely to run into other people with perfect pitch.


Yes. If you look in the appropriate place you’ll not only find them but statistically they’re not rare. There are conditions that influence the likelihood of retaining AP.


Professor Oliver Sacks posted the whole chapter from his book “Musicophilia”. Feel free to look up the authors mentioned within the article.

"For students who had begun musical training between ages four and five," they wrote, "approximately 60 percent of the Chinese students met the criterion for absolute pitch, while only about 14 percent of the U.S. nontone language speakers met the criterion.” For those who had begun musical training at age six or seven, the numbers in both groups were correspondingly lower, about 55 percent and 6 percent. And for students who had begun musical training later still, at age eight or nine, roughly 42 percent of the Chinese students met the criterion while none of the U.S. nontone language speakers did so. There were no differences between genders in either group.
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/alumni/Magazine/Fall2007/PitchPerfectMatch.html

So at best (age 4 or 5) given the prerequisite conditions, 14% for non-tonal speakers and 60% for tonal-language speakers. After that, the figures drop. The non-tonal speakers plummet.


Documented number of Adults learning AP? Zero

"In every scientifically documented case, the adult had slower responses, suggesting that (s)he had learned only a few "landmark" tones, and was using relative pitch to calculate the remaining pitches from there. This is what Bachem (1954), Ward (1982) and others have called pseudo-absolute pitch. I am emphatically NOT saying that Stephen is mistaken, and I am NOT saying that adults cannot learn AP; rather, I am saying that there are no scientifically documented cases of adults learning AP."
Daniel Levitin
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Talk:Absolute_pitch&oldid=302937570


At least get that zero figure a little higher before you spend your time and money on a pointless endeavour.
_________________________
Say it to my face! wink
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b9rOji_PWY

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#1808791 - 12/19/11 04:40 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: RonaldSteinway]
rob.art Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/13/11
Posts: 187
Originally Posted By: RonaldSteinway
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
Originally Posted By: rob.art
Originally Posted By: chrisbell
that's a myth


yes, it's a myth that you either have it or not.
consider this:




you just have to rediscover child like listening to music.





What is the point of this post???


I think what he meant is that you can re-learn everything. If now you are a baby, and are taught the word red means blue, you will be able to do it.


I used to teach many kids when I just got off of the boat. I noticed some kids could become perfect pitch within 2 months of learning to play piano, some would take several years, and some just were never able. To be honest, I think one must have the gene first. I think it is the same like color blind people. If you are color blind, no matter how much you practice, you won't be able to see the color.


yes, more or less what I meant and I agree, not all people will be able to re-learn but if you tone dead you shouldn't be seeking carrier in music anyway smile

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#1808793 - 12/19/11 04:43 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: AZNpiano]
rob.art Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/13/11
Posts: 187
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano

I just don't get what that has anything to do with perfect pitch.


that's why you won't get it...

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#1808799 - 12/19/11 04:53 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: rob.art]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5587
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: rob.art
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano

I just don't get what that has anything to do with perfect pitch.


that's why you won't get it...


Get what??? What's "it"??

Please write clearly if you wish to engage in an intellectual discussion.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#1808800 - 12/19/11 04:55 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: rob.art]
currawong Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/15/07
Posts: 5976
Loc: Down Under
Originally Posted By: rob.art
I agree, not all people will be able to re-learn but if you tone dead you shouldn't be seeking carrier in music anyway smile
Huh? You're saying people who don't have absolute pitch are "tone dead"? (or "tone deaf", if that's what you meant) Sounds like you don't know much about relative pitch.
_________________________
Du holde Kunst...

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#1808802 - 12/19/11 04:57 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: gooddog]
jnod Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/09
Posts: 794
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: gooddog
A non literate, untrained 3 year old novice who has innate absolute pitch can't possibly know what "Ab" means. Identifying note names has to be trained. Is absolute pitch then the ability to remember specific frequencies? Does being around badly tuned instruments affect the development of absolute pitch?

I also wonder if absolute pitch is an advantage or disadvantage. I definitely do not have absolute pitch but I have very good relative pitch. When I hear an instrument that is out of tune, I crawl the walls, even if it is just one instrument and one note in an orchestra. I would imagine having absolute pitch would make this even more torturous.


Now that's a question - for that matter, is perfect pitch at European, American or Baroque frequency? I forget what they are but they're all different. Ditto for me on the 'one instrument out of tune' allergy and I think that's a classic relative pitch thing. I mean, the frame of reference is clear: first desk second violin is out of tune relative to the rest of the orchestra not the other way around....
_________________________
Justin
-------
Bach English Suite #5
Scarlatti Sonata K141 . L422
Mozart Sonata K333
Schubert Impromptu opus 90 D899
Schubert Moment Musicaux opus 94 D780

Top
#1808805 - 12/19/11 04:59 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: Devane]
cinstance Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/12/09
Posts: 104
Originally Posted By: Devane

Originally Posted By: ChopinAddict
Some say 1:10,000, but we thought there might be more hope here in a recent thread...

Here is a test...


Any site selling AP courses no doubt sell ashtrays for your motorbike, DVD rewinders and all other pointless products. One site gives 60% commission for people to link to their site. $53.23 a sale. You could earn $1,916,280.00 a year. Not available in the shops. When you get it you’ll know why.


1 in 10,000?
"However, this is an unreliable estimate without any empirical evidence and is likely to be cited to overstate the rarity of AP"
Ken’ichi Miyazaki - How well do we understand Absolute Pitch (2004)

The figure 1 in 10,000 is a general population guesstimate (from Ward, W.D. (1999) Absolute pitch.) This figure would derive from a guess of what percentage of children play an instrument starting within the critical period. When you look at direct figures in the relevant subset (young musicians) it’s about 1,000 times less rare.

Originally Posted By: fledgehog
in a music-oriented setting you're far more likely to run into other people with perfect pitch.


Yes. If you look in the appropriate place you’ll not only find them but statistically they’re not rare. There are conditions that influence the likelihood of retaining AP.


Professor Oliver Sacks posted the whole chapter from his book “Musicophilia”. Feel free to look up the authors mentioned within the article.

"For students who had begun musical training between ages four and five," they wrote, "approximately 60 percent of the Chinese students met the criterion for absolute pitch, while only about 14 percent of the U.S. nontone language speakers met the criterion.” For those who had begun musical training at age six or seven, the numbers in both groups were correspondingly lower, about 55 percent and 6 percent. And for students who had begun musical training later still, at age eight or nine, roughly 42 percent of the Chinese students met the criterion while none of the U.S. nontone language speakers did so. There were no differences between genders in either group.
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/alumni/Magazine/Fall2007/PitchPerfectMatch.html

So at best (age 4 or 5) given the prerequisite conditions, 14% for non-tonal speakers and 60% for tonal-language speakers. After that, the figures drop. The non-tonal speakers plummet.


Documented number of Adults learning AP? Zero

"In every scientifically documented case, the adult had slower responses, suggesting that (s)he had learned only a few "landmark" tones, and was using relative pitch to calculate the remaining pitches from there. This is what Bachem (1954), Ward (1982) and others have called pseudo-absolute pitch. I am emphatically NOT saying that Stephen is mistaken, and I am NOT saying that adults cannot learn AP; rather, I am saying that there are no scientifically documented cases of adults learning AP."
Daniel Levitin
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Talk:Absolute_pitch&oldid=302937570


At least get that zero figure a little higher before you spend your time and money on a pointless endeavour.


The data for Chinese student is far from the reality. In the community I live, There are nearly 50 Chinese speaking students, almost all of them learn instrument of some kind (mostly piano) from early age. Only two of them have absolute pitch as far as I know (it is a very tight community that I know almost every kids). I think those data might apply to the preparatory school of the Central music Conservatory, which is far different from the general Chinese student population.

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#1808816 - 12/19/11 05:24 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: currawong]
rob.art Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/13/11
Posts: 187
Originally Posted By: currawong
Originally Posted By: rob.art
I agree, not all people will be able to re-learn but if you tone dead you shouldn't be seeking carrier in music anyway smile
Huh? You're saying people who don't have absolute pitch are "tone dead"? (or "tone deaf", if that's what you meant) Sounds like you don't know much about relative pitch.




ok, I'm outta this thread.

Top
#1808819 - 12/19/11 05:30 PM Re: Perfect Pitch - What are the odds? [Re: music producer]
Devane Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 403
Loc: Ireland
Originally Posted By: kevinb
In such cases, my feeling has been that what these people are identifying is subtle pitch-related variations in timbre, not pitch as such.

Yes. AP seems to be dependent on specific instruments. I don’t recall any experiment on non-musical instruments though some people can do this. You’re likely to get a huge failure rate with nothing interesting to derive from it.

"The accuracy of AP identification is dependent on the
timbre of the tones to be identified
."
Ken’ichi Miyazaki


When I hear an “A” , I identify it by its sound. “A” sounds like all the other “A’s” . The texture/chroma/colour is dependent on the frequency. It’s a repeating spectrum.

This mechanism is why when you have AP you are prone to errors.
http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/1728061/1.html

Why memorizing notes frequencies is not AP

It is not pitch height (octave placement) but pitch class (musical characteristics of a scale tone within an octave) that AP listeners perceive directly. It is assumed that AP listeners adopt the two-stage process in which they identify pitch class of the presented tone and
then locate its octave position. By contrast, people having no AP are insensitive to pitch class but are able to classify tones into rough pitch categories in terms of timbral
characteristics correlated with positions in the frequency continuum. AP listeners and non-AP listeners seem to be equivalent in accuracy in identifying pitch height.”
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/ast/25/6/426/_pdf
Daniel Levitin also points pitch perception being the same.

Also...

"Because the pitch of a pure tone depends on its intensity (Stevens, 1935), results of absolute pitch experiments using pure tones should be interpreted with caution."
http://www.uni-graz.at/richard.parncutt/publications/PaLe01_GroveAbsPitch.pdf
_________________________
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b9rOji_PWY

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