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#1957528 - 09/11/12 04:52 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3440
Loc: Maine
When counting half-steps, it's like counting steps walking: you count each step you take. Don't count your starting point as a step.

So, to figure out B major chord.
Start at B.
Take 1 half-step, arrive at C
Take 2nd half-step, arrive at C#
Take 3rd half-step, arrive at D
Take 4th half-step, arrive at D#

OK, we just found D# as the second note of the B chord.
Start at D#.
Take 1 half-step, arrive at E
Take 2nd half-step, arrive at F
Take 3rd half-step, arrive at F#

So from B to D# is 4 half-steps, and from D# to F# is 3 half-steps. So B major chord is B D# F#. So you were right that it is B D# F#.

Does that make sense? Check it on some other major chords.

~~~~~~
Augmented triads are the three note chords illustrated in the fourth column of the chart. They are indicated with either "aug" (as in Caug) or "+" (as in C+). I think major and minor are much much much more common than augmented chords, so you could easily ignore augmented chords for now. But I could be wrong.

~~~~~~
As to whether the chords are the same in either hand: yes and no, depending on what you meant by your question.

Yes, when you're simply playing the simple forms of the chords shown in the chart, play the same notes with either hand, or both hands.

No, when you start to find more creative ways to play from a lead sheet you probably won't play the same thing in the RH as in the LH, and you probably won't play the chord in the basic position shown here. For example, Cm, would you play C Eb G all squashed together? Probably not. Maybe you'll play C and C an octave higher in the LH, and Eb and G high up in the RH. Maybe you'll play C and G in the LH, and Eb and Eb an octave higher in the RH. Maybe you'll play C in the LH, and C Eb G spread out in the RH. Or any of many other possibilities. Those would all count as Cm, even though the notes have been scrambled up and spread around from the plain presentation of C Eb G on the chart all squashed together.
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Ebaug(maj7)

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#1957556 - 09/11/12 05:44 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: PianoStudent88]
Tech 5 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/12
Posts: 194
Loc: South Carolina
Woe!! This way beyond my ability to comprehend ( the last two paragraphs), but maybe someday. I understand the first part. Thanks for clarifying the counting of 1/2 steps. I really appreciate all the info. I will print it and refer back to it a little at a time.

So, am I to understand that all this chord activity is for popular music only. Chords are not played the same in classical music, right?

You never have "lead" sheets in classical music?

Thanks again!
_________________________
Virginia

"Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do."
J.Wooden

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#1957560 - 09/11/12 06:03 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
PianoStudent88 Offline
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Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3440
Loc: Maine
Sorry for the last two paragraphs being incomprehensible. Said more succinctly: Yes, while learning these just play them the same in RH and LH. This is a basic simple outline. Later on, as with everything in music, things will look more complex. But I'm trying to stay simple.

Answering your other question: These chords appear in both popular and classical music.

Normally classical music is not labeled with the chord names. As part of analysing the music, someone learning the music might very well write in the chord names implied by the music.

Classical music is sort of the reverse of a lead sheet. On a lead sheet, you get the chord names and have to make up an accompaniment. In classical music, you get all the notes and have to figure out the chord names if you want them.

Last week I saw a Bach Fake Book (Bach in lead sheet format), so anything's possible! grin
_________________________
Ebaug(maj7)

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#1957564 - 09/11/12 06:08 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3440
Loc: Maine
Originally Posted By: Tech 5
You never have "lead" sheets in classical music?

In the Baroque era they had a version of lead sheets, called "figured bass." Just like lead sheets, this was a system which told the accompanist what harmonies to play in the accompaniment, but didn't specify exactly how to play the accompaniment.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose! (The more things change, the more they're the same thing.)
_________________________
Ebaug(maj7)

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#1957584 - 09/11/12 06:46 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: keystring]
LoPresti Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/07/10
Posts: 1304
Loc: New York
Hey, KeyString, this is a Red Letter Day! I agree with absolutely EVERYTHING you wrote here!!

Originally Posted By: keystring
. . . These charts may have their uses, but they can become a crutch like constantly using a dictionary to look up every word because the principals of spelling aren't known.

A perfect simile!

Originally Posted By: keystring
Ed, I understand that in some places they use the "dim" symbol to mean "dim7" and that it will be found in music, but I disagree with it when that happens because it leads to confusion. There is a difference between a diminished triad and a diminished seven.

Absolutely. I am not the one who brought up this notion - it was our esteemed colleague who has a username too long for me to write. I chose not to dispute the idea in this thread because of the detailed explanation it requires. I did point out, for those who might understand it, that the augmented triads were not similarly bastardized.

Originally Posted By: keystring
Btw, if you were not allowed to post in the forum, we wouldn't be seeing your post because then admin. would have blocked your access.

I believe exclusion was by acclamation, or popular vote, or something like that.

O.K. I'm ready for your rebuttal . . .
Ed
_________________________
In music, everything one does correctly helps everything else.

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#1957590 - 09/11/12 07:00 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: PianoStudent88]
LoPresti Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/07/10
Posts: 1304
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: PianoStudent88
When counting half-steps, it's like counting steps walking: you count each step you take. Don't count your starting point as a step.

So, to figure out B major chord.
Start at B.
Take 1 half-step, arrive at C
Take 2nd half-step, arrive at C#
Take 3rd half-step, arrive at D
Take 4th half-step, arrive at D#

Does that make sense?

It absolutely makes sense, UNTIL the semantics get sticky: Virginia will eventually read somewhere that the interval from B to C is a second.

Ed
_________________________
In music, everything one does correctly helps everything else.

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#1957593 - 09/11/12 07:05 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12576
Loc: Canada
Ed, there is only one thing I'd like to explore - namely augmented chords. In music itself I see varying spelling choices. The aug chord happens along with whole tone passages (among others), and writing a whole tone scale in and of itself is a tricky business. I've run into augmented chords where it was a toss up between G# and Ab for a given note, and there were reasons why the composer made this or that choice. That is the bottom line for diminished seven chords as well: what else is going on in the music.


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#1957594 - 09/11/12 07:12 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
PianoStudent88 Offline
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Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3440
Loc: Maine
Quote:
It absolutely makes sense, UNTIL the semantics get sticky: Virginia will eventually read somewhere that the interval from B to C is a second.

Yes, and when that comes up I'll point out that there is a different way to wrap one's head around that terminology.

You have to be able to count two ways in music: cardinal (as in 4 half-steps) and ordinal (as in major third). But I'm only explaining one of those ways at a time.
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#1957596 - 09/11/12 07:17 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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To Virginia:
I have found in teaching that the most effective way is to go from the known and familiar. So with that in mind I'd like to go over some of the ideas already presented and what I think is crucial for a start.

1. You are familiar with the C major scale. On the piano we can see and hear the notes of C major without worrying about black keys, and those notes are also there in written music the same way. We can use the C major scale and white keys as a model.

2. Concept of "steps". Consider these to be a unit of measurement in the same way that inches are a small unit of measure. An interval is a distance between two notes (pitches), and if so, we want to be able to measure the distance.

Print this out and go to the piano. Play C. If you go to the closest piano key touching C, you'll have moved up to the black key (C# or Db). THAT is a step. If you have moved over one key, then you have moved one step (also known as semitone).

Now consider D, which is the next note in the C major scale. If you were an ant that had to crawl from C to D, you would climb up the C# piano key, and back down to the white D key. You have moved two half steps. This is how we use that unit of measure.

Why do we bother with this? Consider the adjacent black key. If we play those two notes one after the other, then we might say we went from C to C# or from C to Db. For the way notes are spelled (written down), the NAME of the interval would be called something different. But the SOUND is the same. The DISTANCE between them is the same.

It is handy to have some kind of measuring unit. I don't use "half step" very often, but it is absolutely useful to understand.

(to be continued)

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#1957598 - 09/11/12 07:24 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12576
Loc: Canada
(continuation)
Go back to your C major scale. Starting on C, which is the "tonic" or starting note, we can call D, E, F etc. note number 1, note number 2, note number 3. These are the "degrees" of the scale. E is the 3rd degree of C major, F is the 4th degree, etc. always counting from the bottom.

Explore C to D - there are those two half steps. D to E - you're climbing over a black note again - two half steps - E to F, you only travel one half step.

You will find the same pattern in B major: B to C# = two half steps - C# to D# = two have steps, D # to E = one half step. every major scale will have the same pattern.
A half step = H; two half steps are a whole tone = H. The pattern in any major scale is WWHWWWH.
C(W)D(W)E(H)F(W)G(W)A(W)B(H)C

If for any reason you need to find such patterns, go back to C major on the piano, knowing that your white notes give all the notes of the scale, and explore the patterns.

If people talk about half steps, go back to a visual model.

Also use SOUND: A half step has a very unique (and jarring) sound. Play a bunch of half step intervals together all over the piano. Then try two-step (whole tone) and notice the unique sound of that.

(continued)

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#1957601 - 09/11/12 07:35 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12576
Loc: Canada
(continuation)
Now let's explore the relationship between scales and chords. We'll start with our major scale, and again we'll use C major as a model.

If we take notes 1,3,5 (1st, 3rd, 5th degree) then we get CEG which is a major chord. The minor chord would be CEbG (our light switch toggle). Now, is the I chord (chord built on the first degree of that scale) major because those are the notes of the major scale? Or is the C major scale what it is because its I-chord is CEG? The fact is that they interrelate.

Play the first 5 notes of C major: C,D,E,F,G. Then alter it: C,D,Eb,F,G. Did the second version sound as if it was about to become a minor scale, and did it have a sadder mood? Did you notice that notes 1,3,5 of the second would give you Cm as chord?

For the rest I'll leave you to explore theory on your own. Start by exploring chords: major and minor as I described. Try inverting them, meaning that you put one of the other chords on the bottom. Listen. Notice where you find what in music?

-- In regards to your other question: In popular music and by ear music people learn to understand these chords since they need to be able to put in the right chord. In classical music the composers have chosen chords that work in music, following similar principals. When you start to understand music theory, then classical music becomes more predictable and understanding. It makes reading and interpreting easier.

I'm done. (phew)

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#1957607 - 09/11/12 07:51 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
Bob Newbie Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/02/06
Posts: 1555
It would be beneficial if lead sheets indicated which inversion of a chord should be used
(1st 2nd or 3rd) in the chord symbol..unfortunately they don't..leaving it to the player to figure it out.


Edited by Bob Newbie (09/11/12 07:52 PM)

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#1957609 - 09/11/12 07:53 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: keystring]
LoPresti Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/07/10
Posts: 1304
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: keystring
Ed, there is only one thing I'd like to explore - namely augmented chords. In music itself I see varying spelling choices.

The composer is primarily interested in the SOUND. Also, s/he typically strives for clarity and smoothness within each "voice" unto itself, or between inversions of chords; and will therefore choose the note (accidental) that READS easiest. Usually this will mean using flats in descending lines, and sharps in ascending lines - GENERALLY. So here, a C - E - Ab - Bb, that were brought together by various voice lines, are perfectly legitimate.

When we move into the realm of theory, where we are constructing chords, we do that by a pretty strict set of rules. In fact, there is one, and only one way, to spell virtually any common chord. In this realm, C - E - G# - Bb in THE only correct spelling of a C augmented seventh chord.

And in the arena of analysis, wide knowledge and flexibility are key. So, the analyst sees the composer's C - E - Ab - Bb, recognizes it as sounding (functioning) as a C augmented seventh chord, names it C aug. 7 (C+7). The analyst would never SPELL a C augmented seventh chord with an Ab, however.

Diminished chords are no different: The composer writes the voices expediciously; the theorist constructs each and every one in a precise way; and the analyst attempts to resolve these by stacking the notes in thirds and seeing what it looks like.

(Poor Virginia . . .)
Ed
_________________________
In music, everything one does correctly helps everything else.

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#1957615 - 09/11/12 08:10 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
Tech 5 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/12
Posts: 194
Loc: South Carolina
Wow! Amazing! Thank you so much, Keystring. I have saved and printed your extensive post. I'm certain it will help alleviate much of my confusion.

I really appreciate the time you put into responding to my post. How long did it take you to learn all this stuff?
_________________________
Virginia

"Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do."
J.Wooden

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#1957626 - 09/11/12 08:46 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12576
Loc: Canada
Virginia, my path is an odd one. It influences some of my thoughts on learning to understand theory.

The only thing I learned in music as a child was singing Do Re Mi around grade 3. The teacher pointed to solfege names and we went up and down in patterns. So I had an ear version of the white keys of the piano representing the major scale, and natural minor scale (going from A to A will give you natural minor. The key of A minor shares the same key signature with the key of C major). I got a little electric keyboard the blew air over reeds and a 10 page booklet that introduced the C, F and G chords which I sounded out as "do mi so", "fa la do" and "so ti re" and then listened the sound. Then later I was given a piano and inherited some piano books which were all sonatinas, and I sounded these out too. I found the piano note, listened to where "Do" was, and played.

I didn't have lessons until I was almost 50 - not piano - and we didn't know that I didn't know notes until a few years after that. I started to study theory a few years ago.

When I was young I experimented and listened. I would play GA and listen to what that sounded like. I'd play CE and CEb and the Cm and C major chords. None of it had names for me, but these became toys to play with.

So decades later when I learned theory, starting with note names and key signatures, I was studying things that I had explored. They held meaning. Later on I ran into teachers who stressed the need to explore theory, having it in the ears and hands before paper. Given my experience, this seems the right way to go.

I've been studying theory intensely for about 5 years now. I think I have a head start because of my background.

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#1957629 - 09/11/12 08:51 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
JamesPlaysPiano Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 125
Hi again, Virginia,

First: you don't count B because what you're counting are the half-steps, which are in-between the notes- not the notes themselves. You're counting "how many times you stepped forward," as it were. If you start on B, and then "step forward" four times, you'll land on D#. In doing this, you'd say "one" on the note C, (because it's the first step), "two" on C#, and so on.

This will always work, in all keys. I wonder if you might have just gotten confused on this one, as you said.

Second: you asked about augmented triads. They are like a major triad with the top note (assuming you're in root position) raised by one. For example, a C major triad = C E G. The C augmented triad = C E G#.

Next: yes, the chords are the same when played with either hand. That is, the chords are still made up of the same notes. However, the fingering will be different, since the hands are symmetrical.

Finally: I think it's really great that you're asking so many good questions! However, if you're feeling overwhelmed at all, it may be helpful to start at the beginning with major triads, and systematically work through the different chord types, each in all 12 keys. This is no small task, of course! However, it would give you a solid foundation, and a thorough understanding of the simpler chords makes it easier to understand the more complex ones.

If it's any help, here is a lesson I wrote on major triads, using a combination of different illustrations and methods. There's a chart you can download at the bottom of the page:

http://www.betterpiano.com/archives/major-triads

Good luck with all your studies!

James
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Facebook groups: Jazz Piano Chat • Blues Piano Chat • Pop Piano Chat

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#1957631 - 09/11/12 08:56 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: JamesPlaysPiano]
JamesPlaysPiano Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 125
Ha! I first started typing that post like an hour ago, in response to Virginia's question about the augmented triads. I typed away a little at a time in-between feeding the kids dinner. I hit "Post" and a whole "page" worth of responses have been posted! You all are on the ball today. smile

James




_________________________
Free book, yadda-yadda- go here.
Facebook groups: Jazz Piano Chat • Blues Piano Chat • Pop Piano Chat

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#1957632 - 09/11/12 08:57 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
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Loc: Canada
James, you might want to add to your definition that in root position, a triad must skip letter names. We get the same sound with CEbG and CD#G but only the first is a triad even though they are both "three letter chords". Here we get into spelling and grammar of written notation.

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#1957645 - 09/11/12 09:22 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: LoPresti]
keystring Offline
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Ed, I'll respond once since these are more in the area of teaching than ABF matters. I understand your explanation, and it makes sense to me. You also mentioned composers, theorists, and analysts.

Here is how I see it:

First we have music which contains things like chords. The composer has composed it so that the performer will play it and the audience will be moved by it. The composer must bring his intention across to the performer as clearly as possible. Our humble chord sits in the middle of all this. And the student is the future composer or performer who must now, at this stage, play music that has been composed, as part of his learning.

Our chord (played together - not broken) is a group of pitches heard at the same time, giving it a unique quality that we might name major, minor, augmented, etc. That is what it is. The pianist presses piano keys that will produce those sounds. Whether we want to call one of those F# or Gb, the sound and piano key stays the same.

Meanwhile our chord sits in the context of music. It is in a key, coming from a preceding chord and moving to a subsequent chord and it may be part of some pattern or idiom. Some chords such as fully diminished and augmented chords will have choice of spelling influenced by these patterns. The reason these exist goes back to the first purpose: that what the composer writes will be understandable to the performer. Also these grammar rules help make the whole system work smoothly.

So now we come to our student who is learning about these chords for the first time: and I was such a student recently, and am still learning. We can give a one-and-only spelling to an augmented or diminished chord: stacked thirds, skipped letters, etc. The danger is that the student will then think that this is how such a chord will always present itself.

The question becomes: what do you teach when and for what reason? There is no single answer. Personally I would want to start with "what it is": the sound and the pure intervals. Then I would want the student to see that different spellings are possible for this "sound" - choosing Ab or G# enharmonically. And then for the student to know as a general idea that he will encounter different spellings which are due to grammar and practical considerations. This sets the student up for a general idea as a starting point. The rest then comes as the student encounters these chords in music, and either discovers their spellings, or they are pointed out.

Here my interest is in the practical world of performer and composer. I don't see much point in analysis for the sake of analysis, and so as a specialization it's not something I'm into. The same goes for theorizing.

Your overview of the various ways these chords can be seen and spelled seem spot on.


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#1957646 - 09/11/12 09:25 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: keystring]
JamesPlaysPiano Offline
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Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 125
Hey, keystring.

Actually, this distinction varies according to the source. However, I'd be the first to admit that your definition is more commonly found and accepted. Thanks for reminding me, as I don't want the article to create any undue controversy. I just amended it.

James
_________________________
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Facebook groups: Jazz Piano Chat • Blues Piano Chat • Pop Piano Chat

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#1957657 - 09/11/12 10:15 PM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12576
Loc: Canada
I found at last week and thought if it was a common definition you might want to put it into your article. You certainly put a lot of time in, and given an extensive overview. smile

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#1957700 - 09/11/12 11:57 PM How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: JamesPlaysPiano]
LoPresti Offline
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Registered: 12/07/10
Posts: 1304
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: keystring
James, you might want to add to your definition that in root position, a triad must skip letter names. We get the same sound with CEbG and CD#G but only the first is a triad even though they are both "three letter chords". Here we get into spelling and grammar of written notation.


Originally Posted By: JamesPlaysPiano
Actually, this distinction varies according to the source. However, I'd be the first to admit that your definition is more commonly found and accepted.


Most theoreticians would state this a little differently. β€œAll triads are composed of a root, a third, and a fifth. The nature of the third and the fifth define the type of triad.”
_________________________
In music, everything one does correctly helps everything else.

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#1957719 - 09/12/12 02:31 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: LoPresti]
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12576
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: LoPresti


Most theoreticians would state this a little differently. β€œAll triads are composed of a root, a third, and a fifth. The nature of the third and the fifth define the type of triad.”

I would want to make very sure that the concept of root, third and fifth are understood. Books teaching concepts - at least well written ones - will give examples and have exercises. Understanding the second sentence involves working with the material which I think comes first. The definition itself is a good summary.

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#1957727 - 09/12/12 03:39 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: PianoStudent88]
Tech 5 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/12
Posts: 194
Loc: South Carolina
Originally Posted By: PianoStudent88
I left out one more little bit: on the chart of chords,

The first column is the root: the note the chord is built on

The second column, labeled "Major", is the major triad.

The third column, labeled "m", is the minor triad.

The fourth column, labeled "+", is the augmented triad.


Thanks! You've provided very helpful information. Some of this stuff is beginning to make sense. I really appreciate all your help.
_________________________
Virginia

"Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do."
J.Wooden

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#1957732 - 09/12/12 04:02 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: LoPresti]
Tech 5 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/12
Posts: 194
Loc: South Carolina




(Poor Virginia . . .)
Ed
[/quote]

Why I'm I referred to as "poor Virginia?" Does this mean I have too far to go before I can really play the piano as it was intended to be played?
_________________________
Virginia

"Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do."
J.Wooden

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#1957739 - 09/12/12 05:21 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
dire tonic Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/17/11
Posts: 2385
Loc: uk south
Originally Posted By: Tech 5

Why I'm I referred to as "poor Virginia?"


Information overload IMHO.

Originally Posted By: Tech 5

Does this mean I have too far to go before I can really play the piano as it was intended to be played?


Don’t give that a moment's consideration. There are so many different ways of playing the piano and enjoying the music you can make with it.

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#1957741 - 09/12/12 05:26 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Bob Newbie]
dire tonic Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/17/11
Posts: 2385
Loc: uk south
Originally Posted By: Bob Newbie
It would be beneficial if lead sheets indicated which inversion of a chord should be used
(1st 2nd or 3rd) in the chord symbol..unfortunately they don't..leaving it to the player to figure it out.


Slash chords, where the writer has included them, can help.
e.g G/B (first inversion)

-that said, the denominator usually refers to the bass.

Beyond that, there are two frequently employed conventions regarding inversion where accompaniment is concerned.

i) it occupies a register on the instrument which doesn't dominate, or interfere with, the lead voice.

ii) inversions are chosen which minimise movement. A simple example:-

C to G triads; play C root position, G first inversion.
(there are 2 other options).

- this was referred to as 'slithering' on the Chopin prelude thread (seemingly a dark art) but it's quite common in modern pop accompaniment (RH) and very common in jazz (LH during improvisation). IOW, the 'best' inversion is determined by the context of the chord in relation to its neighbours.

It's not a universal and sometimes an accompaniment will need to break out in order to draw attention to itself.

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#1957783 - 09/12/12 10:08 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
Bob Newbie Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/02/06
Posts: 1555
Or a small font 1,2 or 3 above the chord symbol would be sufficent.. smile

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#1957804 - 09/12/12 11:04 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
jotur Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 6032
Loc: Santa Fe, NM
Go Virginia! You're doing/will do great smile

I think you're picking up lots of good stuff from this thread, from what I can tell.

dire tonic's post describes the way I started playing chords in the left hand - what's the easiest thing to do next?!? It's been a good guide for years now, and now I have some variations, too.

Cathy
_________________________
Cathy

Practice like you are the worst; play like you are the best - anonymous

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#1957828 - 09/12/12 11:50 AM Re: How to read chords on sheet music? [Re: Tech 5]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4526
Loc: San Jose, CA
"Poor" Virginia? Oh, I don't know about that.

One good thing about PW is that, every so often, people who really know something will turn on the lights for the rest of us. It does not happen every day, but it can be worth slogging through a lot of dross to get there.

I was looking through the offerings on Amazon, to see if there was something I could suggest for you (or myself). It's such a problem with these 'virtual books,' not being able to see or glance through them. Still, it was not long before my head was spinning and my purse was screaming for mercy. It is a familiar sensation with such a big subject. I say, absorb what you can as it makes sense to you. We always find ourselves returning to the important subjects; I don't think we ever harvest the whole field in the first pass.
_________________________
Clef


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