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#1965811 - 09/28/12 02:16 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Here are some mainstream wood densities where not all types or exotics are listed.
But this will give a general idea of the difference of using wood Vs stone for a bridge of a piano:

Wood - seasoned & dry kg/cu.m
Afromosia 705
Apple 660 - 830
Ash, black 540
Ash, white 670
Aspen 420
Balsa 170
Bamboo 300 - 400
Birch (British) 670
Cedar, red 380
Cypress 510
Douglas Fir 530
Ebony 960 - 1120
Elm ( English ) 600
Elm ( Wych ) 690
Elm ( Rock ) 815
Iroko 655
Larch 590
Lignum Vitae 1280 - 1370
Mahogany ( Honduras ) 545
Mahogany ( African ) 495 - 850
Maple 755
Oak 590 - 930
Pine ( Oregon ) 530
Pine ( Parana ) 560
Pine ( Canadian ) 350 - 560
Pine ( Red ) 370 - 660
Redwood ( American ) 450
Redwood ( European ) 510
Spruce ( Canadian ) 450
Spruce ( Sitka ) 450
Sycamore 590
Teak 630 - 720
Willow 420
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1965819 - 09/28/12 02:28 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
The rock densities in the table below are expressed as specific gravity, which is the density of the rock relative to the density of water. That's not as strange as you may think, because water's density is 1 gram per cubic centimeter or 1 g/cm3. So these numbers translate directly to g/cm3, or tonnes per cubic meter (t/m3). As you can see, rocks of the same type can have any density in a range of densities, since they can contain different proportions of minerals and voids.
Rock densities are useful to engineers, of course. But they're also essential for geophysicists who must model the rocks of the Earth's crust for calculations of local gravity.

Rock density is very sensitive to the minerals that compose a particular rock type. Sedimentary rocks (and granite), which are rich in quartz and feldspar, tend to be less dense than volcanic rocks. And if you know your igneous petrology, you'll see that the more mafic a rock is, the greater its density.

Andesite 2.5 - 2.8
Basalt 2.8 - 3.0
Coal 1.1 - 1.4
Diabase 2.6 - 3.0
Diorite 2.8 - 3.0
Dolomite 2.8 - 2.9
Gabbro 2.7 - 3.3
Gneiss 2.6 - 2.9
Granite 2.6 - 2.7
Gypsum 2.3 - 2.8
Limestone 2.3 - 2.7
Marble 2.4 - 2.7
Mica schist 2.5 - 2.9
Peridotite 3.1 - 3.4
Quartzite 2.6 - 2.8
Rhyolite 2.4 - 2.6
Rock salt 2.5 - 2.6
Sandstone 2.2 - 2.8
Shale 2.4 - 2.8
Slate 2.7 - 2.8
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Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1965826 - 09/28/12 02:41 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Roger Ransom Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/19/05
Posts: 1241
Loc: SouthWest Michigan
Originally Posted By: Robert Di Santo
Roger ,

New age you say?.. This is not the forefront of my technology but interesting to see the relativity.

References to concepts analogous to the qi taken to be the life-process or flow of energy that sustains living beings are found in many belief systems, especially in Asia.

Philosophical conceptions of qi from the earliest records of Chinese philosophy (5th century BCE) correspond to Western notions of humours and the ancient Hindu yogic concept of prana, meaning "life force" in Sanskrit.

The earliest description of "force" in the current sense of vital energy is found in the Vedas of ancient India (circa 1500–1000 BCE),[7] and from the writings of the Chinese philosopher Mencius (4th century BCE).


New age or whatever, I choose to call it 'new age'. Call it what you like, it is not science and has no place in a technical discussion.

I realize many of your points are not 'new age' and may be valid. My advice is to leave the 'new age' out of your descriptions if you want to be taken seriously.
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#1965886 - 09/28/12 04:51 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
I have a question for all the technicians in this forum:

On a percentage basis, when the hammer hits the string(s) how much signal loss or (energy) occurs before the signal(s) gets to the soundboard on a wood bridge piano?
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Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966019 - 09/29/12 01:02 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Supply Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 3919
Loc: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
Sorry, I can't answer that one.
But I am very interested in how the addition of extra dampers was implemented. In most grands there seems to be impossibly little room to add any dampers in the standard configuration. Are there any pictures showing the additional dampers and how they are designed?
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#1966027 - 09/29/12 01:38 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
OperaTenor Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/13/06
Posts: 2379
Loc: Sandy Eggo, California
Originally Posted By: Robert Di Santo
Per the Density/specific Gravity: Basalt solid is @ 3011 Kg/cu - cm where granite is @ 2691 Kg/cu - cm

Example maple wood is 755Kg/cu - m

The properties of basalt isn't preferred for this use based on the mineral composition.


That doesn't make any sense. Logic would dictate, based on what you're doing, that higher density would give you more return.
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#1966028 - 09/29/12 01:47 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Dave B Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 1903
Loc: Philadelphia area
Robert, You keep referring to "My Invention". I don't understand, what did you invent? Simply trying a different material on a 200 yr old design and trying to explain why you think it sounds better doesn't make you Thomas Edison.

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#1966032 - 09/29/12 02:08 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: OperaTenor]
Withindale Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/09/11
Posts: 1923
Loc: Suffolk, England
Originally Posted By: OperaTenor
Originally Posted By: Robert Di Santo
Per the Density/specific Gravity: Basalt solid is @ 3011 Kg/cu - cm where granite is @ 2691 Kg/cu - cm

Example maple wood is 755Kg/cu - m

The properties of basalt isn't preferred for this use based on the mineral composition.


That doesn't make any sense. Logic would dictate, based on what you're doing, that higher density would give you more return.


Jim, you seem to have missed Robert's point that the crystalline structure of granite is much to be preferred for physical and metaphysical reasons that Robert has expounded at some length.

There are different types of granite and the type chosen for bridges will need to be carefully selected following the results of the exhaustive Research and Development in progress. That programme should of course include other suitable minerals if only to rule them out.

It would be most unfortunate for someone else to come along with a better natural or composite material just as the granite bridge hits the market.

To my ears the defining characteristic of the recordings is an excruciatingly shrill piercing sound that reminds me of recordings of certain well-known sopranos that I have never been able to stand for some reason. I also hear a "metal on stone" quality in the sound, reminiscent of a mason's chisel.

These unfortunate side effects could potentially be mollified by using agraffes as described in Richard Dain's patents which I mentioned in an earlier post.


Edited by Withindale (09/29/12 05:14 AM)
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Schiedmayer & Soehne, 1925 Model 14, 55" upright
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#1966103 - 09/29/12 07:54 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Supply,

Daniel Koehler owner of Naples Piano Company did the tedious work. Dan is the professional knowing of all functions of the piano I use as reference.
You could call him If you'd like @ 239.404.8007.
He would be more than glad to appease your interests and since Dan did the work I wouldn't share the fruits of his labor without his approval.


Edited by Robert Di Santo (09/29/12 08:47 AM)
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966108 - 09/29/12 08:08 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
OperaTenor,

That doesn't make any sense. Logic would dictate, based on what you're doing, that higher density would give you more return.

ANSWER: Basalt doesn't have the complete mixture of minerals needed for my invention.

The chosen granite I use has the properties I'm looking for even tho I would use Quartzite which has a much higher percentage of quartz than the stone I use @ present and is as hard as basalt and yet has a much better looking matrix.

Logically speaking, in order to conclude all of my tests to be accurate I have to stick with the granite I started with otherwise the tests are not accurate wink once satisfied with the conclusions, then I will venture into other densities to see what is best for which register. No different than wood bridges consisting of multiple densities for each specific register..
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966121 - 09/29/12 08:44 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Dave B,

My invention refers to exactly that. I currently hold 2 international guitar patents in which I've produced 23 prototypes 7 of my own models.

I currently hold 3 International trademarks for my company: Stonetone®

1) mark for the name Stonetone®
2) mark for the artwork the name represents.
3) mark For the tag line, Music Of The Earth®

Early spring 2013 I will also hold another International patent on the piano application that's pending until such time.

And several more patents to come for the other stringed instruments within the next 5 yrs, while any of my patents can be extended if any additional technology is produced another file can be submitted under a CIP = [continuation in part], or filing a trademark will protect that entity for ever as long as the maintenance fees stay paid smile

That makes me an innovator in the (stringed instrument industry) again related to "MY INVENTION(S)".


Lets start with the US Patent Office definition of patent.

"A patent for an invention is the grant of a property right to the inventor, issued by the Patent and Trademark Office. The term of a new patent is 20 years from the date on which the application for the patent was filed in the United States or, in special cases, from the date an earlier related application was filed, subject to the payment of maintenance fees. US patent grants are effective only within the US, US territories, and US possessions.
The right conferred by the patent grant is, in the language of the statute and of the grant itself, “the right to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling” the invention in the United States or “importing” the invention into the United States. What is granted is not the right to make, use, offer for sale, sell or import, but the right to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, selling or importing the invention."

So a patent is a property right. That idea for that comes all the way back from the original constitution. That right was granted by the U.S. government to an inventor to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the U.S. or importing the invention into the U.S.

Included in this definition of patent is the notion of a limited monopoly. For a defined period of time. In return for that right, the inventor must provide a public disclosure of the invention in the form of the issued patent. Although many people view patents as something that impedes the spread of technology the intent is exactly the opposite. The patent has to completely describe the technology to enable others to copy it - after the period of limited monopoly is over. You can see that intent also in the maintenance fee framework of patents, in which the patent owner has to pay an escalating series of maintenance fees over time - which actually encourages inventors to give up the patent to the public unless they are using it.


Edited by Robert Di Santo (09/29/12 11:11 AM)
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966126 - 09/29/12 09:04 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
The ANSWER to the question I asked prior is between 15% to 30% of the string dynamic due to the wood bridge performance, besides the waveforms conflicting the optimum performance side to side as well as vertically to the soundboard. This calculation doesn't apply to all 88 keys wink There are several variations.. We can control the attack & decay based on the design and amount of the preferred transducer used.


Edited by Robert Di Santo (09/29/12 09:05 AM)
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966244 - 09/29/12 01:22 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Now all of you can see the cymascope images that they call cymaglifs " Music Made Visible "

This scientific fact should suffice.

Enlarge for better viewing.

http://youtu.be/rQx_nieKBYY


Edited by Robert Di Santo (09/29/12 01:51 PM)
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966287 - 09/29/12 02:38 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3320
Originally Posted By: Robert Di Santo
Now all of you can see the cymascope images that they call cymaglifs " Music Made Visible "

This scientific fact should suffice.

Enlarge for better viewing.

http://youtu.be/rQx_nieKBYY


No one is disputing that the StoneTone bridge has a cleaner, more sustained sound compared to conventional bridges. This video doesn't prove how or why this occurs; it only shows that it occurs. For technicians, this visual representation isn't very useful IMO because we can hear what's happening.
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M.Mus. Piano Performance & Literature 2011
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#1966310 - 09/29/12 03:18 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Loren D Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/22/10
Posts: 2546
Loc: PA
I've been following this thread with interest, though quietly.

My thoughts: Let the product hit the market. If it's a good invention, it will speak for itself. If it's not a good invention, no amount of hype will make it one.
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#1966325 - 09/29/12 03:33 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: beethoven986]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
I posted the the cymaglifs to show the partials and that's it, nothing more.
Thank you for your observation Beethoven986.


Edited by Robert Di Santo (09/29/12 03:47 PM)
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966328 - 09/29/12 03:44 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Hello Loren,

This technology is far from hype in other words, folks such as Thomas Zoells and Dr. Richard Bosworths clarifications and dozens of other folks are privy to this process have all agreed on a very limited test basis that this process is valid and innovative.

As we further this effort in to much better quality pianos to see the significance in improvement with better comparisons since we have certainly validated this concept with the pianos completed thus far..

Anything we can do to improve the quality and or performance of the acoustic piano is our goal.

Our motto defines team as such: Together Everyone Achieves More.

Thank you for your input.


Edited by Robert Di Santo (09/29/12 03:50 PM)
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Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966335 - 09/29/12 03:51 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: beethoven986]
Withindale Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/09/11
Posts: 1923
Loc: Suffolk, England
Originally Posted By: beethoven986
Originally Posted By: Robert Di Santo

No one is disputing that the StoneTone bridge has a cleaner, more sustained sound compared to conventional bridges. This video doesn't prove how or why this occurs; it only shows that it occurs. For technicians, this visual representation isn't very useful IMO because we can hear what's happening.


B986,

On the basis of this video I wouldn't say the Story & Clark and Baldwin pianos with granite bridges have a cleaner, more sustained sound than the other pianos, especially the Bosendorfer and Fazioli. It would be interesting to see the attack and decay plots over time.

What was surprising to me was the very marked differences in sound between the pianos. Do you think recording was a factor or are they representative in your experience?
_________________________
Ian Russell
Schiedmayer & Soehne, 1925 Model 14, 55" upright
Ibach, 1922 49" upright (project piano)

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#1966388 - 09/29/12 05:00 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Withindale]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3320
Originally Posted By: Withindale


B986,

On the basis of this video I wouldn't say the Story & Clark and Baldwin pianos with granite bridges have a cleaner, more sustained sound than the other pianos, especially the Bosendorfer and Fazioli. It would be interesting to see the attack and decay plots over time.


I would. The Baldwin and Steinway concert grands sound especially "dirty" but it's impossible to say from this video whether that's due to slightly mistuned unisons, false beats, or a combination of both... my guess is probably a bit of both. The Bosendorfer sounds much cleaner, but still not like the Fazioli, Baldwin ST, or Hallet ST (and the decay profile is very different). To me, it's a night and day difference between the ST pianos and the conventional ones, but this does not mean I endorse the product (I'm in the Phoenix camp).

Originally Posted By: Withindale
What was surprising to me was the very marked differences in sound between the pianos. Do you think recording was a factor or are they representative in your experience?


Every piano is going to sound different, and the ones tested are all very different in terms of design, build quality, and age. I think the recording of the Hallet is representative of what I heard in person.
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M.Mus. Piano Performance & Literature 2011
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#1966455 - 09/29/12 06:28 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: beethoven986]
jim ialeggio Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 599
Loc: shirley, MA
986,

Sounds like you heard/played this instrument.

Mass loading of the bass in a standard belly muffles and deadens the 1st 2 octaves, at least in my experiments. Manufactures who are paying attention will go to lengths to keep the mass down back there. Listening to the Youtube clip of the granite bridge, the bass seemed to have been sacrificed for the treble, as it was not at all satisfactory to my ears. True its an entry level piano, so maybe it sounded lousy before the modification...but my small bellies sound quite nice down there, so I don't want to assume what I take as a low frequency tonal deficiency is a small belly issue.

What was your take on the bass tone?

Jim Ialeggio
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www.grandpianosolutions.com
advanced soundboard and action redesigns
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#1966489 - 09/29/12 07:37 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: beethoven986]
Withindale Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/09/11
Posts: 1923
Loc: Suffolk, England
986,
Originally Posted By: beethoven986
I would. The Baldwin and Steinway concert grands sound especially "dirty" but it's impossible to say from this video whether that's due to slightly mistuned unisons, false beats, or a combination of both... my guess is probably a bit of both. The Bosendorfer sounds much cleaner, but still not like the Fazioli, Baldwin ST, or Hallet ST (and the decay profile is very different). To me, it's a night and day difference between the ST pianos and the conventional ones, but this does not mean I endorse the product (I'm in the Phoenix camp).


B986,

You have a more discerning ear than mine! I can hear a "night and day" difference when comparing the treble sustain in my piano with the videos of instruments with granite bridges, but not at middle C#.

Maybe pianos to come will have better treble sustain as a result of improved bridges, or the Phoenix and weighting approaches you have mentioned.


Edited by Withindale (09/30/12 03:14 AM)
_________________________
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Schiedmayer & Soehne, 1925 Model 14, 55" upright
Ibach, 1922 49" upright (project piano)

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#1966498 - 09/29/12 07:54 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Dave B Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 1903
Loc: Philadelphia area
Robert, I guess it's time to wait and see what happens. This thread is overdone and all I can do is wish you the best of luck.

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#1966505 - 09/29/12 08:05 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: jim ialeggio]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3320
Originally Posted By: jim ialeggio
986,

Sounds like you heard/played this instrument.... What was your take on the bass tone?

Jim Ialeggio



I just sent you a PM.
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#1966691 - 09/30/12 07:56 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States

New Engineering Concepts on Sound Production
presented by the Piano Technicians Guild, Chicago Chapter


PianoForte Salon, 410 S. Michigan Ave., Studio 825
Open to the public

Stonetone® Music, Inc. has launched a revolutionary new concept in piano design, allowing for greater clarity of sound, sustain and register integration of the entire keyboard range. This is achieved by the direct and efficient transference of string vibrations through granite bridges to the soundboard.

Thomas Zoells president of Pianoforte Chicago has made this piano available for Artists, Technicians and anyone one who would like to play this prototype and witness this technology "hands on" this piano can be observed on the 3rd floor of the pianoforte establishment.


www.pianofortefoundation.org

©2012 PianoForte Foundation | 408 S. Michigan Ave. | Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.291.0291

I would like to thank all the folks here and throughout the piano forum who acknowledged and/or participated on this topic post or non post.
We will post further results as they arrive.
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Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1966707 - 09/30/12 09:23 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Minnesota Marty Offline

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7239
Loc: Rochester MN
What is the date and time of the PTG presentation?
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Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

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#1966836 - 09/30/12 01:59 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Dave B Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 1903
Loc: Philadelphia area
Marty, Can you contact the PTG Chicago chapter for more info? I'm not a PTG member.

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#1966838 - 09/30/12 02:02 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Minnesota Marty Offline

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7239
Loc: Rochester MN
Dave,

It wasn't directed to you. It was in the posting from R. D'S and I was asking him.
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Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

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#1966847 - 09/30/12 02:30 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Minnesota Marty]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3320
Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
Dave,

It wasn't directed to you. It was in the posting from R. D'S and I was asking him.


It was two Tuesdays ago.
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#1968574 - 10/04/12 08:27 AM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Page 3 of the Wippenpost October issue. Chicago Chapter PTG

REVIEW of the SEPTEMBER
CHAPTER MEETING
by Jeff Cappelli, RPT


Dr Richard Bosworth (long ago a classmate at IU) and
Robert DiSanto of Stone Tone Music, came to Chicago
to show off Mr DiSanto’s solid granite treble bridge and
granite-capped bass bridge, which he installed on a Story
and Clark production piano. Thomas Zoells acted as host
at his beautiful Pianoforte Salon in the Fine Arts Building,
where Dr Bosworth drew interesting tonal comparisons
between a new Shigeru Kawai 7’6” grand and a production
model Story and Clark small grand, modified with the new
bridge material.


It was quite clear that for the Story and Clark, the before
and after samplings (the former recorded) were of vastly
different sound qualities—the latter being more in focus,
with greater sustain. The granite bridge did produce a
lovely, clear sound at lower dynamic levels. Mr DiSanto
commented that the project will require further R&D.


Many questions arose during the evening about how the
mass of the bridges and the sensitive nature of the piano
soundboard might coexist over long periods of time. This
made for energized conversation, with interesting
observations and comments from several of the
technicians present.


Future innovation is essential in all industries and we are
delighted to have had the opportunity to visit with these
two—now pioneers in piano technology. As this is the
beginning of their journey, there will undoubtedly be more
discovery and developments in the future. Perhaps one
day we will see more modifications intended to transfer
energy as efficiently as possible to the soundboard—and to
our curious, waiting ears.

Jeff
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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#1982203 - 11/03/12 01:11 PM Re: New Engineering concepts on Piano Sound production [Re: Robert Di Santo]
Robert Di Santo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 92
Loc: United States
Hello Folks,
I am posting Novembers issue of the Slippery Rock Gazettes follow up article of Our presentation @ the Fine Arts Bldg. Chicago Sept. 18th.
Some pictures are available on the article itself.
We have some wonderful advancements to share soon 2013.




At Stonetone Music, the Granite Speaks for Itself

Stacy B. Williams

Special Correspondent

The Slippery Rock recently caught up with stone mason and inventor Robert DiSanto and pianist Dr. Richard Bosworth of Stonetone® Music, Inc. in Naples, Florida.

They have been quite busy over the last year and a half, but have made significant progress in the research phase of their granite piano bridge prototype.

This means they have been asking a lot of questions.

Being the meticulous artists that they are, Stonetone® is strategically making headway into the piano industry one question at a time. Although the experimental process is still in its inception, the response to the Stonetone® modified pianos has been overwhelmingly positive.

The two prototypes have performed extremely well in two recent experiments: one for a live audience of piano technicians and one for a Cymascope, an impressive scientific instrument that creates images of sound waves.

In September, DiSanto and Bosworth had an in-depth meeting with some of the top piano technicians in the Midwest at the PianoForte Foundation in Chicago. Their second prototype, the Story and Clark baby grand, was the showcase piece at the presentation. After three and a half weeks on the road from Naples, the Story and Clark finally arrived in Chicago ready for its debut.

“I think it stopped in every major city along the way and it didn’t go out of tune!” exclaimed DiSanto.

Thomas Zoells, Founder and Executive Director of the PianoForte Chicago, said the meeting was “a lively one with many questions.” It was an important learning experience for everyone involved.

After the presentation, many of the audience members (some of whom are pianists turned technicians) had the opportunity to test the entry-level Story and Clark against a handmade 7 1/2-foot Shigeru Kawai, known in the industry as a luxury piano. DiSanto said that this comparison was not ideal because it was like comparing a Corvette and a Pinto, but the difference was still incredibly pronounced.

“There were a lot of wide eyes,” said Bosworth, “It was just one Kodak moment after another.”

Piano tuner and technician Daniel Koehler, agrees, along with his colleagues, that granite bridges are superior in their sustaining quality. What the granite bridge can do for the piano sound pattern is the key to its success.

DiSanto explains that the sound pattern of wood bridges is attack, decay, sustain, release (ADSR). But with a granite bridge, the pattern becomes attack, sustain, decay, release (ASDR). So by sustaining the initial attack of the notes in a chord, one is able to hear all the tones for the same length of time rather than the treble range dying out first.

“The finest pianos have this laser-beam kind of tone, with a clean crisp sound, much like a vocal, dolce sweet quality,” says Bosworth, an acclaimed pianist.

StoneTone®’s exciting mission to create this kind of tone by using a modified granite bridge has passed several tests with flying colors, (specifically a purple hue) as seen in a Cymascope test (see photo).

They commissioned this Cymascope test with six different piano samples: four of them with wood bridges and StoneTone®’s two prototypes.

The Cymascope still image of the middle C-sharp note on the Story and Clark looks like a pretty fractal, but it actually represents all the harmonic overtones associated with that string as shown by the sustainability of the note.

The outer edges of the imprint express the principal sounding tone (middle C-sharp) and the center shapes express the overtone series (secondary pitches vibrating in fractional ratios, which add the color to the sound), DiSanto explains. Therefore, the granite is capable not only of sustaining the note, but it also allows the “full bouquet” to be heard more clearly.

Stonetone® deservedly feels confident moving forward as they are able to hear and scientifically see the difference between the traditional wood bridge and their granite bridge. There are numerous advantages to the increased presence of partial tones in each key, allowing more intricate pieces like polyphonic music to be heard in a refined manner.

Polyphonic music is composed of several independent voices or instruments constructed in a simultaneous manner. Johann Sebastian Bach is famous for these polyphonic compositions, and with a modified granite bridge, people may actually be able to hear them as they were written.

Bosworth admits that he has become more interested in playing polyphonic pieces on the Stonetone® prototypes because of the multilayered sound quality.

“Think of it like a can of worms… you follow one worm and there’s another one on top of that one,” says Bosworth, “so you hear these different musical lines, where one is going and you can hear another one underneath it, and all these subtleties of how the different tones relate to each other.”

The research team will continue to use volcano absolute black granite in their prototypes until, by process of elimination, they can conclude what the most superior granite may be for sustaining sound quality in the test pianos. Absolute black granite, with its amazing strength and high level of density, is an ideal benchmark because of its unalterable qualities.

“Whether I purchased a slab today or forty years from now, it would still be the consistent mineral that it is,” says DiSanto.

DiSanto knows a thing or two about stone, but Stonetone® is interested in networking with experts across related fields. He has been in communication with Dr. Stanley Starr and Dr. Robert Youngquist of the NASA Kennedy Space Center about the energy of sound and its relationship to stone.

Both experts (a physicist and a geologist, respectively) agree that granite is the best transducer to get the string energy to the soundboard, which is the amplifier of the instrument, says DiSanto. Youngquist and Starr have been encouraging of the Stonetone® technology.

Moving forward, Stonetone® agrees that one of the biggest challenges will be re-educating the public on the preconceptions of what is an optimal musical material and why. Traditionally, the piano maker’s mantra is “If it’s not wood, it’s not good.” And as StoneTone’s concept development continues to defy that statement, they may also want to prove to the stone industry that granite is ideal for sound.

If any people are prepared to tackle this project, it is the team of DiSanto (inventor), Bosworth (media relations and performer) and Koehler (piano technician). Their combined expertise and passion for stone, music and mechanics creates the perfect recipe for this musical mission.

At this point, a myriad of possibilities await the Stonetone® crew, and they all agree there is a long process of elimination ahead.

“That’s where the exciting part comes in, because there’s a lot to discover,” says DiSanto.

As for the modified Story and Clark piano, it will sit humbly on display in Chicago waiting for someone to play its keys. After all the questions that have been posed, the granite continues to speak for itself.

Zoells has shown the Stonetone® modified Story and Clark to select pianists and technicians. Soon the piano will be moved to the main showroom next to a similar entry-level wood bridge piano to order to truly exhibit the differences. The Stonetone® modified piano will stay on display at the PianoForte Foundation until February 2013.

Zoells believes that with a little more research and development to refine the granite bridge design in a higher quality piano, it is likely that manufacturers could adopt this technology to enhance their pianos.

“What effect it might have on high quality pianos remains to be seen,” says Zoells.

Like the strings of the Stonetone® modified Story and Clark, I guess we’ll just stay tuned.

For more information, contact Dr. Richard Bosworth, Media Relations for Stonetone® Music, Inc. at richard@richardbosworth.org or 239-919-6414.

Watch the Cymascope middle C-sharp test on www.youtube.com
_________________________
Robert B. Di Santo
StoneTone®
Music of the earth®

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