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#1968427 - 10/03/12 09:12 PM Repertoire - to maintain or not??
CebuKid Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1176
Due to this year's slacking, my meager "repertoire" is in sad shape, and I completely forgot 2 very nice pieces that I originally had intended to keep.

However, I've told myself not to get too upset about it, and even viewed my YouTube videos as validation (and nostalgia..lol) - to somehow convince myself that I've played these pieces in my lifetime and have a video record to prove it!! Further, I was pleased with both these performances...doing them over, I find, will just hold me back from learning new things. The only thing I'm bummed about is not being able to play these just to "entertain myself."

I know lots of you throw your pieces away once they've been performed, and I also know a lot of you keep and maintain some of your pieces. One personal criteria I have is maintaining my "crowd pleaser pieces"...for me, they're Joplin's Entertainer and Maple Leaf, of course.

This thread is not really intended to be a poll, but just an open discussion. smile What's your own personal criteria for what you keep, etc...?? For those of you who *don't* keep pieces, what's your rationale for this? I know lots of pianists (pro and amateur) keep pieces around for their lifetime and find their interpretations changing or learning something new about it, etc...this video comes to mind:

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#1968438 - 10/03/12 09:34 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
pianonewb Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/01/09
Posts: 220
Loc: No. Va.
For me, it depends. I am the piano player for my church, so those hymns that I know I will keep, and try to add more, because you can never have enough to keep things fresh.
With my personal repertoire, I keep only those that I like, or that I have recieved a good response from when played live.
If I drop anything, it is because it wasn't recieved well, I don't do it well enough and have spent too much time on it already( gotta know your limitations), or I simply do not like it or am tired of it.
However, if I drop anything, I make sure that I have added something else to take it's place. Preferably a couple. I want my repertoire to grow, not shrink.
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Casio Privia PX 120

The only thing nescessary for evil to thrive is for good men to do nothing.


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#1968463 - 10/03/12 11:13 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Mark... Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/27/06
Posts: 4379
Loc: Jersey Shore
My recordings (good or bad) give me great satisfaction and allows me to move to other pieces. It's like they are saved in stone,,,

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#1968466 - 10/03/12 11:26 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17778
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
The pieces I like to play the most are the ones I keep in repertoire, which is rather self-evident, I guess. Pieces that I found particularly frustrating to get to recording-ready status are the first ones to go, e.g., the ones that I try take after take to get a version that's free of major bloopers. Right now, for example, I'm preparing Glass's "Opening No. 1" for recording, and once I get that 3-against-2 nightmare recorded, I don't think I'll ever play that sucker again. mad

However, there have been times I've suddenly thought of a piece that I loved that I haven't played in a while, and I've been distressed to discover that I no longer have it memorized. It's happened enough that I've thought I should create a "permanent repertoire" list and make sure that I play through all the pieces on it at least once per week. It's clear that I can't trust my idle memory to do the job.
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#1968488 - 10/04/12 12:49 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: Monica K.]
outo Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/02/12
Posts: 696
Loc: Finland
I have struggled with this thing a lot. I would like to keep EVERY piece that I enjoy as music and since I can pick my own pieces that's most of them. Even the classical sonatinas that I don't really care for I hate to leave because they usually have been such a pain to learn...

But this attitude is giving me too much trouble because trying to keep everything is impossible so I have started teaching myself to let go. I tell myself that I can get back to them later and they will be much easier to relearn when I have advanced... But it's still difficult, I guess I'm a hoarder frown

At the moment I have two Scarlatti sonatas that I want to keep forever and of course the Chopin preludes when I am finished with them. Other current stuff I think I can live without...barely smile

EDIT: Forgot the short pieces by César Franck. The are so enjoyable to play that I think I'll keep most of them too.


Edited by outo (10/04/12 12:57 AM)

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#1968491 - 10/04/12 12:59 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
jotur Online   blank
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 5539
Loc: Santa Fe, NM
Well, I recently picked up a twice-a-month gig at the same place, an hour each time. That takes 18-20 tunes each time. So even if I have 40 pieces memorized that's not enough to keep things from getting stale.

So I'm adding pieces. I'm adding some really simple stuff - waltzes with oom-pah-pah's in the left hand, for instance, and fairly straight-forward traditional dance tunes - and maybe one more-sophisticated arrangement a month. But I have to work on the sophisticated ones maybe 3 months to get them presentable. So each month I move the fresh new ones to the "I'm working on these now that they're memorized" list, and the "memorized-have-been-worked-on" ones to "get them polished" and the "polished" to "okay, these are repertoire." It's a challenge laugh

And then I got a request. So I have two weeks to do something simple but not lame with Green Green Grass of Home.

I'm glad I don't play classical. I have no idea how people can memorize and keep those in repertoire. Dance tunes and old songs - yeah. Works for me.

Cathy
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#1968503 - 10/04/12 01:25 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: jotur]
outo Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/02/12
Posts: 696
Loc: Finland
Originally Posted By: jotur

I'm glad I don't play classical. I have no idea how people can memorize and keep those in repertoire. Dance tunes and old songs - yeah. Works for me.


That's funny, because for me it's the complete opposite. It seems I cannot memorize anything non classical on the piano although I can easily sing quite a few jazz standards and other songs anytime from memory. Maybe it has something to do with playing classical style as a kid. Even if I cannot consciously remember anything about that, maybe something about the structures of the classical stuff are hidden away deep in my brain...

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#1968539 - 10/04/12 02:35 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
As a beginner, I have worked through Fletcher piano book 1.

I play the tunes/exercises, a total of 62, until I can play them without hesitation and without wrong notes but musically. Nothing has been memorized because I have some brain difficulty there but reading the music is working well.

As I begin book 2 and ultimately to book 5 down the road, I realize I probably can't keep reviewing the whole of everything I have learned systematically daily. I enjoying learning new tunes and I equally also enjoy sitting down and playing all the tunes page by page up to what I have learned.

Any guidelines for someone at my early stage of piano playing/learning of what to keep playing and what to let go before my list is way too long to play at one time.

Thank you for any of your thoughts.

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#1968566 - 10/04/12 07:58 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
mom3gram Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/26/08
Posts: 1133
Loc: New Jersey
Michael 99 - Are you actually playing all 62 pieces every day?

I would pick 10 or 15, or even 20 of the ones you like best. (You can't love them all). If they are short enough, play them every day. Or you could make two playlists - and you could alternate List #1 and List #2 ever other day. This will give you more time to learn new pieces, while still having a "repertoire" of pieces that you know. As you progress, you can drop one of the older ones each time you add a new one. As the pieces get longer and more interesting, you will not mind dropping some of the older beginning ones. Of course, there may be some that you want to keep too.
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ALFRED'S ADULT BOOK 1 GRADUATE


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#1968572 - 10/04/12 08:21 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Andy Platt Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2392
Loc: Virginia, USA
I had such good intentions about maintaining my repertoire. They've gone nowhere though.

However, I am finding that it's easier to bring pieces back from the grave so I'm not so bothered. Plus my reading skills have developed enough that there's always something I can play if I want to get away from the pieces I'm learning.
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#1968575 - 10/04/12 08:27 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Peyton Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 2555
Loc: Maine
I'm at the point where I have forgotten more than I remember. I think it's the bane of just not being a good sight reader and relying so much on memory. I look back at some of the pieces that I slaved over for so long and now cannot play the first bar of and it's beyond frustrating. Then again, sometimes I'll sit down with a piece I haven't played in years, try to clear my mind and just think of the melody and let my hands take over. Good old muscle memory kicks in and for a few moments I feel reincarnated....
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#1968582 - 10/04/12 08:53 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: Peyton]
dmd Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/15/09
Posts: 1876
Loc: Pennsylvania
The comments here remind me of why I made the decision (after years of memorizing) to learn to play while looking at the notation. I am hoping that this will allow me to be able to retain many more pieces in at least passable playing condition. I still memorize portions of pieces when it helps me get through a particularly awkward passage but then my eyes return to the printed page. I relate it to sort of like saving my playing to a file on a harddrive instead of trying to keep all of it in memory.
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Current: ES7, Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 audio device, SennHeiser HD555 Phones, Focal CMS 40 Powered Monitors, Ravenscroft275, Ivory II American Concert D, Pianoteq 5

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#1968589 - 10/04/12 09:14 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Ganddalf Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 638
Loc: Norway
I have been playing for many years, mostly classical. I don't think it would be possible for me to keep everything I played as core repertoire. Some pieces I have left for years and then returned to. Presently I have started working on Bach's third Partita. I played this about 15 years ago, but when I started all over again I had the feeling that this was completely new stuff. After playing the movements a few times, however, I started remembering quite a lot. The job now is to train the fingers and get the music flowing.

I always try to keep a core repertoire of 1 - 2 hours duration at a level good enough for performing for an audience. This repertoire changes with time. Presently I play some Mendelssohn, Bach, Grieg and Chopin. I have, however, played quite a few sonatas of Haydn and Beethoven, and when time permits I hope to return to some of them.

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#1968594 - 10/04/12 09:30 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
jazzwee Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7096
Loc: So. California
Obviously, this thread is intended for the non-sightreader and truly it is frustrating not to be able to maintain a tune. Practically every classical piece I've done is now forgotten. I am a very poor sight-reader. Hopeless actually. Also, I just don't have the opportunity to play something that's non-jazz because I'm an active performer now.

In jazz though, I can pick up an old tune after a day or so of practice (just doing it by ear) and I can solo on anything if I can look at the leadsheet.

But I've been pleased lately that I've been able to play "free", meaning I've reached a stage where I can make up stuff now. I just sit on a piano and compose on the fly. Sadly, I cannot repeat whatever I do but it's a good feeling because in a solo piano situation, I could never "run out" of things to play.
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#1968629 - 10/04/12 10:48 AM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2395
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
When learning a new piece I work only on as much as I can memorise at a time so all my pieces are memorised by the time I can play them except those that are easy enough to read at a reasonable lick - pieces I can whip into shape faster than I can memorise them.

If I lose interest in a piece, which is rare, I drop it before finishing it. If I tire of a piece I play it less frequently.

I keep a journal and every piece I learn gets written in and reviewed periodically at increasing intervals. I never normally drop a piece once learnt and once it's in permanent memory I can recall it in a few days after several years away from the piano and only normally run through it for a few days every six months or so.

I was always a poor reader. I can't believe how well I'm doing since my recent return to the instrument and working through Guhl's Keyboard Proficiency.
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#1968678 - 10/04/12 12:55 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: dmd]
CebuKid Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1176
Originally Posted By: dmd
The comments here remind me of why I made the decision (after years of memorizing) to learn to play while looking at the notation. I am hoping that this will allow me to be able to retain many more pieces in at least passable playing condition. I still memorize portions of pieces when it helps me get through a particularly awkward passage but then my eyes return to the printed page. I relate it to sort of like saving my playing to a file on a harddrive instead of trying to keep all of it in memory.


Like yourself, I've been trying to get in the habit of following the score - even after something's been ingrained in muscle memory.

I'm still not that good at it either, and admittedly, I get pretty lazy at times and just memorize and look at my hands..lol. Shame on me!! I guess, it's because I work with no teacher. grin

The ability to "read and play", also depends on difficulty, for example I think Bach inventions are easier to read (not sight read, but play while reading) - than a Joplin piece which is intensive in octaves and left-hand leaps.

Lastly, I think those of us "cursed" with good memory/muscle memory end up with those same bad habits, whereas those who rely on the score are much better "reader-while-playing" types (often out of necessity). Teachers here have warned me about this in in past threads - that this method is unreliable and memory fades over time. They were right!
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Scott Joplin Repertoire


Music washes away from the soul
the dust of everyday life.
- Berthold Auerbach



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#1968714 - 10/04/12 01:58 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
outo Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/02/12
Posts: 696
Loc: Finland
I don't see memorizing or looking at your hands as bad habits. After all scores are hardly ever used by pianists when they perform and they look at their hands all the time. It is good to train sight reading and it's good to be able to play without looking at your hands (and it is a necessity when you cannot see them both) but I don't see them as the main goal. The main goal for me is to be able to play the piece with beautiful tone and musically. To really get into a piece of music and interpret it I feel it must be memorized, both mentally and in muscle memory.

Of course it is different story for those of you who have to play hours of material at request or new material given to them by others.

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#1968731 - 10/04/12 02:38 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Quarkomatic Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/16/10
Posts: 75
Loc: Toronto, ON, Canada
I have repertoire system that I think could work very well for some people, although so far it hasn't really worked for me! But I think someone with greater self-discipline could do it.

I keep binder of repertoire with photocopied sheets, so I don't have to search through books to find all the pieces, and I can easily play through a bunch of pieces in a row. I keep 32 pieces, organized in 4 categories, with colour-coded tabs each numbered 1 through 8. The categories can be whatever you like; mine are basically crowd pleasers, dramatic pieces, mellow pieces, and humourous pieces, but you might want to organize by tempo or more traditional genres like jazz, classical, etc. Every time I finish learning a piece, I decide if I want to keep it (often the answer is yes, as I continue to learn more challenging and musically interesting pieces), and then I select a category and a piece from that category that will be replaced. Currently I have fewer than 32, because a couple pieces occupy two spots in the list so that they get some extra practice.

The idea is to play 4 pieces each day by first taking all those numbered 1, then all the 2s, and so on. That way you get to play music from 4 different categories, so you won't get bored, and if you are practicing approximately daily, you'll play through all your repertoire in a little over a week.

It doesn't seem like much, but playing 4 pieces could take 10 to 25 minutes, depending on their length. And that's a lot of time if you only have an hour to practice. So I've found I haven't been able to keep it up. Once the pieces start falling out of memory, then it takes even longer to play them as there is temptation to repeat the tricky parts a few times for practice. I generally record all of my finished pieces for YouTube, but even in that I've fallen behind, and I have a number of pieces I'll need to re-learn if I am to record them.

Another suggestion I've heard is simply to choose one day of the week as repertoire day, say Sunday, and play through all your pieces then. That could be a challenge if you have a large repertoire though, and I hate to give up a practice day for the pieces I'm currently working on.

Anyway, you've inspired me to give my system another try! I'll probably need to ease into it though, perhaps starting by repeating group 1 pieces for a few days, then slowly adding the other groups into the mix until I'm playing the full 32 pieces again. It really would be nice to always have a selection of things I can play for friends and family, rather than just 1 or 2 pieces (if I'm lucky) that I'm currently working on.

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#1968738 - 10/04/12 03:13 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
Cookie74 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/29/06
Posts: 137
Loc: California
I am the worst at retaining repertoire. Once I'm done with something, I just go on to something else and never go back. I would like to, but then I can't move on to pieces that I want to learn. Some of the responses here have given me some ideas, and I think I need to pick out a few of the pieces that I loved and relearn them. I like the idea of keeping about an hour or two of repertoire in order to be able to perform it at a moments notice. I think I might do that.
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#1968740 - 10/04/12 03:21 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
jazzwee Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7096
Loc: So. California
The danger with an over-focus on repertoire is that "practice" is supposed to aim at improving something. Simply maintaining some piece doesn't improve your piano playing. It just helps your memory.

I personally would look for something to improve on on every piece, rather than just seek to memorize (kill two birds with one stone). This may mean the simpler pieces get ignored the most.

With this kind of mindset, it would not be surprising that after 10 years of playing, one suddenly realizes that a plateau is reached.
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#1968743 - 10/04/12 03:26 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: outo]
atinm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/31/12
Posts: 25
Loc: Cambridge, MA
Originally Posted By: outo
I don't see memorizing or looking at your hands as bad habits. After all scores are hardly ever used by pianists when they perform and they look at their hands all the time.


A lot of ensemble playing like in Chamber music is done with the score - even by professionals. E.g. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP1WFiNCCZU - Martha Argerich is sight-reading it though given who she is, I'm sure she is familiar with the work but doesn't have it memorized. I think you really need to be able to both memorize and sight-read depending on the circumstances. Personally, my "repertoire" is just the pieces I can play well - via memorization or sight-reading is immaterial - my friends and family don't complain when I play from sheet music and neither should anyone else!

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#1968746 - 10/04/12 03:45 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: atinm]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3181
Loc: Maine
Originally Posted By: atinm
E.g. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP1WFiNCCZU - Martha Argerich is sight-reading it though given who she is, I'm sure she is familiar with the work but doesn't have it memorized.

She's not sight-reading it. That's what you do the first time you read a piece. She's reading it, having practiced it a lot (either with or without the score) since she sight-read it the first time of seeing it.

It would be very unusual for someone reading from the score in performance, to actually be sight-reading: i.e. seeing the piece for the first time.
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#1968747 - 10/04/12 03:47 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: PianoStudent88]
atinm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/31/12
Posts: 25
Loc: Cambridge, MA
Agreed - but she's not got it memorized either, that's what the point I was making. Not prima vista reading but she doesn't have it memorized as part of her concert repertoire like she does say the Rach 3.

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#1968748 - 10/04/12 03:49 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: atinm]
outo Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/02/12
Posts: 696
Loc: Finland
Originally Posted By: atinm
Originally Posted By: outo
I don't see memorizing or looking at your hands as bad habits. After all scores are hardly ever used by pianists when they perform and they look at their hands all the time.


A lot of ensemble playing like in Chamber music is done with the score - even by professionals. E.g. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP1WFiNCCZU - Martha Argerich is sight-reading it though given who she is, I'm sure she is familiar with the work but doesn't have it memorized. I think you really need to be able to both memorize and sight-read depending on the circumstances. Personally, my "repertoire" is just the pieces I can play well - via memorization or sight-reading is immaterial - my friends and family don't complain when I play from sheet music and neither should anyone else!


I certainly didn't mean that there's something wrong with using sheet music! It all depends on the circumstances and what one wants to do. I have zero interest in playing with others, my teacher has tried to urge me, but I am simply not interested.

At this point it's less important for me which pieces I play actually (as long as I like them), it's all about getting the piano work for me instead of me working for the piano (that's how I feel now). So I want to have pieces that I can just play from memory concentrating on the finesse while practicing the other pieces to learn new techniques. Looking at my hands is part of controlling and analysing the movements, I simply don't have good enough kinetic sense to always know what I am doing without looking. I also feel that after so many years of neglect my brain needs all type of exercise, memorizing being one of them...

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#1968749 - 10/04/12 03:49 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: atinm]
Quarkomatic Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/16/10
Posts: 75
Loc: Toronto, ON, Canada
Originally Posted By: atinm
A lot of ensemble playing like in Chamber music is done with the score - even by professionals. E.g. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP1WFiNCCZU - Martha Argerich is sight-reading it though given who she is, I'm sure she is familiar with the work but doesn't have it memorized.


I just watched that video with the audio muted, and I must say it was hilarious!

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#1968751 - 10/04/12 03:50 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: Quarkomatic]
atinm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/31/12
Posts: 25
Loc: Cambridge, MA
Originally Posted By: Quarkomatic
Originally Posted By: atinm
A lot of ensemble playing like in Chamber music is done with the score - even by professionals. E.g. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP1WFiNCCZU - Martha Argerich is sight-reading it though given who she is, I'm sure she is familiar with the work but doesn't have it memorized.


I just watched that video with the audio muted, and I must say it was hilarious!


I looked for the most obviously non-memorized one (it seems like an impossible to memorize piece!) ;-)


Edited by atinm (10/04/12 03:52 PM)

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#1968755 - 10/04/12 03:58 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3181
Loc: Maine
Originally Posted By: atinm
Agreed - but she's not got it memorized either, that's what the point I was making. Not prima vista reading but she doesn't have it memorized as part of her concert repertoire like she does say the Rach 3.


I agree that the point is that she doesn't have it memorized, but the incorrect use of the word "sight-reading" bugs me, because it makes for unclear communication.

In a recent recital, one performer said that they were sight-reading for their performance, and was congratulated on this. I'm still not sure if the performer meant s/he hadn't practiced and could play so well at first sight of the music, or simply that s/he hadn't memorized. Nor am I sure if the complimenters were complimenting on the basis of playing so well at first sight of the music, or complimenting the ability to play while reading rather than having to memorize to compensate for poor reading skills.

If people used the word sight-read accurately, this type of confusion wouldn't occur.


Edited by PianoStudent88 (10/04/12 04:00 PM)
Edit Reason: small fixes
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Ebaug(maj7)

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#1968770 - 10/04/12 04:23 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3181
Loc: Maine
Even for those of use who mostly read music rather than memorizing, maintenance of repertoire (non-memorized) is an issue. There are many pieces where I think I've learned them, present them successfully at my lesson, and then go back a few months later to play them just for enjoyment, and discover that I hadn't really learned them as solidly as I thought.

I haven't yet figured out quite what to do about this. I suspect that the answer is "lots more slow and deliberate practice, with most time and effort spent on the difficult parts."

But just as for the memorizers, I find even for pieces (which I read) where my ability stays more constant over longer gaps of time, that they still benefit from periodic refreshing.

The pieces that I can play after a long hiatus with almost no deterioration, those are the ones that make me really happy that I can really play them.

As for what I like to keep: anything by Bach. All of the Anna Magdalena Bach Notebook that I've learned (mostly minuets). All of the Schumann Album for the Young that I've learned (right now I think this is only two pieces). All of the Khachaturian I've learned (one piece so far smile ). Satie Gymnopedie I and Gnossienne I.

I don't actually have all of these up to par right now, but they're the pieces I like to come back to again and again and play for pure enjoyment.

Fur Elise will go on this list once I fully learn it, as will Chopin's Prelude in E minor Op. 28 No. 4. Also the rest of Satie's Gymnopedies and Gnossiennes.

Pieces I'm ambivalent about: the canonical dramatic pieces for my level, like Heller's Avalanche and Burgmuller's Ballade. The two Beethoven Sonatinas I've learned. I sort of feel like I ought to be able to play these at the drop of a hat, and they've deteriorated. But I don't actually turn to them when I'm wondering "what shall I play for pleasure."

I also enjoy reading through the Clementi Sonatinas, but I don't feel any burning desire to get them actually up to performance standard.

I don't know if this says something more about my musical taste, or about my pianistic abilities (or lack of same).
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Ebaug(maj7)

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#1968775 - 10/04/12 04:29 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: PianoStudent88]
atinm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/31/12
Posts: 25
Loc: Cambridge, MA
Originally Posted By: PianoStudent88

She's not sight-reading it. That's what you do the first time you read a piece. She's reading it, having practiced it a lot (either with or without the score) since she sight-read it the first time of seeing it.


Also, sight-reading could mean either sight-playing, or sight-singing and doesn't have to imply "prima vista", at least that's what I understood it to mean. My teacher says "prima vista" when he specifically means that and he says that he almost never has to do that as even when he is brought in to accompany a vocalist, he is given a few minutes to study the piece, try out fingerings etc before he starts playing the piece. I was mostly complaining about the whole memorization+repertoire requirement implied by "maintaining repertoire". My teacher is very happy that I am working on my sight-reading such that I am always reading the piece and not looking at my fingers while playing (but then, I'm not doing octave jumps yet...). Keeping a piece "familiar" so one can play it while reading the score (sight-reading in my parlance ;-)) is "repertoire maintenance" for me!


Edited by atinm (10/04/12 04:37 PM)

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#1968779 - 10/04/12 04:31 PM Re: Repertoire - to maintain or not?? [Re: CebuKid]
PaperClip Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/21/09
Posts: 522
Loc: Amsterdam, Holland
No, I don't keep repertoire. As a beginner, my pieces are rather simple. And when I practise them until it sounds good, I hear them already too much and I get bored by the tune.

Also it is for me difficult to maintain, as pieces tend to sound worse gradually over time once learned until I relearn the piece for a bit again. Then I rather choose to learn something new then relearning.

However, some pieces are worth exploring a longer period, because they are complex and every time I play them I hear something new or I could express something different in the music.

The dark side is that I don't have repertoire to play, maybe one or two pieces, until I am good enough to play pieces that are worth exploring a lifetime.

My teacher says I'm different at this point than most other people. Most people just want to play piano, heh. And therefore they want to have a bigger repertoire.
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Chris

Playing since May 02 2009

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