Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Topic Options
#1981236 - 11/01/12 07:07 AM How to practice/play arpeggios
jaredm2012 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/01/12
Posts: 31
Loc: Alabama
So far, I've learned 5 scales pretty well, working on a 6th and 7th. I can play them in 16ths at about 70 BPM, four octaves hands together in parallel motion, and on most of them I can do contrary motion as well.

As exciting as that is (I feel incredible each time I "get" a new scale, especially if it is a different fingering), I just cannot seem to get the arpeggios down. Now, my teacher hasn't assigned this, rather it is just something I had fiddled around a bit with since I've learned the scales.

Let's take G major for instance. In the right hand, the fingering given in my scale book is 123 123 5 321 321

So when you play that, how should you approach the transition from 3-1 (from D to the next octave G)? Should the thumb immediately cross under the middle finger to set up for the next G? Or should you lift the hand after the middle finger note and move it to the next GBD position?

When I play it at very very slow tempos, I can make it sound fairly smooth. However, at moderate to quick tempos, it sounds very choppy (long-long-short long-long-short) and not very fluid at all. Also, I find the 3-1 stretch from D-G a bit tough and uncomfortable, and I don't have small hands.

Anyway I just wanted to get some feedback from y'all to see what the proper technique is for this and any suggestions you might have on how to effectively add them into my practice routine!

Top
(ads P/S)

Petrof Pianos

#1981243 - 11/01/12 07:32 AM Re: How to practice/play arpeggios [Re: jaredm2012]
jehalliday Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/12/08
Posts: 119
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Practice them very slowly. With your right hand, while your third finger is still on the D, get your thumb in position on the next G. The "bump" is caused by the thumb not being in position in time. Slow practice really helps with this and eventually you'll be able to speed it up. Also be aware of which direction your hand is slanted. For most keys, it helps to keep the left hand slanted slightly "uphill" and the opposite for the right. This makes is easier to reach under with your thumb. Let your fingers "walk" up the keyboard. (Are you old enough to remember the old commercial for Yellow Pages with "Let your fingers do the walking?)

Top
#1981247 - 11/01/12 07:43 AM Re: How to practice/play arpeggios [Re: jaredm2012]
Derulux Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/05
Posts: 5318
Loc: Philadelphia
This is not the easiest transition to describe online. Watch this video at the 0:59 mark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRzB2-V7dkk. This person (I have no idea who it is) doesn't have great technique, so don't copy them exactly, but the concept I want to pull out, which is somewhat visible here, is the idea of shaping.

When the hand is playing the arpeggio, there has to be a shape to it. What you see is that the hand/arm starts at its lowest point on the thumb, rises to the middle finger, the thumb passes under, and the arm comes back down to repeat the process. In this case, it helps to get the hand out of the way in order to pass the thumb under.

You also need to move your elbow way out in order to get your thumb under without twisting. Really exaggerate it at first.. it will feel uncomfortable. Try putting both your middle finger and the thumb on the notes they need to play--3 on D, 1 on G--and then look at your wrist. Move your elbow out until your wrist is straight and you can play the notes comfortably without forcing your hand to stay in a certain position. Now go a little farther and see if it's more comfortable. Repeat until you find the "comfortable" spot. Yep, that far out.

The last two concepts for a true legato feel, I'm hoping you can intuit. They are more difficult to describe. If the above does not help, I would wait for your teacher, or ask your teacher. It would be worse to learn it wrong and have to "unlearn" it, than to wait a few extra days and learn it the right way. Promise. Because I once had to unlearn 15 years of playing, and I still don't think I'm completely cured. wink

Anyway, hope it helps. smile


EDIT: just saw someone beat me to a reply, and want to add just one thing.
Originally Posted By: jehalliday
Practice them very slowly. With your right hand, while your third finger is still on the D, get your thumb in position on the next G. The "bump" is caused by the thumb not being in position in time. Slow practice really helps with this and eventually you'll be able to speed it up. Also be aware of which direction your hand is slanted. For most keys, it helps to keep the left hand slanted slightly "uphill" and the opposite for the right. This makes is easier to reach under with your thumb. Let your fingers "walk" up the keyboard. (Are you old enough to remember the old commercial for Yellow Pages with "Let your fingers do the walking?)

First, very nice Yellow Pages reference! laugh

What I want to add is this: the lack of legato is caused by two things. The first, you mention expertly. The second would be an early release of the third finger before the thumb has a chance to play. It sounds like semantics, but technique-wise, it's not. Either could be the culprit, so check both.

Some signs of a thumb problem: thumb is out of position, hearing separation between 3-1; thumb enters late on the beat

Some signs of a 3rd finger problem: thumb is in position, still hearing separation between 3-1; thumb enters on-time without rushing to play the note

I don't think your thumb needs to play any "earlier", but that could technically be the case. What I think you really need here is to hold your 3rd finger until the thumb plays. Some of the technique I described above will help you do this. But, like I said, if you're still having trouble, you should ask your teacher. They can sit at the piano with you and go through the motions, where we can only type. smile


Edited by Derulux (11/01/12 07:49 AM)
_________________________
Every day we are afforded a new chance. The problem with life is not that you run out of chances. In the end, what you run out of are days.

Top
#1981613 - 11/02/12 04:38 AM Re: How to practice/play arpeggios [Re: jaredm2012]
Bobpickle Offline

Gold Supporter until July 10  2014


Registered: 05/24/12
Posts: 1383
Loc: Cameron Park, California
I once watched Lypur's video posted above and it kind of helped introduce the topic to me in the past, but this video I saw recently seemed quite a bit better (with quite a bit less silly beginning teacher ramblings), as well as the second (all of Josh Wright's videos are pretty great)




Top

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Help buying digital piano for my son
by roomservicetaco
09/18/14 11:54 PM
Headphone impedance for DP90se
by lunobili
09/18/14 10:29 PM
A Simulation Investigating the Source of Inharmonicity
by PaintedPostDave
09/18/14 10:18 PM
Chrono Trigger piano medley
by Stefo
09/18/14 04:44 PM
need help with deciding between digital and acoustic
by luvboise713
09/18/14 04:16 PM
Who's Online
127 registered (7notemode, andriy555, A Guy, accordeur, 3times2, 39 invisible), 1097 Guests and 19 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76250 Members
42 Forums
157616 Topics
2315136 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission