Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#1988287 - 11/18/12 08:22 PM Quietening a piano
Markjitsu Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/17/12
Posts: 4
Hi, anyone tried this using foam/insulation?
Any success?
Thanks in advance!
(it's an upright overstrung btw)

Top
(ads 568) Hailun Pianos

piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#1988308 - 11/18/12 09:30 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
scepticalforumguy Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/18/08
Posts: 1475
Loc: Lower Mainland, BC
Do you mean spray foam?!?

I've used pillows tucked between the beams both on uprights and grands, and it reduces the sound substantially. You may not like the tone though as much, but it's a cheap trade off.
_________________________
Recordings of my recent solo piano and piano/keyboard trio jazz standards.



Top
#1988454 - 11/19/12 09:37 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: scepticalforumguy]
Steve Cohen Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 10341
Loc: Maryland/DC/No. VA
Go to www.edwardsstringcovers.com

They have a great foam insulating product that works quite well.
_________________________
Piano Industry Consultant- http://www.linkedin.com/pub/steve-cohen/6/b92/b80

Consultant & Contributing Editor - Acoustic & Digital Piano Buyer

Jasons Music
Maryland/DC/No. VA
Since 1937.

www.jasonsmusic.com
My postings, unless stated otherwise, are my personal opinions, not those of my clients.

Top
#1988466 - 11/19/12 09:59 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
Markjitsu Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/17/12
Posts: 4
Thanks guys!
Any chance you could post a photo of the positioning of pillows etc?
Thanks again!

Top
#1988482 - 11/19/12 10:26 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
turandot Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/07
Posts: 7089
Loc: torrance, CA
Pillows are pretty drastic in muffling the tone. The positioning would depend on how many backposts you have and how far apart they are.

It might be good to start with something more moderate. If you have an area rug (synethtic, not wool) that you can spare, hang it on the wall behind your piano. If it's long enough to go down the wall and under the piano as well, that's even better. If that doesn't quiet enough, you can attach the rug directly to the back of the piano using velcro.

Acoostic foam is available pretty cheaply at places like eBay in precut sheets and by roll. You could get a roll and cut panels to fill the spaces between the posts, but it's a lot of effort and some expense if it turns out that you don't get the result you want.

Before you do anything though, you should assess the surfaces of the room to see if they can absorb enough sound to serve a piano. Hardwood floors don't help. Smooth ston and ceramic flooring is worse. Big expanses of bare glass are awful.
_________________________
Will Johnny Come Marching Home?
The fate of the modern wartime soldier

Top
#1988507 - 11/19/12 11:36 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
Steve Cohen Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 10341
Loc: Maryland/DC/No. VA
Quilts or comforters are worth a try.
_________________________
Piano Industry Consultant- http://www.linkedin.com/pub/steve-cohen/6/b92/b80

Consultant & Contributing Editor - Acoustic & Digital Piano Buyer

Jasons Music
Maryland/DC/No. VA
Since 1937.

www.jasonsmusic.com
My postings, unless stated otherwise, are my personal opinions, not those of my clients.

Top
#1988688 - 11/19/12 08:25 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
Dave B Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 1730
Loc: Philadelphia area
Cheaper yet, get ear plugs for everyone in the house.

Or +1 to Steve. I've heard the custom fit product from Edwards String Covers works.

Top
#1988873 - 11/20/12 09:13 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Dave B]
turandot Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/07
Posts: 7089
Loc: torrance, CA
Originally Posted By: Dave B
Cheaper yet, get ear plugs for everyone in the house.

Or +1 to Steve. I've heard the custom fit product from Edwards String Covers works.


You've heard the products working or you've heard from others in your trade that they work?

All that Edwards offers for a vertical piano are thick baffles of acoustic foam that have an egg crate pattern to the inside and a smooth surface to the outside, in other words standard acoustic foam. They cut the baffles to order. It's custom work so not cheap. If the OP wants to hold down the cost, he can buy 3" egg crate acoustic foam from any number of sources and cut panels himself to fit the back of his piano.

The thing is though that most people like the sound of a piano when they acquire it. It's their space and the piano's placement in that space that's the culprit in most cases. Muffling the natural sound of a piano is not attacking the problem at its source. It stifles the piano's sound at its source and compresses its entire dynamic range.

Treating the room surfaces will allow the piano to perform as it was intended to perform (assuming that the piano is in good working condition).
_________________________
Will Johnny Come Marching Home?
The fate of the modern wartime soldier

Top
#1989030 - 11/20/12 05:24 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
KurtZ Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/13/10
Posts: 774
Loc: The Heart of Screenland
turandot's 100 percent correct.

Why is the full symphony not too loud at 103 db but your upright is at 90db? Why can I sit 10 feet away from a full concert grand in a recital and not have my ears bothered? Why is the distortion from a solid state circuit considered noise and distortion from a tube amp considered musical? I know at least a few here know the answer. The ratio of even and odd order harmonics is the answer. Could you enjoy a full tablespoon of chile powder right out of the spoon? No, sir. Not I either. But spread it out over a pot of beans, onion, tomatoes and ground beef? Yeah Howdy! Pass me a beer! Your rooms are doing the same thing. They're throwing the ratio of good sounds to bad sounds out of whack. The rooms is adding that second tablespoon of chile powder that makes you go, "yuck! I hate chile! The predominance of harsh tones caused by nearby, flat surfaces bothers your ear causing a reaction that feels like too loud. So you come here and say, "My piano's too loud" what do I do?

On the other Hand:

My wife can't hear her show. My kids can't sleep. My neighbor can't enjoy her canasta game. These are volume problems and will not be cured or helped by putting lids down, taping eggcrate to the wall, or stacking all the rugs in Turkey under the piano. Just because you made a noticeable change to the sonic signature of the room doesn't mean you did one ding-dong thing to keep the sound out of other spaces.

Real Problem number one: My piano sounds like caca.
Real Problem number two: My piano intrudes on others.

Until you know the which is the real problem at hand, all advice proffered here is specious and near useless.

Don't wreck a good piano trying to fix a crappy room. It'll still be a crappy room and you'll be trading one flavor of crappy for another. On the other hand, real soundproofing is really expensive. I added about $10,000 to the cost of a re-model making a room in which I could play the piano while my kids sleep 20 feet away. Most of the other solutions for the piano itself, practice rails, string covers and foam against the soundboard are all more than a little detrimental to the sound of the piano. The latest, greatest, newest generation of the more than sufficient Privia is about $600. If I didn't have my double walled, double doored, double windowed, testosterone-sanctuary, I'd probably take the Privia before I played a piano through a felt curtain or one that had no sustain and no tone.

Kurt
_________________________
I just wanted to be just "a" guy. That's enough of a life.

Top
#1989046 - 11/20/12 06:20 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
Markjitsu Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/17/12
Posts: 4
Thankyou all for your input!
I'll make a few things clearer:
I'm well aware that foam etc all over the piano will ruin the sound - it's not a long term solution - I intend to build a sound booth in the near future - this is just a temporary measure, so I can play a bit more without worrying about the neighbours!
Thanks again smile

Top
#1989070 - 11/20/12 07:40 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
gnuboi Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/26/10
Posts: 2349
Loc: USA
Turandot and Kurt make excellent points... the ideal solution is to put the right piano in the right room.

If you don't have a recital hall, you can add rugs, curtains, panels, etc. etc., and turn your living room into something that looks like a recording studio.

You could change your piano. Most of the time that's even less practical than treating the room.

Or you could just spend under $100 on some eBay acoustic foam like Turandot suggested and put them behind the upright. Your living room wouldn't look any different. You wouldn't have to vacuum that rug or dust those curtains. You would get a tonal change, but I believe the trade off is more than fair. Use just the right amount of foam; by the time you kill the sustain it's already too quiet. If it sounds fine to you but a visitor complains that it's too quiet, well, maybe their hearing is gone.

Top
#1989075 - 11/20/12 08:01 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: gnuboi]
pianoloverus Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19097
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: gnuboi
Turandot and Kurt make excellent points... the ideal solution is to put the right piano in the right room.
But it's not correct to think that adjusting the room's acoutics or piano's placement will always work.

Top
#1989108 - 11/20/12 09:16 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: pianoloverus]
turandot Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/07
Posts: 7089
Loc: torrance, CA
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: gnuboi
Turandot and Kurt make excellent points... the ideal solution is to put the right piano in the right room.
But it's not correct to think that adjusting the room's acoutics or piano's placement will always work.



Look, no one has intimated that any one thing will be a satisfactory solution to the OP's ears, but you have to start somewhere. Assessing the properties of the room's surfaces is where I'd start. I don't like stuffing things into piano cavities. That's my taste based on experience.

If you have other sugesstions than the ones given, make them. If you're just here to be argumentative, go play solitaire.
_________________________
Will Johnny Come Marching Home?
The fate of the modern wartime soldier

Top
#1989191 - 11/21/12 12:55 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: pianoloverus]
KurtZ Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/13/10
Posts: 774
Loc: The Heart of Screenland
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: gnuboi
Turandot and Kurt make excellent points... the ideal solution is to put the right piano in the right room.
But it's not correct to think that adjusting the room's acoutics or piano's placement will always work.


Will always work to do what? Bake cookies? Speaking in unreferenced gibberish does nothing to help to OP. When did I ever claim that something always works for anything?

Kurt
_________________________
I just wanted to be just "a" guy. That's enough of a life.

Top
#1989199 - 11/21/12 01:44 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: gnuboi]
KurtZ Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/13/10
Posts: 774
Loc: The Heart of Screenland
Originally Posted By: gnuboi
Turandot and Kurt make excellent points... the ideal solution is to put the right piano in the right room.

If you don't have a recital hall, you can add rugs, curtains, panels, etc. etc., and turn your living room into something that looks like a recording studio.

You could change your piano. Most of the time that's even less practical than treating the room.

Or you could just spend under $100 on some eBay acoustic foam like Turandot suggested and put them behind the upright. Your living room wouldn't look any different. You wouldn't have to vacuum that rug or dust those curtains. You would get a tonal change, but I believe the trade off is more than fair. Use just the right amount of foam; by the time you kill the sustain it's already too quiet. If it sounds fine to you but a visitor complains that it's too quiet, well, maybe their hearing is gone.



You're repeating the nonsense that I'm trying to fight. But by all means encourage the OP to waste "under a hundred" on useless measures for his actual problem. If the foam is just resting back there and not wrecking the decor or the sound then it's also not doing any good. If a piece of foam is actually going to reduce the db spl sufficiently to keep the neighbors off his back, it's going to have to be in there between the posts enough to actually impede the soundboard. If it isn't touching the soundboard, foam by itself isn't dense enough to attenuate any but the highest frequencies which are not what's causing the OP his problems with the neighbors.

I didn't recommend the OP live in a recording studio nor a recital hall. I made the point that what MANY people call too loud is actually rotten acoustics; that people routinely listen to pianos louder than uprights without feeling that they were too loud. I'll be clear. I didn't recommend ANYTHING to anyone EXCEPT that they understand their problem before spending money on any product whatsoever. I tried to add enough background and detail to support my position. A detail you've omitted. If you can't explain the how and why, you're just another repeater of conventional wisdom offering the OP a band-aid when his problem is a bacterial infection.

Have a good thanksgiving

Kurt
_________________________
I just wanted to be just "a" guy. That's enough of a life.

Top
#1989228 - 11/21/12 04:49 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
Dave Horne Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5260
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
I remember not all that long ago having a pissing contest with someone here who stated that loud pianos are not an issue. I rarely see posts where the issue is a too quiet piano. Why is that?

When I owned my Yamaha C3 I crawled under the piano and stuffed\wedged many towels in the soundboard. I also placed strips of felt between the lid and the body (thus outlining the shape of the piano). I placed the music rack on top of a closed lid to further quiet down the piano.

Fortunately at that time we lived in a free standing house.

Decades ago when I owned a Yamaha U1D upright I tacked carpet tiles on the soundboard (on the outer backside) and tacked carpet tiles and empty eggshell containers on the inside lid ... everywhere.

I also made my own felt drop down mute which was positioned between the hammers and the strings.

Pianos are loud, I have tinnitus, and my solution is listed in my signature. I now practice with headphones at a very quite level. When I play jobs on an acoustic piano, I wear earplugs.

One more thing, a friend of mine who is a piano technician used a solution of fabric softener and isopropyl alcohol which he applied to the hammers of my C3 (probably after needling them). That quieted down the piano but the effect only lasted for about six months.

Pianos are loud.
_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

Top
#1989247 - 11/21/12 07:09 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Dave Horne]
Dara Online   blank
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/18/09
Posts: 985
Loc: west coast island, canada
Originally Posted By: Dave Horne

Pianos are loud.


Pianos are silent...

and until someone,
plays upon them,
from soft touch to loud thundering
they remain silent.

.... people tend to be loud


Top
#1989254 - 11/21/12 07:26 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Dara]
Dave Horne Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5260
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
... people tend to be loud

and yet some profiles are silent. smile
_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

Top
#1989258 - 11/21/12 07:43 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
acortot Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/28/07
Posts: 423
Loc: Italy
yet another thread which begs for an older-style lower tension piano for the home..

Chopin Played on a grand piano which even though 2.05-2.10 m in length had a moderate volume, good for the home.

Most modern grands are built with the purpose of filling concert halls!
_________________________
rhythm must be inborn

An Article on the unusual makeup of original Pleyel hammers, during Chopin's lifetime:

http://acortot.blogspot.it/2012/07/pleyel-hammers-in-chopin-era-i-martelli.html

Top
#1989323 - 11/21/12 10:17 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Dave Horne]
turandot Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/07
Posts: 7089
Loc: torrance, CA
Originally Posted By: Dave Horne


Decades ago when I owned a Yamaha U1D upright I tacked carpet tiles on the soundboard (on the outer backside) and tacked carpet tiles and empty eggshell containers on the inside lid ... everywhere.

One more thing, a friend of mine who is a piano technician used a solution of fabric softener and isopropyl alcohol which he applied to the hammers of my C3 (probably after needling them).


These would seem to be measures taken out of frustration.


Even though the OP has not mentioned what piano he is working with, I think it's safe to assume that he is not frustrated with his piano and likes its tone. One does not build a sound booth to enshrine a piano one really doesn't like (at least I hope not).

Since he only wants a temporary solution, I hope that the OP would not resort to damaging the profile of his hammers with fabric softener and alcohol or compromising his soundboard by putting tacks in it.

Edwards claims that by sandwiching a grand piano with their 3" foam -- top cover over the strings and bottom panels to cover the soundboard cavities -- you can achieve a 50% reduction in sound. They make no specific claims for treating vertical pianos with foam panels between the backposts.

What Edwards does not mention is that 50% success in suppressing the loud end of the dynamic range will be matched by playing difficulties at the soft end, where a player's normal pianissimo touch will be unlikely to produce a sufficiently audible sound with any consistency.

Grands and verticals are different in the dispersal of their sound and in the player's perception of how loud that sound is. A player who finds loud playing satisfying (and somehow emotionally fulfilling) can be fooled on a long grand piano. His seat at the piano will not give him a true perception of just how loud the thing sounds to other people sharing a tight space. A player seated at a typical tall vertical has a better sense of his loudness But despite that difference, players who like to play loud seldom realize how overbearing the volume of their playing is on those who are forced to hear it. What they will notice is the unpleasantness of piano sound careening around the room boucing off hard surfaces. Changing that pattern by giving the room more sound absorbing properties will help both the loud player and those who are forced to endure his playing on a regular basis.

Recently I watched an interview with Julius-Jeongwon Kim made while he was in London recording Warrenberg's piano concerto transcription of Rachmaninoff's 2nd Symphony with the LSO. Kim commented on how wonderful the acoustics were at the Abbey Road studio where the production was made. That studio is in no way designed to simulate a concert hall. It's just a box. Yet a full orchestra and a concert grand can exist harmoniously in that space without the musicians' hearing of others interfering with their ability to execute their own part in some really loud and powerful material. It can be done, but not by suppressing musical instruments at the source of their sound or building a box within a box.
_________________________
Will Johnny Come Marching Home?
The fate of the modern wartime soldier

Top
#1989344 - 11/21/12 11:13 AM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: turandot]
Dave Horne Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5260
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
These would seem to be measures taken out of frustration.

No, those measures were taken because the pianos were too loud.

If anyone is interested, the Yamaha U1D was first in a second floor apartment and then in a row home ... neighbors were an issue though the piano in and of itself was loud.

The C3 was a great piano but it also was too loud. My wife couldn't watch TV or talk on the phone if I were practicing the C3. The piano was in our living room, not everyone has a room dedicated for the purpose of making music. There are many reasons why individuals want their instruments a little quieter.

Believe me, if acoustic pianos came with a $50 option and you could dial down the acoustic output to the level of a whisper, everyone would spend a little extra for that add on.

As I've stated many times, the action of a piano comes first for me with the sound a very close second. Some guys like loud pianos ... and some of us have tinnitus (as was already mentioned).

_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

Top
#1989372 - 11/21/12 12:01 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Dave Horne]
turandot Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/07
Posts: 7089
Loc: torrance, CA
Originally Posted By: Dave Horne
These would seem to be measures taken out of frustration.

No, those measures were taken because the pianos were too loud.

If anyone is interested.......


Dave,

Your personal history with acoustic pianos has been documented before here. I'm sympathetic to your tinnitus and don't want to seem cold, but IMO tinnitus isn't a good reason to punish a piano for being what it is by tacking carpet squares to its soundboard. OTOH, your Avant solution seems to make a lot of sense.

Maybe I should have written 'desperation' instead of "frustration", as in a desperate last resort measure.

Anyway, it seems unlikely that the OP has tinnitus, so hopefully measures needed don't become that drastic for him.
_________________________
Will Johnny Come Marching Home?
The fate of the modern wartime soldier

Top
#1989396 - 11/21/12 12:57 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
Dave Horne Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5260
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
I carpeted down the U1D before I had the tinnitus. I was 20 or 21 when I bought a brand new full sized Yamaha upright ... over 40 years ago. The tinnitus has only been an issue for the last 20 years.
_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

Top
#1989400 - 11/21/12 01:07 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 20752
Loc: Oakland
Why did you buy a piano that you thought was too loud?
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1989411 - 11/21/12 01:39 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: BDB]
ando Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/10
Posts: 3336
Loc: Melbourne, Australia
Originally Posted By: BDB
Why did you buy a piano that you thought was too loud?


They're all too loud!

Top
#1989413 - 11/21/12 01:40 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 20752
Loc: Oakland
If you think that, why buy a piano at all?
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1989416 - 11/21/12 01:45 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: BDB]
Dave Horne Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5260
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
Originally Posted By: BDB
Why did you buy a piano that you thought was too loud?


After you live with a piano for years the hammers get harder, the piano gets brighter and louder ... and it doesn't start out real quiet to begin with.

Acoustic pianos are loud. I know there are differences between pianos ... and even within the same model series but there's a lot of acoustic energy being created.

With an upright piano, you are right on top of the sound. The soundboard is vertical and the entire wall (within arm's reach) radiates the sound back to you.

A grand piano has a nice and big soundboard ... and it's loud.

As I wrote earlier in this thread, if there were a $50 option that would dial down the acoustic output of a piano to a whisper, I'd bet that there would be a lot of takers. I certainly would have bought it.

The original poster wants to quiet down his upright for his neighbor's benefit. That was my initial reasoning as well. It's difficult, especially in the US, to practice in an apartment or a row home with an acoustic instrument. I am also sensitive to loud noise ... and this was before the tinnitus.

For some folks, bigger is always better ... and louder is always better. I'd love to practice on a piano with the action of a none footer but I don't have the room ... and it would be even louder than my previous work horse, the C3.

What I have now is a good compromise ... though I'd still like to have the action of a nine footer.
_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

Top
#1989418 - 11/21/12 01:49 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: Markjitsu]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 20752
Loc: Oakland
In other words, you bought a piano, you did not take care of it, and now you have decided all pianos are like the piano that you did not take care of.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1989422 - 11/21/12 01:56 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: BDB]
Dave Horne Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5260
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
Originally Posted By: BDB
In other words, you bought a piano, you did not take care of it, and now you have decided all pianos are like the piano that you did not take care of.


Yes, that's exactly what I did. crazy

I'll leave this thread after this message. I spent a small fortune having my pianos tuned, regulated, and voiced. I spent a lot of time and energy making the pianos quiet initially for my neighbors and then for me.

I swear, it's always the silent profiles that make the most noise. wink
_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

Top
#1989427 - 11/21/12 01:59 PM Re: Quietening a piano [Re: BDB]
ando Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/10
Posts: 3336
Loc: Melbourne, Australia
Originally Posted By: BDB
In other words, you bought a piano, you did not take care of it, and now you have decided all pianos are like the piano that you did not take care of.


Why don't you take your ignorant anger somewhere else?

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  Ken Knapp, Piano World, Rickster 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
144 registered (accordeur, 36251, Akshay, 49 invisible), 1449 Guests and 27 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74232 Members
42 Forums
153556 Topics
2250500 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
The Search
by mlpiano88
04/18/14 07:25 PM
Polyphony with Polyphonist - Installment 1
by Polyphonist
04/18/14 06:51 PM
Help dating old Mcphail Upright Piano
by joe513
04/18/14 06:39 PM
OT: John Passion
by wimpiano
04/18/14 04:33 PM
3/4 time for 6/8 time comping patterns?
by Ben Ther
04/18/14 04:33 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission