Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) End Stage Fright
End Stage Fright
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#1993959 - 12/03/12 02:11 AM weak popular works and their link to the audience?
Nikolas Online   content
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/26/07
Posts: 4982
Loc: Europe
In a thread by Debrucey there's mentioning that the Rach Prelude in C#m is weak and definitely not his strongest work (rather far from that. I happen to agree.

Other extremely popular works are the fur Elise, Clair de Lune, and whatever else...

None of the above show the particular strengths of the composer (in a very personal opinion) and they are more catchy and beautiful than masterful. This doesn't take away from their value, but it does appear that more knowledgeable listeners, or performers, or musicians appreciate other works and are turned off by such popular works.

If we take the above (personal, I repeat) premise as a fact, what does this mean for the general audience then? Why isn't the hammerklavier as popular as fur Elise? Why isn't L'apremidi d'un Faune (spelling... YIKES) more popular than Clair De Lune (I know this one. Because Clair De Lune was used in 'Twilight'...).

Are we 'doomed' to have less masterful works as the most popular works? IS a performer 'doomed' to have to perform such works? Is a composer 'doomed' to have to compose in such ways?
_________________________
http://www.musica-ferrum.com

Top
(ad) Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#1993968 - 12/03/12 03:18 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19285
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: Nikolas
...If we take the above (personal, I repeat) premise as a fact, what does this mean for the general audience then?....

I wouldn't take it as a fact. IMO absolutely every classical work I can think of that has "caught on" tremendously with the general public, deserves it in some way. I think the reason some or many of those works may seem less-than-great to us is that they're so familiar that they've lost their impact for us, and/or that they're less complex and "deep" than some other works. But they make up for the latter with other qualities.

OK....I guess I've just answered what I think is a thing that it means for the general audience: Complexity and depth don't matter that much, and might even be negatives. But you need great beauty, or great striking drama, or something else very direct and powerful.

Quote:
Why isn't the hammerklavier as popular as fur Elise?

Complexity and depth. grin

Quote:
Why isn't L'apremidi d'un Faune (spelling... YIKES) more popular than Clair De Lune....

Too hard to spell. ha

Quote:
Are we 'doomed' to have less masterful works as the most popular works? IS a performer 'doomed' to have to perform such works? Is a composer 'doomed' to have to compose in such ways?

If you want something to catch on with "the general public," make it pretty simple, and make it something that they can go out humming. smile

Top
#1993982 - 12/03/12 05:04 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: Nikolas


Are we 'doomed' to have less masterful works as the most popular works?


Yes.

Quote:


IS a performer 'doomed' to have to perform such works?



Ask Pollini.

Quote:


Is a composer 'doomed' to have to compose in such ways?


Ask Kurtag.


It's always been the case - the more refined and sophisticated the art, the less popular it is (there are exceptions, but I think that general rule is still true). The reason why this is true should be fairly obvious - learning how to perceive and appreciate subtlety, nuance, complexity, cultural references, creative adventure, etc., requires a kind of interest and devotion that many people just don't want to invest, for whatever reasons.

Maybe, for them, the payoff isn't great enough to get them to become connoisseurs of the art. Because, basically, that's what it takes to move beyond the "easy-listening" and "highly accessible" stage of appreciation. You don't jump directly from de Falla's "Ritual Fire Dance" to his Harpsichord Concerto, without first experiencing a good deal of growth as a music connoisseur, IMO.

I also think there are cultural feed-back loops that tend to wildly emphasize popular "classical hits" in a weird way. For example, the use of Barber's Adagio for Strings to signify "sad". Or how the Funeral March from Chopin's 2nd sonata became the go-to funeral march. Or even how a piano playing an Alberti bass has become a kind of short-hand for classical music (usually of the prissy and stuffy sort, I think, and probably derived from the opening of "that" Mozart sonata in C major).

Top
#1994083 - 12/03/12 11:15 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19094
Loc: New York City
Many of the pieces named in the OP are relatively easy or at least offer a big payoff in terms of their difficulty. Thus they are popular with intermediate pianos students and become popular in general.

Fur Elise, on its first(and many students seem not to get much beyond there), page offers relatively little technical challenge because except for a few cross overs the hands stay in one position. It also offers a very Romantic sounding Beethoven which may appeal to younger students. If Fur Elise was missing its first page I don't think it would have any popularity and might be virtually unknown as I think it's weaker than most of the other Bagatelles.

Rachmaminov's C# minor Prelude offers an appealing and soaring melody but mostly the opportunity to play those gigantic chordal and octave passages that will again have great appeal for a young piano student. I bet many PW members can recall their thrill at first playing those passages. It offers a chance to impress a listener with a piece that probably sounds more difficult than it is. I think the C# minor Prelude is like the Brahms G minor Rhapsody. I do not think the Brahms is one of his better works but it is extremely popular as a teaching piece because it offers a big payoff for relatively modest technical demands. The opening octave passages will be highly appealing to young students and also offers a piece where their octave technique can be worked on.

Clair de Lune is among Debussy's easier works and at least on the first two pages offers the chance to play those appealing jazz like chords and relatively small technical demands. CDL offers a souped up Romantic introduction to Impressionist music. Later works by Debussy are more sophisticated harmonically and probably wouldn't have as much appeal to a young student.

Top
#1994087 - 12/03/12 11:20 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
bennevis Online   content
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 4362
Tune, tune, tune.

I still remember what drew me originally to Beethoven as a child (and no, it wasn't the Hammerklavier). And what drew me to Rachmaninoff. And Mozart, and so on.

It was the catchy tunes.

Not the complexity, nor the harmonic invention, nor the brilliance of the writing.

Top
#1994098 - 12/03/12 11:45 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Derulux Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/05
Posts: 5059
Loc: Philadelphia
I think, in order to seek the answer to your question, the first question to ponder is this: who defines what "masterful" means? I'm sure if you ask someone who believes the opposite to find that these works, which have stood the test of time and remain extremely popular, are in fact the greatest works of a genius composer, and are thus representative of their most masterful effort.

The problem is, art is 100% subjective on a long enough timeline.
_________________________
Every day we are afforded a new chance. The problem with life is not that you run out of chances. In the end, what you run out of are days.

Top
#1994156 - 12/03/12 01:47 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Orange Soda King Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/25/09
Posts: 6035
Loc: Louisville, Kentucky, United S...
I feel these pieces are musically accessible to the common ear, and I agree with some of the points made by lots of the posters in this thread.

Top
#1994201 - 12/03/12 03:41 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: bennevis]
didyougethathing Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/08/11
Posts: 534
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Tune, tune, tune.

I still remember what drew me originally to Beethoven as a child (and no, it wasn't the Hammerklavier). And what drew me to Rachmaninoff. And Mozart, and so on.

It was the catchy tunes.

Not the complexity, nor the harmonic invention, nor the brilliance of the writing.


I happen to agree with this. There's something to be said about a great tune. What makes a memorable tune? No one knows. It's just one of those mysterious things about humans.

I also think many of the more famous pieces are the shorter ones and have to do with many beginning pianists learning them. We are more likely to hear a million amateurs playing Fur Elise than a million amateurs playing the Hammerklavier.

A side note on Clair De Lune: This is one of those "overplayed" pieces that everyone knows. However, to me it represents a sort of perfection in structure and execution. It is just the right length, it is structured beautifully, and just seems like one of those pieces that the composer wrote in one sitting, where every note fell into place easily. This is all my opinion of course, but it really does have that perfect storm of inspiration going for it. It's sublimely beautiful no matter how many times I hear it.

Top
#1994299 - 12/03/12 07:20 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: bennevis]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Tune, tune, tune.

I still remember what drew me originally to Beethoven as a child (and no, it wasn't the Hammerklavier). And what drew me to Rachmaninoff. And Mozart, and so on.

It was the catchy tunes.

Not the complexity, nor the harmonic invention, nor the brilliance of the writing.


I don't think "the" Rachmaninoff prelude has much of a tune. The whole piece is more like effective dramatic gesturing.

Top
#1994319 - 12/03/12 07:46 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: didyougethathing]
carey Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 6031
Loc: Phoenix, Arizona
Originally Posted By: didyougethathing
A side note on Clair De Lune: This is one of those "overplayed" pieces that everyone knows. However, to me it represents a sort of perfection in structure and execution. It is just the right length, it is structured beautifully, and just seems like one of those pieces that the composer wrote in one sitting, where every note fell into place easily. This is all my opinion of course, but it really does have that perfect storm of inspiration going for it. It's sublimely beautiful no matter how many times I hear it.


Glad you said this.

I always thought Clair de Lune was an early work - BUT (from Wiki): "Although Debussy wrote the piece in 1890 at the age of 25, it was not published until 1905. By that time it had been partially re-written as well as re-titled. The original name of this piece was “Promenade Sentimentale.” The new title for the movement comes from a poem by the same name written by Paul Verlaine.....”

Learn something new every day. grin






Edited by carey (12/03/12 07:46 PM)
_________________________
YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/pianophilo

Top
#1994327 - 12/03/12 08:04 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: carey]
didyougethathing Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/08/11
Posts: 534
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: carey

Glad you said this.

I always thought Clair de Lune was an early work - BUT (from Wiki): "Although Debussy wrote the piece in 1890 at the age of 25, it was not published until 1905. By that time it had been partially re-written as well as re-titled. The original name of this piece was “Promenade Sentimentale.” The new title for the movement comes from a poem by the same name written by Paul Verlaine.....”

Learn something new every day. grin


Indeed! I knew of the poem, but not of the background of the piece.

Top
#1994329 - 12/03/12 08:14 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: carey]
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19094
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: carey
I always thought Clair de Lune was an early work - BUT (from Wiki): "Although Debussy wrote the piece in 1890 at the age of 25, it was not published until 1905. By that time it had been partially re-written as well as re-titled. The original name of this piece was “Promenade Sentimentale.”
Unless there was major rewriting I would say that it remains an early work. It certainly is, even its revised form, in the style of what is considered his earlier period.


Edited by pianoloverus (12/03/12 08:15 PM)

Top
#1994347 - 12/03/12 09:02 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Forstergirl Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/02/09
Posts: 55
Loc: Ontario

Yay, Diduougetthathing!


(In reference to Clair de Lune) "has that perfect storm of inspiration going for it. It's sublimely beautiful no matter how many times I hear it."

Same reason why we've been loving certain paintings forever

Top
#1994358 - 12/03/12 09:56 PM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: wr]
Arghhh Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/31/08
Posts: 1025
Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Tune, tune, tune.

I still remember what drew me originally to Beethoven as a child (and no, it wasn't the Hammerklavier). And what drew me to Rachmaninoff. And Mozart, and so on.

It was the catchy tunes.

Not the complexity, nor the harmonic invention, nor the brilliance of the writing.


I don't think "the" Rachmaninoff prelude has much of a tune. The whole piece is more like effective dramatic gesturing.



Another piece that I think fits this criteria for popularity instead of having a great tune is the Precipitato movement from Prokofiev's 7th piano sonata. A student at my school played this for a concert with a variety of groups and soloists, and deliberately played it faster and louder than usual for this particular audience. They loved it. I suppose there is a somewhat catchy tune, or motive in the bass, but more catching IMO is the rhythmic drive.

Top
#1994426 - 12/04/12 02:00 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Arghhh]
Mark_C Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 19285
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: Arghhh
Originally Posted By: wr
I don't think "the" Rachmaninoff prelude has much of a tune. The whole piece is more like effective dramatic gesturing.
Another piece that I think fits this criteria for popularity instead of having a great tune is the Precipitato movement from Prokofiev's 7th piano sonata....more catching IMO is the rhythmic drive.

We had mentioned other things besides catchy melody that can make something a huge hit and which cover pieces like the Rachmaninoff and the Prokofiev. Like:

Originally Posted By: Mark_C
....you need great beauty, or great striking drama, or something else very direct and powerful.

Top
#1994431 - 12/04/12 02:05 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: pianoloverus]
carey Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 6031
Loc: Phoenix, Arizona
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: carey
I always thought Clair de Lune was an early work - BUT (from Wiki): "Although Debussy wrote the piece in 1890 at the age of 25, it was not published until 1905. By that time it had been partially re-written as well as re-titled. The original name of this piece was “Promenade Sentimentale.”
Unless there was major rewriting I would say that it remains an early work. It certainly is, even its revised form, in the style of what is considered his earlier period.


It's definitely an early work - even with the later modifications. But now I seriously doubt that Debussy had "moonlight" in mind when he composed it. Fortunately Debussy was able to rename the piece himself in 1905.
_________________________
YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/pianophilo

Top
#1994442 - 12/04/12 02:50 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Verbum mirabilis Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 06/15/11
Posts: 185
It's very easy to impress people. I heard someone say "how can someone play so fast?" when I played one of those runs in the Mozart d minor fantasy.

A few weeks ago there was a video of some chinese 6-year-old on the webpage of a popular yellow media newspaper. The title was something like "how can someone this young play this well?" The boy played pretty well for someone of his age, but in the end it was just an arpeggiated I chord, then the same chord being banged in forte. Then IV, I, V, I. After listening to the video I went to the piano and played the same by ear.
_________________________
Working on
Sibelius: Sonatina in E major
Liszt: Consolation no. 3
Chopin: op. 25 no. 2
Haydn: Sonata in e minor, hob XVI no. 34
Bach: P&F in D major, book 1

Top
#1994462 - 12/04/12 04:42 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: carey]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: carey
Originally Posted By: didyougethathing
A side note on Clair De Lune: This is one of those "overplayed" pieces that everyone knows. However, to me it represents a sort of perfection in structure and execution. It is just the right length, it is structured beautifully, and just seems like one of those pieces that the composer wrote in one sitting, where every note fell into place easily. This is all my opinion of course, but it really does have that perfect storm of inspiration going for it. It's sublimely beautiful no matter how many times I hear it.


Glad you said this.

I always thought Clair de Lune was an early work - BUT (from Wiki): "Although Debussy wrote the piece in 1890 at the age of 25, it was not published until 1905. By that time it had been partially re-written as well as re-titled. The original name of this piece was “Promenade Sentimentale.” The new title for the movement comes from a poem by the same name written by Paul Verlaine.....”

Learn something new every day. grin



Yes, that's interesting info. And it was interesting to read that the Passepied was originally called Pavane, which kind of sort of maybe supports my hunch that everybody plays it much, much too fast.

Top
#1994463 - 12/04/12 04:57 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Derulux]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: Derulux
I think, in order to seek the answer to your question, the first question to ponder is this: who defines what "masterful" means? I'm sure if you ask someone who believes the opposite to find that these works, which have stood the test of time and remain extremely popular, are in fact the greatest works of a genius composer, and are thus representative of their most masterful effort.

The problem is, art is 100% subjective on a long enough timeline.


Who defines "masterful" is described in the OP.

And he's right - mastery isn't about popularity, it's about what those who are knowledgeable and experienced in the art think. Which, by the way, is not 100% subjective.

Otherwise, we're just talking pop music, and not fine art.

Top
#1994465 - 12/04/12 04:58 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: wr]
drumour Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/08/05
Posts: 829
Loc: Scotland
[/quote]

Yes, that's interesting info. And it was interesting to read that the Passepied was originally called Pavane, which kind of sort of maybe supports my hunch that everybody plays it much, much too fast.

[/quote]

That is interesting - makes a lot of sense too. It does seem to be very Pavane-like.
_________________________
Vasa inania multum strepunt.

Top
#1994472 - 12/04/12 05:13 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: Nikolas

Other extremely popular works are the fur Elise, Clair de Lune, and whatever else...

None of the above show the particular strengths of the composer (in a very personal opinion) and they are more catchy and beautiful than masterful. This doesn't take away from their value, but it does appear that more knowledgeable listeners, or performers, or musicians appreciate other works and are turned off by such popular works.



I'd put the issue a little differently, because I don't think the more knowledgeable folks are necessarily turned off by the early popular works, so much as feeling that it is unfortunate that the general audience doesn't have a similar enthusiasm for the "grown-up" music of those same composers.

Or, said differently, it is too bad some listeners (and pianists) stay stuck in the "ear candy" stage, because there is so much more wonderfulness to be had in classical music if they can just get past wallowing in the low-hanging fruit (to mix a few metaphors).

Top
#1994474 - 12/04/12 05:18 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: wr]
Nikolas Online   content
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/26/07
Posts: 4982
Loc: Europe
Originally Posted By: wr
I'd put the issue a little differently, because I don't think the more knowledgeable folks are necessarily turned off by the early popular works, so much as feeling that it is unfortunate that the general audience doesn't have a similar enthusiasm for the "grown-up" music of those same composers.

Or, said differently, it is too bad some listeners (and pianists) stay stuck in the "ear candy" stage, because there is so much more wonderfulness to be had in classical music if they can just get past wallowing in the low-hanging fruit (to mix a few metaphors).
I think that you've hit the nail on the head with the 'ear candy' comment!

I think I wasn't too clear or specific with my OP (and further I was too busy to take part), but this includes most of my thoughts really...
_________________________
http://www.musica-ferrum.com

Top
#1994478 - 12/04/12 05:39 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Marco M Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/28/12
Posts: 444
Loc: Europe
Originally Posted By: Nikolas
...it does appear that more knowledgeable listeners, or performers, or musicians appreciate other works and are turned off by such popular works.

... what does this mean for the general audience then?


Well, being one out of the general audience and not from the knowledgeables, I can underline what others answered already: The impressive emotional effects (may it just be loudness or speed, or a maestoso or sad tone) attract a lot, and if they are even coming in an easy to remember tune, then the word will be spread on it.

Music is first of all emotion and not a contest, and thus not well received by the 'general' listener if for listening having to work on it. If I feel like entertaining myself by concentrating, searching and analysing, then I can also open my physics books. Actually, if I read in a physics book, then I can stay relaxed by listening at the same time to some popular piano music, but I couldn´t split my concentration on physics and on a masterfully enriched piano act at the same time.
So - 'generally' spoken -, keep things simple but beautiful.

Top
#1994487 - 12/04/12 06:13 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Marco M]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: Marco M

So - 'generally' spoken -, keep things simple but beautiful.


Why?

Most great musical art doesn't strike me as being very simple, and it often isn't "beautiful", either. There is little "beauty" in the first movement of Beethoven's 5th Sym., but it is generally recognized as a great artistic achievement.

Top
#1994489 - 12/04/12 06:14 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Marco M]
debrucey Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/18/06
Posts: 2587
Loc: Manchester, UK
Originally Posted By: Marco M
If I feel like entertaining myself by concentrating, searching and analysing, then I can also open my physics books.


1. Music is not necessarily entertainment.

2. Your analogy to a physics book is incorrect. When I listen to complex music, I am not concentrating, searching and analysing any more than when I listen to simple music. This is because I have been listening to lots of different kinds of music for a long time to the point where any 'understanding' that needs to happen has become innate, just like the 'understanding' that happens when most people listen to Fur Elise.

3. It's rather patronising to suggest that anyone who listens to music that doesn't resonate with you is only doing so as an intellectual pursuit rather than because they receive genuine musical enjoyment from it.
_________________________
Kapustin - Preludes Op. 53, Nos. 8, 11, 12, 9 and 10
Poulenc - Nocturnes and Novellettes
Barber - Souvenirs
Esa-Pekka Salonen - Dichotomie
Kevin Oldham - Ballade, Op. 17

Top
#1994495 - 12/04/12 06:49 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
Praeludium Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/19/11
Posts: 90
Loc: Besançon, France
Nobody mentionned Dvorak's Symphony 9 "The new world" ? It seems to be both a super complex and super popular work to me.

Top
#1994550 - 12/04/12 09:38 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: wr]
Derulux Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/05
Posts: 5059
Loc: Philadelphia
Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: Derulux
I think, in order to seek the answer to your question, the first question to ponder is this: who defines what "masterful" means? I'm sure if you ask someone who believes the opposite to find that these works, which have stood the test of time and remain extremely popular, are in fact the greatest works of a genius composer, and are thus representative of their most masterful effort.

The problem is, art is 100% subjective on a long enough timeline.


Who defines "masterful" is described in the OP.

And he's right - mastery isn't about popularity, it's about what those who are knowledgeable and experienced in the art think. Which, by the way, is not 100% subjective.

Otherwise, we're just talking pop music, and not fine art.











Herein lies my exact point, and I'll use your definition to prove it: what happens when someone who is knowledgeable disagrees with someone else who is also knowledgeable? wink
_________________________
Every day we are afforded a new chance. The problem with life is not that you run out of chances. In the end, what you run out of are days.

Top
#1994552 - 12/04/12 09:44 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Nikolas]
debrucey Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/18/06
Posts: 2587
Loc: Manchester, UK
I disagree that art is 100% subjective.
_________________________
Kapustin - Preludes Op. 53, Nos. 8, 11, 12, 9 and 10
Poulenc - Nocturnes and Novellettes
Barber - Souvenirs
Esa-Pekka Salonen - Dichotomie
Kevin Oldham - Ballade, Op. 17

Top
#1994559 - 12/04/12 09:57 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Derulux]
wr Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 7422
Originally Posted By: Derulux
Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: Derulux
I think, in order to seek the answer to your question, the first question to ponder is this: who defines what "masterful" means? I'm sure if you ask someone who believes the opposite to find that these works, which have stood the test of time and remain extremely popular, are in fact the greatest works of a genius composer, and are thus representative of their most masterful effort.

The problem is, art is 100% subjective on a long enough timeline.


Who defines "masterful" is described in the OP.

And he's right - mastery isn't about popularity, it's about what those who are knowledgeable and experienced in the art think. Which, by the way, is not 100% subjective.

Otherwise, we're just talking pop music, and not fine art.


Herein lies my exact point, and I'll use your definition to prove it: what happens when someone who is knowledgeable disagrees with someone else who is also knowledgeable? wink


Then you have a disagreement. So what? It's not algebra.

Top
#1994563 - 12/04/12 10:09 AM Re: weak popular works and their link to the audience? [Re: Derulux]
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19094
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Derulux
Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: Derulux
I think, in order to seek the answer to your question, the first question to ponder is this: who defines what "masterful" means? I'm sure if you ask someone who believes the opposite to find that these works, which have stood the test of time and remain extremely popular, are in fact the greatest works of a genius composer, and are thus representative of their most masterful effort.

The problem is, art is 100% subjective on a long enough timeline.


Who defines "masterful" is described in the OP.

And he's right - mastery isn't about popularity, it's about what those who are knowledgeable and experienced in the art think. Which, by the way, is not 100% subjective.

Otherwise, we're just talking pop music, and not fine art.

Herein lies my exact point, and I'll use your definition to prove it: what happens when someone who is knowledgeable disagrees with someone else who is also knowledgeable? wink
Not really. It's a consensus of knowledgable opinions, not one knowledgable person's opinion.

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  Brendan, Kreisler 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
77 registered (beeboss, Beemer, 36251, Al LaPorte, Atrys, Asmodeus, 19 invisible), 1201 Guests and 51 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74198 Members
42 Forums
153494 Topics
2249228 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Tips for playing a piece through
by Hemmingway
18 minutes 0 seconds ago
Temperature and tuning
by Beemer
Today at 04:46 AM
Tired Fingers
by adanepst
Today at 01:45 AM
Bechstein 7
by PhilipInChina
Today at 01:07 AM
Premier Piano of New York
by FenderJazzMan
Yesterday at 11:58 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission