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#2002910 - 12/22/12 12:34 AM Keeping new pianos like new
daniokeeper Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/01/09
Posts: 1142
Loc: PA
I'm curious as to what techniques other tuners/techs use one the initial service calls to try to keep brand new instruments they service like new. So, this thread on the topic. It should be interesting to see where it goes.

For instance, when I would get called to do the initial tuning/service call on a piano, I would leave the knuckles or hammer butt leathers alone if there was no excessive friction or squeaking. My thinking was to leave it "like factory."

But later, I decided to begin using either talcum powder or Teflon powder on the initial service call in order to try to fight friction and wear right from the beginning. Also, on the key bushings and other potential friction points.

I've also started using just a tiny dab of ProTek MPL-1 on threaded section of vertical action bolts in case the action needs to be removed later after being left undisturbed for a long time.

I've been debating whether or not it might be a good idea to use just a little ProTek MPL-1 on the pedal prop bushings in order to lubricate them and protect them from oxidation over the years.
_________________________
Joe Gumbosky
Piano Tuning & Repair
www.tinyurl.com/tunerjoe
(semi-retired)

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#2003259 - 12/22/12 10:09 PM Re: Keeping new pianos like new [Re: daniokeeper]
Dave B Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 2154
Loc: Philadelphia area
Joe, I view it more as a process of helping the piano break in.

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#2003395 - 12/23/12 07:51 AM Re: Keeping new pianos like new [Re: daniokeeper]
Olek Online   content
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 8257
Loc: France
There is no "secret" you just do things without compromising and settle your regulation, hammer mating and voicing, tuning, the best you can and taking the necessary time (coming twice at a few wekks intervals is a good starting point for regulation/voicing

Tuning until the tuning can stand a seaosonal change without moving much is the ideal other point, some very well scaled pianos will need not much (also if the factory have a good procedure for strings settling)

Then onceall that is done all depends of the place hygrometry, the use of the instrument, and its design.

I have seen instruments that stayed amazing well during years, and others that needed tweaks at every seasonal change.

Even under moderate use, a well designed piano will wear in 10 years (key mortises, hammers)

Can stay in a"playeable" condition, but with wear.

Tuners know how to keep playeable hammers that need to be changed, but nobody knows how to avoid mortise rebushing (some lube slow the cloth wear)with today cloth which wear faster than the one availeable before WWII (for instance)
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Professional of the profession.

I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!

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#2003396 - 12/23/12 07:53 AM Re: Keeping new pianos like new [Re: daniokeeper]
Olek Online   content
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 8257
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: daniokeeper


But later, I decided to begin using either talcum powder or Teflon powder on the initial service call in order to try to fight friction and wear right from the beginning. Also, on the key bushings and other potential friction points.



One of the "official" reasons to use Powder on knuckles is to avoid the leather contamination with the graphite coating on the jack and lever, as a knuckle with a nap have a better tactile feedback.

products based on Teflon include an agent that tend to get non lubrication with time, then they need to be cleaned and coated again. greases also act like that, some more than others.
o
I have some Protek lube bottles, they evaporate, leaving a sticky residue. I stopped using them when I had some squeaks , or messed with gummy keyboard pins. Renner also have used some spray that tend to add wear on the cloths (used on vertical spoons, a greyish coating)
their DAG and spring graphite are excellent, need to be burnished but the coating hold well.


Edited by Kamin (12/23/12 08:00 AM)
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Professional of the profession.

I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!

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