Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 47 1 2 3 ... 46 47 >
Topic Options
#1955027 - 09/06/12 07:28 PM Classical Sonata Analysis
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
We are starting afresh with our efforts in analysis by digging into pieces that less experienced pianists are more likely to be able to play and which provide ample opportunities to develop analytical skills.

We will start with Clementi's Sonatina Op. 36 No. 1 in C major, first movement.
It should be known to many pianists.

Here is a collection containing all six sonatinas 6 Sonatinas

And here is one performance Sonatina No. 1

I won't advise you where to start at this stage beyond listening, playing and seeing what you can make of the score.

ETA: There's a link a few posts down to a version of this sonatina with bar numbers marked, courtesy of Greener.


Edited by zrtf90 (09/07/12 10:18 AM)
_________________________
Richard

Top
(ads P/S)
Petrof Pianos

piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#1955165 - 09/07/12 01:18 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Derulux Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/05
Posts: 5067
Loc: Philadelphia
Interesting, I first played this 22 years ago.. my introduction to Clementi and really among the first classical music pieces I ever played. I can't hear the audio on the computer I'm on right now (on the road), but I'll check it out when I get back next week. I may follow along on this one. Good choice. smile
_________________________
Every day we are afforded a new chance. The problem with life is not that you run out of chances. In the end, what you run out of are days.

Top
#1955292 - 09/07/12 08:45 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
Great to hear Derulux. Please do join us. We need more students. Carol, Jim and I could use more company ... and help.

I see we do not have measure #'s written in. I will work on writing these in (at least for No. 1) with new download available
shortly.
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955308 - 09/07/12 09:10 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11190
Loc: Canada
The sonatina is like a simple version of the sonata. Both have three movements, usually with the middle movement slow and the others fast such as allegro.

In sonata-allegro form (I've seen it written as "sonata form"), the piece has three sections:
1. Exposition: Two or more themes or subjects are set out, one after the other, with the second one in a new key. Sometimes there will be a passage bridging the subjects, and the section can be prolonged at the end.
2. Development: This is where the composer gets creative. He may take part of the original subject and play with it, going to different keys.
3. Recapitulation: The composer goes back to the subjects we saw in the Exposition. This time the second subject will stay in the original key.

A sonatina is much simpler version of a sonata. In the first Allegro movement, the music up to the repeat sets up the subjects in the two keys. In the second half, there is a short development. Then we see the same subjects that we had before in the Exposition. The first is an octave below the original, and Clementi does a mirror image of some of the notes. The second movement stays in the tonic key.

Top
#1955312 - 09/07/12 09:18 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: keystring]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
In light of this Keystring, I may have got carried away with my numbering. Perhaps should have started over, for each section? At any rate, if we are all working from same song sheet, may be OK.

If not though, let me know if renumber is preferred.

Sonatine OP 36 NO1 - Section measures starting at 1



Edited by Greener (09/07/12 10:21 AM)
Edit Reason: Section numbers reset to start at 1
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955316 - 09/07/12 09:22 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Let's run through some of the things we can do at the start of our analysis.

Look at:
1. The composer. This will give a very rough guide to date and style. The more you know about the principal composers of the period the more information you can glean just from the name.

Clementi is considered the father of modern piano playing. He was the first composer to make use of the dynamic properties of the new instrument and the new action. He competed with Mozart for piano-playing honours (and gained far more from it than Mozart ever did). His compositions evoked the admiration of Beethoven (for whom he became the English publisher) and Brahms. He is famed for his ability to play thirds, and you'll come across some in this sonatina.

He is probably most famous for his Gradus ad Parnassum (Steps to Parnassus), a collection of 100 exercises to develop pianoforte technique. Though they are less favoured now than they have been they are, like Chopin's etudes, full of musical value as well as pedagogical value. They are not, though, for beginners.

His six progressive sonatinas, of which we are studying the first, are still standard fare in piano pedagogy. They have much musical interest and provide would-be pianists with first class opportunities for a fine, well-rounded technique.

2. The title. This may give an initial indication to the form or genre and (coupled with the composer) an indication of what to expect. A sonatina in Clementi's hand is a sonata on a small scale.

As has been mentioned in our travels, the architectural forms developed before 1600 were musically satisfying. They are the backbone of contemporary songs today. But with the development of equal temperament and tonality there emerged out of the otherwise simple binary form a more versatile method of providing structure, namely key.

After the height of the baroque period (around 1720) and the deaths of Bach, Handel and Scarlatti there was a lull in musical creativity (in terms of great composers). Most of the new music was provided by the sons of Bach, predominantly CPE and JC Bach and revolved around the Galant style, the storm and stress movement building up in literature and the sentimental Empfindsamer style. These styles merged towards the end of the century (around 1770) and two huge figures rose to lead the way in the development of the classical sonata and symphony, Haydn and Mozart.

3. The music. Key, tempo, metre, texture, colour (amount of accidentals), dynamics, rhythmic diversity, scale and complexity can all be had from a fairly quick perusal of the score.

Repeat bars are an easy to spot indicator of sections though not always exactly at the section end. Rests in both hands can sometimes indicate the same thing. Plain double bar lines usually indicate a division between sections.

4. After reading or playing through and listening, hearing or imagining (or audiating as Edwin Gordon describes it) the music we should have a better idea of what's going on and we can begin to define sections, pick out principal cadences and thematic material and gradually allow the form and structure to emerge.

5. After a good overview we could begin a key scheme diagram and/or harmonic analysis.
_________________________
Richard

Top
#1955317 - 09/07/12 09:23 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11190
Loc: Canada
Your numbering efforts are greatly appreciated, Greener. I think (?) usually every movement starts with a number 1 since they can also be played as separate pieces. For me personally a number is a number but the group may feel different, and maybe we should be correct about it.

Top
#1955330 - 09/07/12 09:55 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: keystring]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: keystring
I think (?) usually every movement starts with a number 1 since they can also be played as separate pieces.


Section measures starting at m1 - Download
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955336 - 09/07/12 10:08 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11190
Loc: Canada
Some terminology / concept questions
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

3. Key, tempo, metre, texture, colour (amount of accidentals), dynamics, rhythmic diversity, scale and complexity can all be had from a fairly quick perusal of the score.

key, tempo, and meter are clear

What is texture?

What is colour? Going by the clue "amount of accidentals" I imagine it might mean how often it changes keys by modulation? In which case accidentals used for things like neighbour tones would not count.

Top
#1955337 - 09/07/12 10:09 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: keystring]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: keystring
Your numbering efforts are greatly appreciated, Greener. I think (?) usually every movement starts with a number 1 since they can also be played as separate pieces. For me personally a number is a number but the group may feel different, and maybe we should be correct about it.


I have numbered my score like Jeff has done. How should it be numbered?

Richard. Thanks for the history (I love history).
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955339 - 09/07/12 10:12 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

4. After reading or playing through and listening, hearing or imagining (or audiating as Edwin Gordon describes it) the music we should have a better idea of what's going on and we can begin to define sections, pick out principal cadences and thematic material and gradually allow the form and structure to emerge.


Just listening for now to 1st movement:

2 Major key cadences in first A. Not sure yet, what they are, but sounds like 2. And, it sounds all major.

Section B, starts out what sounds like minor. Again, have not identified for sure with score and key, but sounds minor to me with shift to major at m24.

I shall go back and verify now.
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955342 - 09/07/12 10:16 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Great job, Jeff. You might disable the earlier link or point it to the new version.
_________________________
Richard

Top
#1955349 - 09/07/12 10:22 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: HeirborneGroupie]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: HeirborneGroupie
Originally Posted By: keystring
Your numbering efforts are greatly appreciated, Greener. I think (?) usually every movement starts with a number 1 since they can also be played as separate pieces. For me personally a number is a number but the group may feel different, and maybe we should be correct about it.


I have numbered my score like Jeff has done. How should it be numbered?

Richard. Thanks for the history (I love history).


OK. I've got it. I missed Jeff's second link.
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955353 - 09/07/12 10:34 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
You might disable the earlier link or point it to the new version.


Good point. Previous link has been edited and points now to new download.
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955356 - 09/07/12 10:40 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

Great job, Jeff.


With what ... my numbering or my analysis to date.

I'm pretty confident with counting, but not so confident with Sonatine analysis, so hoping it is the latter smile

You're Welcome


Edited by Greener (09/07/12 11:01 AM)
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955357 - 09/07/12 10:43 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: keystring]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: keystring
Some terminology / concept questions
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

3. Key, tempo, metre, texture, colour (amount of accidentals), dynamics, rhythmic diversity, scale and complexity can all be had from a fairly quick perusal of the score.

key, tempo, and meter are clear

What is texture?

What is colour? Going by the clue "amount of accidentals" I imagine it might mean how often it changes keys by modulation? In which case accidentals used for things like neighbour tones would not count.

Colour (color): Yes, it may indicate either a change of key or just, er, colour!

In this piece the accidentals are most likely to indicate key change. In Liszt's Grand Galop Chromatique it may just be because he used the wrong key signature smile

Texture: Music may be categorised as monophonic (one voice like a solo flute piece), polyphonic (many voices like a fugue), homophonic (melody and accompaniment like a Chopin Nocturne or the E minor prelude) etc.

It may also be considered from the view point of lush or sparse, i.e. the number of notes in chords. Compare this sonatina, for example, with Mozart's Sonata in A minor, K310.

Dynamics: In this work there are no extremes. From Piano to Forte is as far as we need to go.

Rhythmic diversity: the rhythm here is more diverse than the reams of quavers or semiquavers typical of the non-sustaining baroque instruments but there are mostly only crotchets and quavers (quarter and eighth notes).

Scale is small as you'd expect of a sonatina and complexity is, er, rather limited. Mostly only rhythmically simple right hand over mostly single bass notes.
_________________________
Richard

Top
#1955367 - 09/07/12 11:06 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: Greener]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: Greener

Just listening for now to 1st movement:

2 Major key cadences in first A. Not sure yet, what they are, but sounds like 2. And, it sounds all major.

Section B, starts out what sounds like minor. Again, have not identified for sure with score and key, but sounds minor to me with shift to major at m24.

I shall go back and verify now.

Oh, my goodness, my gracious! We're at it again with the cross-postings!

Good job with the renumbering, Jeff.

As to the analysis, section A is up to the first repeat bar and B is from it.

In a sonata/sonatina we refer to the first "half" (up to the repeat bar) as the 'exposition' where the composer lays out his principal ideas, one idea or set of ideas in the tonic key and another typically contrasting set in the dominant key. It is not so much the contrast in themes (Mozart used greater contrasts than did Haydn) but there IS contrast between the keys. This provides drama which was newly emerging in music after the Baroque period.

The second half begins with the 'development' where he takes those ideas and weaves his magic with them exploring different keys, variations, juxtapositions etc, and finally, the 'recapitulation' where the composer reminds us of the initial material first heard in tonic and dominant by repeating it but this time it may be slightly altered with regard to what happened in the development, perhaps, and it will all be in the tonic key.

So basically it's the presentation, development and resolution of conflict. The story is told not by the architectural means of verses and choruses or section A's and section B's but by the interplay of themes and ideas in different keys.

Yes, stick with the first movement for now.

Yes, the development begins in minor and the recapitulation begins at M24 in major.
_________________________
Richard

Top
#1955377 - 09/07/12 11:25 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Question. I thought the whole first page up until measure 38 was the Exposition. It contains two ideas, each repeated and the second in a different key. Am I incorrect?
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955385 - 09/07/12 11:41 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: HeirborneGroupie]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: HeirborneGroupie
Question. I thought the whole first page up until measure 38 was the Exposition. It contains two ideas, each repeated and the second in a different key. Am I incorrect?

Up to the repeat bar is the exposition.

There are two 'ideas' in the first 15 measures. The trick is to find them - that's what analysis is! smile

Hint: Look for accidentals starting to appear.
_________________________
Richard

Top
#1955388 - 09/07/12 11:48 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

There are two 'ideas' in the first 15 measures. The trick is to find them - that's what analysis is! smile


Idea #1 - m1-m8 in key of C major
Idea #2 - m9-m15 in key of G major

this is what I think
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955389 - 09/07/12 11:49 AM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
OK, so each movement has an exposition, development and recapitulation?
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955398 - 09/07/12 12:08 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: HeirborneGroupie]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: HeirborneGroupie
OK, so each movement has an exposition, development and recapitulation?

Any of (or only) the movements in sonata form will have an exposition (up to the repeat bars), a development (from the repeat bars) and a recapitulation where at least the material you first heard in the dominant will be played again in the tonic. Usually both ideas are repeated in the recapitulation.

The other movements in this sonatina are not themselves in sonata form, just in a sonata.

I didn't realise, Carol, how complicated it all is but you'll get it. smile
_________________________
Richard

Top
#1955401 - 09/07/12 12:18 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

There are two 'ideas' in the first 15 measures. The trick is to find them - that's what analysis is! smile

Hint: Look for accidentals starting to appear.



OK. I'm seeing measures 1-5 C major (1st idea). Measures 6-15 G major (2nd idea).
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955405 - 09/07/12 12:22 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: zrtf90

The other movements in this sonatina are not themselves in sonata form, just in a sonata.



OK. This explains a lot. Thanks Richard.
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955406 - 09/07/12 12:25 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
This is getting exciting now, Carol.

I see the change with incidentals starting at 6. But, when listening, it sounds to me like the new idea doesn't really happen until m9, and already in new key.

dunno, but that was my reasoning
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955408 - 09/07/12 12:30 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: Greener]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: Greener


I see the change with incidentals starting at 6. But, when listening, it sounds to me like the new idea doesn't really happen until m9, and already in new key.

dunno, but that was my reasoning


Wow. I can hear that now. You're probably right Jeff smile .
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955410 - 09/07/12 12:36 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1073
Loc: Toronto
We're a team then. Richard, please refer to our combined analysis and conclusion above for first A of 1st movement.
_________________________
“Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.”
--Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

            

Top
#1955416 - 09/07/12 12:44 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: zrtf90]
PianoStudent88 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 2978
Loc: Maine
I would call mm.1-4 the first theme, in C major. Mm.5-8 are a transition, starting in C major and ending in G major. The transition is to the second theme in mm.9-15, which is in G major.

Part of my choice to identify mm.5-8 as a transition is based on looking at how this material reappears at the end of the movement.
_________________________
Ebaug(maj7)

Top
#1955418 - 09/07/12 12:48 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: PianoStudent88]
HeirborneGroupie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/09
Posts: 223
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: PianoStudent88
I would call mm.1-4 the first theme, in C major. Mm.5-8 are a transition, starting in C major and ending in G major. The transition is to the second theme in mm.9-15, which is in G major.

Part of my choice to identify mm.5-8 as a transition is based on looking at how this material reappears at the end of the movement.


I'm looking for where measures 5-8 reappear at the end but I'm not seeing it. Could you point out where exactly this happens?
_________________________
Carol
Kawai RX 2


Top
#1955420 - 09/07/12 12:50 PM Re: Classical Sonata Analysis [Re: Greener]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2230
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: Greener
This is getting exciting now, Carol.

I see the change with incidentals starting at 6. But, when listening, it sounds to me like the new idea doesn't really happen until m9, and already in new key.

dunno, but that was my reasoning

That's excellent, Jeff.

The figure in M1, I will call the bugle call. It recurs in M2. In M3 we have a new figure, a four-note descending sequence. Where else do you see the bugle call and where else a four-note descending sequence?

In M8 there's a new figure, a rising sequence of 8 notes followed by a fourth figure, an octave leap to three crotchets/quarter notes.

If you take those figures out of the score what are left with? Are there any more patterns up to the repeat bars?
_________________________
Richard

Top
Page 1 of 47 1 2 3 ... 46 47 >

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
105 registered (3rd Ear, AZ_Astro, accordeur, Atrys, angga888, 36 invisible), 1190 Guests and 35 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74264 Members
42 Forums
153619 Topics
2251520 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Noodling board
by Maarkr
04/20/14 10:20 PM
New Movement Composed "To Rule" 4/20/2014
by hsheck
04/20/14 10:17 PM
Understanding Sharps
by imustlearn
04/20/14 08:18 PM
When a beginner is not a beginner anymore?
by Eight Octaves
04/20/14 08:09 PM
DEBUSSY-"Serenade for the Doll" from 'Children's Corner'
by Hal Freedman
04/20/14 07:14 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission