Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 33 of 53 < 1 2 ... 31 32 33 34 35 ... 52 53 >
Topic Options
#1678659 - 05/16/11 10:14 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
And "Today in Underage Wedding History:"

1770 – 14-year old Marie Antoinette marries 15-year-old Louis-Auguste who later becomes king of France.
1836 – Edgar Allan Poe marries his 13-year-old cousin Virginia.

It is also the birthday of Studs Terkel in 1912, and Liberace in 1919. Two names I never thought to see linked.

I gave Waltz of the Asparagus People to Darlene to read; she is such a big fan. She especially admired Rhythm, which will show you what a finely-honed taste she has for a great story well-told. It is also a fact that she faithfully returns borrowed books. But she seemed greatly surprised when I told her that you knew who she is.

"Oh yes," I replied, knowingly. "Robin knows all kinds of things." Not wishing to overplay my hand, I added, "She knows Dave, too."

Of course you know who your fans are. I'm only surprised that President Clinton hasn't written a personal note to tell you how much he enjoyed Piano Girl. Maybe Hillary got it away from him, or one of the aides kept it for himself. Maybe Bill just scanned it in the limo, on the way to the next interview, looking in vain for the story about the Three Wise Men. It's still in print these several years later--- well-outdistancing the industry average. That will tell you that someone liked it, and I'm sure you know who better than I.


Edited by Jeff Clef (05/16/11 05:00 PM)
_________________________
Clef


Top
Piano & Music Accessories
#1679189 - 05/17/11 07:34 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: gdguarino]
apple* Offline


Registered: 01/01/03
Posts: 19862
Loc: Kansas
Originally Posted By: gdguarino
[quote=Jeff Clef eek

But it's this guitarist that still stands out like a sore...toe, mostly for the sheer audacity of his playing. He wasn't about to hide his glaring, blinding, searing light under a bushel.



couldn't you just send him home?

(you really are quite clever)

_________________________
accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)

Top
#1679197 - 05/17/11 08:02 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Piano Girl RMG Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 702
Loc: Germany
Please give my best to Darlene. Tell her I have fan radar and I hope she enjoys the book.

Great story, Greg!

Here it is, my report from the lower circles of heck—

The Toe:
I broke it going up the steps in the lobby of IKEA. It was Day One of my fitness program, and there I was, determined as *heck* to take the steps instead of the elevator or escalator whenever possible. Good plan, right? I had developed a bad case of writer’s butt (as opposed to writer’s block) and decided to get out there and go go go.

Well, those darn Swedes. I swear the steps at IKEA are uneven or irregular or some odd shape that can only be navigated by Allan wrench-toting residents of Stockholm. There I was, bypassing all of the lazy Germans on the escalator—and feeling mighty superior— when I tripped the first time. I recovered, but tripped a second, and then a third time. I don’t know which one of the three blows did the damage. I do know that I had to go to the IKEA grocery store and buy a bag of frozen köttbulle to put on my foot. Still, it felt okay, at least for the next few hours.

But by evening I couldn’t walk. Had to go up the steps on my behind. At one point—as I dragged myself into the bathroom by slithering on the floor—my husband said I looked like that Andrew Wyeth painting, “Christina’s World.”

Toes are such important things. But injuring one of them is embarrassing somehow. It’s not like having a sprained ankle or a wrenched knee, or one of those manly injuries. It seems wimpy to have a broken toe. But let me tell you, it does not feel wimpy. It was my right foot. My pedal foot.

There would be no Day Two in my fitness program.

The good news: I recovered in a week. The first joint was cracked, but the pain went away quickly. Now it is kind of numb, which is due to nerve damage. But I’ll take numb over pain, thank you.

I took off a weekend of work, but once I went back my pedal foot was pain free. I’m ashamed to say I broke this same toe once a few years ago, and pedaled left-footed, which had the unintended result of throwing my back out (now there’s a manly injury).

So that’s the toe.

The Book Launch Concert:
It went so well! How I wish some of you (Darlene!) could have been there. I read Waltz of the AP, Naked, The Girl Who Got Away. Then there was a break and all the nice audience people drank champagne and ate tidbits of expensive things on toast. Then I came back and read What to Wear, Mr. President, and The Accidental Ambassadors. (Note: For those of you have read the book, Volkmar Schulz himself was in the audience!)

These were abridged versions of the stories, and I read them in conjunction with a German actress (Heike Bänsch), so it was a two-language program. I played pieces I’ve written to go with the stories. My playing that night wasn’t the best—I was a little wired because we had some scary-great musicians in the audience—but I did okay and managed to have fun. Voice of Doom was NOT in the room.

So many people involved in either the book or the CD were there. I should have had them stand up and introduce themselves.

“HI. I’m Alex. I’m the German publisher”

“Hi. I’m Reinhard. I engineered the recording.”

“I’m Dagmar, I translated the book.

“I’m Sharon, the friend. I listened to Robin bitch and moan about all of you.”

“I’m Julia, the daughter. I haven’t had a decent meal in six months.”

“I’m Uli, the lawyer.”

“I’m John, the husband.”

Oh yeah, I remember him.

It’s odd. I’m a small potato compared to some authors, but still, there were so many people involved in bringing WAP to this point. And I didn’t even have the USA contingent there. I am humbled and grateful.

Anyway, when I counted, there were at least 40 people in the audience who had something to do with the project. The rest of them were strangers. I sincerely hope the strangers had a good time.

And, just so we don’t stray too far from our theme, let me tell you that one of the strangers at the concert called the next day to book me for a wedding in two weeks. I met with her on Sunday, at a country club not too far from here.

I got out of my car and she said: “I just want you to know, I read the book and I do not have tattoos, nor does my mother-in-law have a dancing dog. And no one, I promise, will throw up in the bushes.”

Pity.
_________________________
Robin Meloy Goldsby
www.goldsby.de
Author of PIANO GIRL: A Memoir
RHYTHM: A Novel
RMG is a Steinway Artist

Top
#1679666 - 05/17/11 08:57 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: gdguarino]
TimR Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3215
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: gdguarino

Not so our One-Gig-Wonder. He didn't know what he didn't know, and that was plenty. And he was loud. L-O-U-D loud. His guitar tone was like a dull chain saw tearing through corrugated tin. It was all upper-midrange annoyance frequencies of the kind that signal alarm in the human brain, like sirens, colicky babies and screech-owls.




Great story. And nicely told, as always.

I had a gig a little like that last weekend. I'll be circumspect about the details, since I'll play with most of these guys again.

It was difficult music, with a band that had not played together before, but made up of some good musicians. In fact going in I was prepared to be embarassed but it didn't turn out that way.

Ah, I guess I'll admit it was the pit for a musical. I won't say which one. Which, by the way, is at the same time the most challenging and most exhilarating thing I do. Musical related or otherwise.

In cases like this I'm careful to "do no harm." Loud mistakes are for rehearsal - not getting caught is for the performance, because always remember: every gig IS an audition for the next one.

So if I was not 100% sure of the count or the entrance, I eased in. Not so two of the band members, who played as loudly when in the wrong place or wrong key as when they were right. I was careful never to make them sound bad, but it struck me as odd. For me that kind of thing is a reflex, at least if you want to get hired again. Actually it is second only to being there on time, and way behind laughing at the leader's jokes.

Of course it wasn't as bad as your scenario, because they played well much of the time. It was just that they lacked situational awareness when wrong, and played through it.



Edited by TimR (05/17/11 08:59 PM)
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
#1679695 - 05/17/11 10:05 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
apple* Offline


Registered: 01/01/03
Posts: 19862
Loc: Kansas
i was a chef for a while.. quite a while and once dropped a frozen ham on my two outer right toes. .. broke both of them.

i'll just say ouch.

Robin.. I'm just loving this 'WAP' book... almost through.
_________________________
accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)

Top
#1680081 - 05/18/11 12:54 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Piano Girl RMG Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 702
Loc: Germany
A frozen ham? I'm sure it hurt, but what a unique way to injure yourself. Ouch is right.

Thanks for reading the book, Apple, it makes me happy to know you're enjoying it!

My husband is playing with John Scofield this week. I am preparing for my annual gig for the cookbook guys—a nice group of gentlemen in the cookbook biz who hire me once a year to play from midnight to 2 a.m. for their after dinner fete. (Apple, perhaps you would be the better choice for this event, given your culinary background!) I will stay awake, I will, I will. That's on Friday. Wedding on Saturday, but I'm only playing for the cocktail hour—a DJ got the dinner music gig.
_________________________
Robin Meloy Goldsby
www.goldsby.de
Author of PIANO GIRL: A Memoir
RHYTHM: A Novel
RMG is a Steinway Artist

Top
#1680250 - 05/18/11 05:36 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: apple*]
gdguarino Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/20/07
Posts: 317
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: apple*
Originally Posted By: gdguarino
[quote=Jeff Clef eek

But it's this guitarist that still stands out like a sore...toe, mostly for the sheer audacity of his playing. He wasn't about to hide his glaring, blinding, searing light under a bushel.

couldn't you just send him home?
(you really are quite clever)

Thanks.

For a fair number of the songs we play, even bad guitar is slightly preferable to no guitar. We're a fairly resilient bunch; even when it seems that the world might (mercifully) end due to egregious aural insult, there's always the next gig.

We've had other very long nights, including a few with the ultimate nightmare - a drummer who can't keep time. But they have been few and far-between, and in most of those cases the drummer was limited more by lack of skill than bad judgment.

There was one guy who apparently had been a good drummer back when the world was young, but he had put on a lot of rust in the intervening decades.

His sense of time seemed to vary with his confidence. He'd start off carefully, playing a simple beat; not rock-steady, perhaps, but decent. But then he'd have a momentary flashback from his youth; energized with almost-forgotten vigor, he'd let fly a more complicated fill or rhythm pattern and we'd have a measure whose time signature involved Pi. People seldom like the sort of dancing that requires Geometry.

Momentarily chastened (this guy seemed to be able to recognize his own mistakes), he'd play it cool for a while. But he'd eventually feel his oats again and it was back to rockin' with Euclid and Pythagoras.

Luckily, old age and frequent gigging has taught us that the average audience member doesn't notice even the most flagrant flaws. In fact, the way some people dance, 22/7 is probably about right.
_________________________
Greg Guarino

Top
#1680308 - 05/18/11 06:39 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
“(Marion McPartland’s) relaxed interview style is not unlike her playing... she maintains an air of English graciousness—treating each guest like a long-lost best friend, using her warm and smoky voice to invite the listener into her living room for a little music and a cocktail or two.”

““She has played with, like, everyone,” says Nina as she scoops up a handful of fake ruby hair ornaments. “Oscar Peterson, George Shearing, Bill Evans, and well, the list goes on and on. She even had Clint Eastwood on the show. You know, he plays the piano.”

“Nina has done her publicist homework.

““Oh, Nina, stop. This is making me more nervous.””

------------------------------------------------------------

At first, I thought that this Clint Eastwood business was just another Three Wise Men story; any kind of liaison between Clint Eastwood and Marian McPartland simply seemed too wide a stretch. And this, mind you, so close to a story about a frozen ham.

It turned out that there is a lot more to the backstory than I would have imagined. Not that I've paid particular attention, but certain themes do seem to recur in the story of his professional work, the sentences typically beginning, “Panned by the critics in America, but awarded the highest honors in France: the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, the Légion d'honneur, the Lumiere Award, and in Italy, the Venice Film Festival Golden Lion.” Or, “Panned by the critics, these turned out to be the highest-grossing films of his career.” Or, “Panned by the critics, this film won two Academy Awards.”

And yes, he is a jazz pianist; both performing and composing, which is “playing against type” if I ever saw it (that poisonous phrase of casting agents, who are at least as vile a pest species as wedding planners). He was bound to have a big career from the very start, weighing eleven pounds, six ounces at his birth in San Francisco. ("Lawsy, Miss Scarlett!") Growing up right here in the Bay Area, he lives to this day right down the road from me--- I admit, in a more upscale neighborhood--- right by farmers’ fields of globe artichokes and asparagus.

Eastwood had intended to attend university, majoring in music theory, but instead was drafted into the Korean War... and was posted right on the Army base where Bonanza was being filmed. He later worked on the series for some years. As for his first film role, I would never have guessed there was such a film as Revenge of the Creature, a sequel to The Creature from the Blue Lagoon. Modest. But, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clint_Eastwood says... "films featuring Eastwood have grossed an average of $37 million per film,” and that is no one's small potatoes.

His Wiki article carries 309 footnotes! It is fair to say that any short synopsis, such as the present one, is bound to produce a distorted impression of such a big life. I’ll include one last quote which offers some music-related highlights (and then shut up my yap about Three Wise Men stories and frozen hams):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_life_of_Clint_Eastwood says (in this abridged quote):

“Eastwood… has had a strong passion for music all his life, particularly jazz and country and western music…. in late 1959 he produced the album Cowboy Favorites, which… included some classics such as San Antonio Rose and Cole Porter's Don't Fence Me In.

"...during the off season of filming Rawhide, Eastwood… toured rodeos, state fairs, and festivals. In 1962, the act… earned as much as $15,000 a performance.

"Eastwood"s imprint, Malpaso Records,… has released all of the scores of Eastwood's films" (some of which he composed), "...and a 1996 jazz concert, [i]Eastwood after Hours — Live at Carnegie Hall.
"

While I'm posting, I might as well go ahead and say it: describing our work as 'small potatoes' seems not only unwise (for it is a delicious vegetable), but unseemly... and even unfair. It reminds me of a long-ago roommate's comment: "No meat," he said, "and very little potatoes." He was describing our handsome next-door neighbor. Alas, all is not as it seems, even in the vegetable world. But I've got to tell you, new potatoes and green beans, lightly sauteed with garlic, dressed with a vinaigrette, and served chilled is some mighty fine eating. Especially with summer coming on.


Edited by Jeff Clef (05/18/11 06:46 PM)
_________________________
Clef


Top
#1680983 - 05/19/11 02:55 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
gdguarino Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/20/07
Posts: 317
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Piano Girl RMG
A frozen ham? I'm sure it hurt, but what a unique way to injure yourself. Ouch is right.

I seem to remember a movie, or perhaps a tv show episode, in which a man is murdered, killed by several blows with a blunt object. The detectives are stumped; they can't find a murder weapon.

All the while they are searching the house, the victim's wife is cooking a (previously frozen) leg of lamb in the oven, wearing a slight grin.

Quote:
I am preparing for my annual gig for the cookbook guys—a nice group of gentlemen in the cookbook biz who hire me once a year...


Cookbook guys? I'm trying to think of the various types of functions I've played at over the years. The one that comes to mind right now was a testimonial Dinner/Dance for the Long Island Pest Control Association, or some similar name. Those exterminators can really party. We were tossing around the idea of playing the (already comical) Rod Stewart song "Hot Legs" as "Six Legs", but didn't get around to it. Too many "Golden Thorax" statuettes to give out, crowning the "Flit Queen" and other such honors ate up the time probably.
_________________________
Greg Guarino

Top
#1681236 - 05/19/11 10:21 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: gdguarino]
TimR Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3215
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: gdguarino

Cookbook guys? I'm trying to think of the various types of functions I've played at over the years. The one that comes to mind right now was a testimonial Dinner/Dance for the Long Island Pest Control Association, or some similar name.


Long ago - long long ago, like maybe 1971, I played a party for a CB radio club.

I almost felt guilt taking their money. These guys were talkers! They kept borrowing our PA to make announcements, and seemed in love with their own voices. I bet we played less than half the pieces we normally would have.

It was, of course, a polka band. Hey, it was 1971 in northern Wisconsin! The band leader played Cordovox, an amplified accordion that has become extinct with no known regrets. And yes, 22/7 was a not uncommon time signature.
_________________________
gotta go practice

Top
#1681489 - 05/20/11 09:31 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: TimR]
gdguarino Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/20/07
Posts: 317
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: TimR

Long ago - long long ago, like maybe 1971, I played a party for a CB radio club.

I almost felt guilt taking their money. These guys were talkers!


My first paying gig would have been circa 1971. It was at the Kings Park Mental Hospital in Long Island. The three of us, who made odd flailing motions at a Fender Jaguar guitar, a Farfisa Combo Compact organ and a set of Japanese drums (back when "Japanese" did not signify "good" in the world of drums), would have been just starting high school.

We traveled to the "gig" (a word we would not have known at the time)in the back of the guitarist's Dad's Plumbing and Heating van. We sat on the floor in between our gear and the various pipes, toolboxes and cubbyholes of Elbows and Tees.

We of course sang through our instrument amps; what else was the second channel supposed to be for? Whoever had the loudest amp was the lead singer. I don't remember much of the repertoire, except for a couple of Creedence songs. I played left-hand bass on the reverse-colored octave of keys at end of the organ keyboard.

In retrospect, this may well have been a pretty depressing place. To us it presented a strange combination of feelings. We were playing on a real stage in a real auditorium, rather than in one of our basements. And we were actually being paid; $10, a princely sum for a 13 or 14 year-old in 1971. It was the big time, for sure.

But the audience was pretty unsettling, especially at our age. As best I remember it, the problems these patients had were not minor, and not difficult to spot. I'm afraid that there may have been more warehousing than care going on, but I don't really know. On that day they seemed to enjoy the entertainment, even given our limited skills.

As for "Testimonial Dinner Guilt", there's no use worrying about it. I'm sure I've played for at least a hundred of those (although I remember it as one very long one), and what you describe is more the norm than the exception.

These groups tend to be all Chiefs and no Indians, and all of the Chiefs must be recognized individually. This includes the Chief, the Vice Chief, the Adjutant Chief in Charge of Fundraising, the Past Chiefs Emeritus, the Sub-Chief for Community Affairs, their counterpart Chief-ettes in the Women's Auxiliary and their Brother and Sister Chieflings from lodges and associations across the land. This is not to mention the odd local politician and business leader.

I can remember one charity function in particular, a big one held at Terrace on the Park in the old World's Fair site. There was an announcement made that all of the honorees were to line up outside the room in preparation to march in as their names were called. At least 2/3 of the guests filed out.

It's best to find some comfy chairs away from the action.
_________________________
Greg Guarino

Top
#1681525 - 05/20/11 10:32 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
The close juxtaposition of Pest Control and Testimonial Dinner is too pointed to miss. But the craze for guys speaking over a microphone to strangers, they know not who or where, is an easy riddle to read. Their wives never let them get a word in edgeways at home. And the wives tend not to hang out in the radio shack, a room which defies redecorating, and in which they hear phrases like, "Honey, could you be quiet please--- I can't hear Japan."

What a party with such people would be like, I just can't think (even though I am one, with an FCC license and everything). They are a friendly bunch, at least. But, Tim, the Cordovox is interesting--- it almost sounds like something you would upholster a couch with (or vacuum it; or a trophy mount of the head of some rare African species; or a Dr. Seuss animal), but I think it is actually more closely aligned with the clavinet. However, the clavinet is a charming instrument: basically an electrified clavichord.

For some reason you don't hear much classical music played on clavinet, though (and even fewer weddings). Maybe the confusion about their family antecedents makes composers (and fathers-in-law) suspicious. Those keyed instruments with reeds: do they belong more to the clarinet, sax, or hautboy, or more to the harmonica and harmonium? Keyed instruments that strike tines or tuned bars... well, you see how the real pianos edge away from them at parties. You would think they were Pest Control Canapes.
_________________________
Clef


Top
#1682237 - 05/21/11 05:59 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17786
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
My 15 year old daughter is playing her first ever wedding gig right this very minute, as a member of the Lexington Flute Symphony. Why the bride chose a Flute Symphony for the music on her special day, rather than something much more sensible like the piano, I will never know. Contrary to popular belief, a flute does not produce a gentle melody floating on the breeze. Instead it produces a rather loud and strident air-blast akin to a warning siren. An entire symphony of flutes, and nothing but flutes, is capable of clearing out the most wax-clogged of ear canals. Trust me, this I know.

The venue for the wedding was also slightly odd, as it is taking place right smack dab in the grassy patch next to the rail at the Keeneland horse race track. On second thought, given that marriage itself is a gamble into which only the most intrepid souls dare enter, perhaps no better locale exists.

The weather, though hot (85 degrees), is cooperating, and the wedding coordinator did a nice job of creating a lovely aisle of rose petals indicating where the bride is to walk. I did not see the entire set list, but I know that an all-flute arrangement of Canon in D is in the works, along with a bit of Bach. For the wedding party's sake, I hope the symphony's rendition of "Moon River," a truly wretched arrangement with more key changes than should be legal for a five minute song, is omitted.
_________________________
Mason & Hamlin A -- 91997
My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/pianomonica

Top
#1682464 - 05/22/11 08:13 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
apple* Offline


Registered: 01/01/03
Posts: 19862
Loc: Kansas
"Pest Control Canapes"

odd that you would even think of that Jeff.... kind of like something they'd serve at a roach motel.

i really dislike key changes in kid music.. I sat through the grade school band end of the year concert last week.. eek.

carry on now. I've been in church way too much this week with 2 funerals (no fun unless you play), 1 graduation, 1 awards ceremony, a novena.. the mother of all prayer services (I played for my student so she could go ride her horse).. and now it is Sunday.
_________________________
accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)

Top
#1682577 - 05/22/11 01:16 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Piano Girl RMG Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 702
Loc: Germany
Pest control canapés, a novena, and an army of flutists playing Moon River? This thread is alive and kicking, folks. This is very funny stuff.

Monica, can you please get a recording of L'ensemble Flute playing Moon River in eighteen keys? I have been laughing about this all day. I'd say the budget-minded bride is quite inventive---hiring a bunch of kids to play in a field. Imagine being down wind of that sound! Oh, oh, the Pachelebel! Fantastico.

I have to tell you about my cookbook guys. They are, you know, a very nice but very persnickety group. I have played for them for something like nine years. They spend a lot of money, booking overnight rooms at the castle, and taking their entire party to the Michelin 3-star restaurant for dinner. Afterwards, they come to the bar for cognac and whatever. That's when I play for them—from midnight to two in the morning. Each year the event is quiet and classy and—even though it's late—a delight for me.

This year, I arrived at the castle at 11:30, horrified to see, I kid you not, a CONGA line of wedding guests (from another party) parading through the main hall of the castle, around the very grand piano I was scheduled to play. The bride was in the front, drunk as a skunk and singing at the top of her very developed lungs. June was bustin' out all over. Chaos at the castle. Who was responsible for this madness? There was another pianist in the back salon, running his piano through a flanger and using a playback of German carnival songs to crank the wedding party into a complete frenzy. I know, he was just doing his job, but since I was about to do mine, I was ready to gurk him.

All I could think of was my elegant (and slightly snooty) group of cookbook guys expecting to show up (in a matter of minutes) to listen to delicate music and sip brandy.

My colleagues are the best. I grabbed the banquet director, told him we had a potential disaster on our hands and got him to wrangle the bride and her braying group of dancers back into the salon. The bar man singlehandedly moved my piano (a Yamaha C-7) from the lobby into the bar—a job that involved rearranging the heavy bar furniture, removing one of the French doors on the bar, and taking the lid off the piano. With a flick of the wrist he tossed some rose petals on the piano and lit the votive candles just as the cookbook guys strolled into the bar, completely unaware of what had happened just minutes before.

I'm pretty good at acting relaxed even when I'm a wreck, so I put on my calm hostess face and greeted my cookbook guests. The good news? The adrenaline woke me up and I was able to get through the gig without my head crashing onto the keys. Periodically I would look over my shoulder, through the closed glass doors, and see the bride and her cohorts tumbling through the lobby in dancing clumps. But it was quiet in the bar. Just me, seventy-five Salvador Dali lithographs, and twenty-two cookbook guys.

On his break, the pianist from the wedding came in to the bar to say hello. "Wow," he said. "It's really quiet in here. We've got a party going on next door."

Before I left, I stopped in the salon to say goodbye to him. He was playing some German folk song and the bride, wearing the world's poofiest dress, was dancing by herself in little circles around the piano. She was singing a different song from what he was playing. How I wish I had had a video camera. It was CLASSIC BRIDE.

Sadly, I accidentally stepped on the train to her dress as I was leaving. But she didn't notice a thing.
_________________________
Robin Meloy Goldsby
www.goldsby.de
Author of PIANO GIRL: A Memoir
RHYTHM: A Novel
RMG is a Steinway Artist

Top
#1682582 - 05/22/11 01:27 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21660
Loc: Oakland
It is amazing how many places that have grand pianos also have doors just slightly narrower than the width of a grand piano. Julia Morgan should have known better!
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1682591 - 05/22/11 01:54 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: BDB]
Exalted Wombat Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 1197
Loc: London UK
Originally Posted By: BDB
It is amazing how many places that have grand pianos also have doors just slightly narrower than the width of a grand piano. Julia Morgan should have known better!


Even more amazing how (at least in the UK) a newly-purchased sofa or other large piece of furniture DOES just fit through the door, once you work out which way up to turn it! And how you CAN get that upright piano into the most unlikely upstairs, round-the-corner location!

Standard door sizes are a VERY good idea, and seem to have become established many years ago. And furniture makers know EXACTLY what those sizes are.

Top
#1682619 - 05/22/11 03:03 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
"The venue for the wedding was also slightly odd, as it is taking place right smack dab in the grassy patch next to the rail at the Keeneland horse race track. On second thought, given that marriage itself is a gamble into which only the most intrepid souls dare enter, perhaps no better locale exists."

Nicely said, Monica, and with admirable economy of expression. Maybe Clint Eastwood's recording of Cowboy Favorites would be the perfect unusual wedding gift for such an unusual wedding. My brother's chosen instrument was the Bb cornet, and anyone who has heard scales practiced on this instrument (or the flute--- and an ensemble of them, even more so) knows that the higher the ceiling, the better. And at any time of the day or night, either, for there is no knowing when the muse will favor the teenage cornetist. It could be Moon River, or some number by Chicago Transit Authority, or The Washington Post March.

Well, he grew up to be a high school band director, so there can be no complaining about that. And he plays weddings; you know, churches... big. The same space that drinks up the sound of the piano like water, reverberates artfully to the sound of a silver trumpet with an expensive mouthpiece.

I notice that out of charity you granted but a nod (and obliquely at that) that the happy couple wed at the racetrack, on the very day that Animal Kingdom failed to carry off the Triple Crown. It was close, though. As the poet has said,

"I took up all of my winnings,
And I gave my little Bessie half.
She tore it up and threw it in my face,
Just for a laugh."


I hope that their run for the roses will pay off, in despite of the odds.

Now, as for that conga line at the castle, with the braying bride. I don't think there is much left to say, except, maybe, that a poufy wedding dress can cover a multitude of sins--- but not all of them. But what a troupe of pros you have on staff there, to snatch that piano from the very jaws of a bacchanal. This is a very cinematic moment--- it would look great onscreen; the right director could mine this for platinum.
_________________________
Clef


Top
#1682627 - 05/22/11 03:22 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Exalted Wombat]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21660
Loc: Oakland
Originally Posted By: Exalted Wombat
Originally Posted By: BDB
It is amazing how many places that have grand pianos also have doors just slightly narrower than the width of a grand piano. Julia Morgan should have known better!


Even more amazing how (at least in the UK) a newly-purchased sofa or other large piece of furniture DOES just fit through the door, once you work out which way up to turn it! And how you CAN get that upright piano into the most unlikely upstairs, round-the-corner location!

Standard door sizes are a VERY good idea, and seem to have become established many years ago. And furniture makers know EXACTLY what those sizes are.


Well, you do run into some situations where something will not fit through a doorway. Old upright pianos used to split at the sides to fit through very narrow doorways, back in the days before there were minimum standards. There are a lot of places where pianos do not fit.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1682669 - 05/22/11 05:12 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
apple* Offline


Registered: 01/01/03
Posts: 19862
Loc: Kansas
yeah - drunk brides.. I don't want to say they are the worse things, but lets just hope there are not too many pictures.

I ran into my last one, Sharon, at one of the funerals.. she hugged me, she loved me, she tried to pay me twice with an offer for another check. She was drunk at the funeral too of course. She's the one who at the wedding said said "heck NO!" when the priest asked her 'would you love and honor your husband?'..they had already discussed leaving out the 'obey'.

edit: I'm not the one who wrote Heck.. the forum software did. the word I chose rhymed with bell.
_________________________
accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)

Top
#1682776 - 05/22/11 10:06 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Monica K. Offline

Platinum Supporter until Dec 31 2012


Registered: 08/10/05
Posts: 17786
Loc: Lexington, Kentucky
This has been a busy wedding weekend in Lexington. In addition to my daughter's gig (which went uneventfully, she tells me, phew!), a wedding made front page news here when the bride and groom's convertible was T-boned by a police cruiser that ran a red light:

Police cruiser hits convertible carrying wedding couple

Adding to the irony is that the police car was carrying a local citizen as part of the Citizen Police Academy program, wherein a community member gets to shadow a police officer for a week. The goal of the program is to promote goodwill and better communication among community and the police force. Somehow I think that mowing down a bride and groom is not exactly going to help advance that aim.

The poor bride was sent flying from the convertible, having apparently made the tragic decision that Just This Once she would not buckle her seat belt and ruin the appearance of her lovely gown. frown All told, five people from two cars were sent to the hospital. Fortunately nobody was hurt too seriously, but I think it is safe to say that this was NOT what the bride and groom had hoped for as a wedding night.
_________________________
Mason & Hamlin A -- 91997
My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/pianomonica

Top
#1682988 - 05/23/11 09:31 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: BDB]
gdguarino Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/20/07
Posts: 317
Loc: New York City
One of our former singers retired a few years ago and moved out west. I had never been to his house, but I am told he had made many unusual decorating choices. For one, he had done all the walls in wood paneling. All the walls. His rationale was that he would then never need to paint anything. This even extended to some of the window frames, as he had actually paneled right over a few windows.

How is this on topic, if this thread can be said to have a topic? It isn't, not directly anyway. Consider it character development before the main plot.

I didn't know he had a piano. He didn't play an instrument in the band, although I had occasionally seen him pick out a tune on guitar. The first I heard of his piano, a Steinway upright, was when he told us he had hacked it into small bits and put it out as trash.

He claimed that there was simply no other way to get it out of the house; it was too big for the openings. Did he think they had put the Steinway in first, and then built the house up around it? I asked him that, but such logic was lost on him.

Maybe he had paneled over a garage door somewhere and had simply forgotten it.
_________________________
Greg Guarino

Top
#1683022 - 05/23/11 10:54 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21660
Loc: Oakland
I have heard of someone who had an upright moved upstairs. Then the stairs were carpeted, and the piano would no longer fit coming downstairs. Most people never notice how small the perpendicular distance from the stairs to the overhead in an interior staircase can be.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1685827 - 05/28/11 12:48 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Piano Girl RMG Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 702
Loc: Germany
Greg, that wood paneling guy sounds like a trip. maybe he paneled himself into a corner?

Monica, what a harrowing story! Jeez.

I'm playing a wedding tonight. The bride requested all music from my recordings, so that's an easy gig for me. They seem like really nice people, so I doubt that anything bizarre will happen. But you never know. There's always a crazy Aunt Edna, Uncle Hoagie, or Cousin Jethrine hiding in the wings, waiting for a public occasion to create a spectacle.

I'll file a report tomorrow.
_________________________
Robin Meloy Goldsby
www.goldsby.de
Author of PIANO GIRL: A Memoir
RHYTHM: A Novel
RMG is a Steinway Artist

Top
#1686629 - 05/29/11 04:13 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
Let's Talk Riots:

Dateline Paris, May 29, 1913 – Take that, Belle Epoque: Le Sacre du Printemps, a ballet with music by Igor Stravinsky, was first performed at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris. Choreographed by Vaslav Njinski, produced by impresario Serge Diaghilev, with Pierre Monteux conducting under the Ballets Russes, and with original set design and costumes by archaeologist and painter Nicholas Roerich.

A riot. Though true that there was bickering backstage, which some say contributed to the tension in the front of the house, critics point to the onstage blood sacrifice as the firecracker which ignited the puddle of gasoline in the audience. "In denial," is all I can say to that; a vernal virgin sacrifice has a long and distinguished tradition in back of it, and you don't hear anyone making a fuss over, "An apple a day keeps the doctor away." From the apple's point of view, it's six of one--- and I can assure you that apples have sayings that run along the lines of, "A virgin a year keeps the gypsy moths clear."

The premiere was not heard at all over the din, though subsequent performances were uneventful even on the London stage, and the work has endured although actual virgins have become very scarce.

No doubt, our distinguished PianoWorld performance veterans know the story far better than I, so I'll leave my ridiculous opinion to do the best it can on its own. All I'll say is, no matter how badly your worst recent performance may have gone, look back to Sacre and count your lucky stars, because it could have been a lot worse.

Yet, Njinksy, Diaghlev and Stravinsky dined together after the performance and expressed their satisfaction. And 98 years later, we're still listening; I am, anyway. Right now.

______________________
Clef

PS- "...The bride was sent flying from the convertible..."

This is eerily like the Society Page coverage; they need only add, "The bride was sent flying from the convertible in a veil of white illusion trimmed with seed pearls, and an off-the-shoulder gown of silk charmeuse, with sateen half-pumps, the matron of honor said. Witnesses said she looked like a white-clad Superman as she jetted through the windshield, and was still clutching a bouquet of orchids, tulips, and white freesias as she fetched up on a telephone pole.

"It is not true that one is better off being thrown from the vehicle," officers at the scene said, "so buckle up, gown or no gown."

Oh wait, this is real--- in that case, it's not funny. I'm glad the bride was ok. Still, this is a Lets Talk Weddings classic, Monica. It was Sacre du Printemps all over again.

And in other Cautionary Tales News:
Dateline Bridezilla. First the bride paid for the hall with a phony credit card-- no go. Then she tried giving them a bad check--- no again. They insisted on cash, she balked saying she was too busy getting her toenails done to go to the bank. They told her that she and her toenails could get married on the sidewalk. In the end... I changed channels. I think she stuck Daddy with the bill.

It reminded me of that wonderful story of the groom's father picking the pocket of the bride's father and stealing all the cash for the hall rental. They only found out because it came up on someone's video footage. I want to hear more stories like that, lots more.

Though... there couldn't be lots more of those out there.


Edited by Jeff Clef (05/29/11 10:54 PM)
_________________________
Clef


Top
#1686835 - 05/30/11 01:23 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Jeff Clef]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21660
Loc: Oakland
You can read about it from one of the horse's mouths here.

I have also read Pierre Monteaux' comments in one of his wife's books. Another interesting take on the subject is Antheil's Bad Boy of Music, where he talks about being asked to play at a recital, and it becomes clear that the hosts were hoping a riot would break out. Antheil began bringing a gun to his concerts, which he would take out and lay on the piano within easy reach, just in case. How many of you wish that was politically correct nowadays?
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1686922 - 05/30/11 07:36 AM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Jeff Clef]
gdguarino Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/20/07
Posts: 317
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Jeff Clef
Let's Talk Riots:

All I'll say is, no matter how badly your worst recent performance may have gone, look back to Sacre and count your lucky stars, because it could have been a lot worse.



True. Rather like a high school dance. From the vantage point of a raised stage (or a group of cafeteria tables lashed together to simulate a stage), a HS Dance fight looks almost exactly like a magnet dropped into a dish of iron filings. All the kids are quickly sucked into a tightly-packed circle.


Quote:

This is eerily like the Society Page coverage; they need only add, "The bride was sent flying from the convertible in a veil of white illusion trimmed with seed pearls, and an off-the-shoulder gown of silk charmeuse, with sateen half-pumps, the matron of honor said. Witnesses said she looked like a white-clad Superman as she jetted through the windshield, and was still clutching a bouquet of orchids, tulips, and white freesias as she fetched up on a telephone pole.


Shame on you for that last bit, and shame on me for laughing so hard.
_________________________
Greg Guarino

Top
#1689479 - 06/02/11 07:43 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
Today in Wedding History:

June 2, 1886 – U.S. President Grover Cleveland married Frances Folsom in the White House, becoming the only president to wed in the executive mansion. Several presidential daughters, however, have also enjoyed White House weddings: Trishia Nixon comes to mind but only because the movie "Trisha's Wedding" was so vivid. I'm SURE the real ceremony was nothing like the movie.

June 2, 1904 – The birthday of Johnny Weissmuller, American swimming champion and actor (Tarzan). At five marriages Zsa Zsa and Liz have him beat, but five is up there, and they don't have six Olympic medals (five of them gold). As far as I know, there is no event for Divorcee Championship, though of course there is always the luge or the steeplechase.

Johnny passed away in 1984 at the age of 79, having broken his hip and a leg and finally succumbing to a heart condition. But I prefer to remember him for his first movie role in 1929, when he appeared as an Adonis, wearing only a fig leaf. You may think this showed great economy for the production's bottom line, but it is more tricky for the wardrobe department than you might realize. His Tarzan yell was a mixture of three blended voice recordings: a soprano, an alto, and a hog caller. Anyone who knows fig leaves knows that they are on the prickly side.

Retraction:
LTW by policy prints retractions and corrections which are brought to our attention. We recently reported that the bride who was thrown from the nuptial convertible, by the force with which the vehicle was t-boned, fetched up on a telephone pole. This was not the case; she actually fetched up on a newspaper rack. The telephone pole was undamaged. LTW regrets the error.


I hardly dare mention cucumbers on the "Let's Talk Weddings" thread, having gotten into serious trouble when the bride's mother overheard a private remark I made to another wedding guest, in regard to another guest's gift of a turkey baster. (This is why most of us stick to gravy boats, and let the turkey takes its chances.)

But, since Germany has borne the brunt of the recent mutant e. coli outbreak, and since cucumbers have been accused, I'd like to offer my best hopes for the good health of Robin and her family. And we thought salads were the way to get there! I include the extended family at the castle, and all the wedding parties in my good wishes. Honeymoon nightmare--- almost as bad as a car crash, if not worse.

We may speak lightly, but this illness can make you very sick, indeed, and I hope this dark angel has flapped elsewhere.

Speaking of hog calling, California's last e. coli contamination incident occurred when wild hogs broke into a field of spinach--- the most innocent place you could imagine. If only Popeye were not only a cartoon character! (I suspected his nemesis, Bluto, all along.) But who or what might be the nemesis of the cucumber, I can't even think. No, not going there.


Edited by Jeff Clef (06/03/11 06:36 PM)
_________________________
Clef


Top
#1689595 - 06/02/11 10:59 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21660
Loc: Oakland
The latest reports indicate that it was a bum rap. The cucumbers were not the culprits.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#1690074 - 06/03/11 06:48 PM Re: Let's Talk Weddings [Re: Piano Girl RMG]
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/05/08
Posts: 4425
Loc: San Jose, CA
The spinach growers made a fuss, too. And no doubt, it cost them a good few bucks. But when agribusiness's products are making people deathly ill--- well, I'm sorry if it costs them some money, but the German authorities had to do something, and fast. The protection of the public's health is their charge, not the protection of Spain's cucumber industry. Whoever the guilty culprit is discovered to be, they're not going to be all that happy about it.

But, the troubles will pass, and the world will smile on the cucumber again.
_________________________
Clef


Top
Page 33 of 53 < 1 2 ... 31 32 33 34 35 ... 52 53 >

Moderator:  sharpsandflats 
What's Hot!!
8 Live Ragtime Piano Players on the Cape!
-------------------
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Seiler Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
calling all users of Ivory II American D
by dire tonic
10/22/14 08:29 AM
Staying in one position for too long - tension
by DeadPoets
10/22/14 06:07 AM
Cleaning strings
by PhilipInChina
10/22/14 05:10 AM
recording digital piano
by johan d
10/22/14 03:38 AM
Ambitious Jazz beginner
by Ruan
10/22/14 01:10 AM
Who's Online
111 registered (Arizona Sage, Anne'sson, AZ_Astro, anamnesis, barbaram, 29 invisible), 1354 Guests and 19 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76610 Members
42 Forums
158410 Topics
2326310 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission