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#2035389 - 02/18/13 05:24 PM Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult
Desert Dweller Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/17/13
Posts: 8
I've started to meet with teachers for trial lessons. I'm having some trouble deciding what the best tact for me to take as a returning adult.

I was a typical child that played from early childhood through high school. I continued to dabble a bit in college and then didnt' touch a piano for 20 years. I was likely what would be considered an intermediate level player when I quit.

I've been dabbling a bit on my own the last month while trying to find a teacher. As an adult I'm understanding that really held me back when I was younger was technique issues...and understanding the music. Having benefitted from a few non-major music classes in college, and now having 20 more years of personal music appreciation under my belt, I better understand music which I think will help me "hear" what I should be playing.

I'm finding teachers have one of two approaches with me....one very unstructured - work from different pieces at different level(starting around Level 4) and work on a few simultaneously to focus on different techniques, scales, and challenges(have a "stretch" piece in the mix to work on long term).

Or a very structured system of method boooks, excercise books, scale work.

I'm not sure what is the best approach. I really would like to develop more "muscality" from improved technique. I'm not sure if this is best achieved through sctructured systems or not...and I'm not sure what level I should return back at.

Just curuious what teachers here find to be the best way to work with returning adults who aren't at the very beginning level but have been away from a piano for decades. And what advice you might have to offer a in finding a teacher?

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#2035438 - 02/18/13 06:53 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
ezpiano.org Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/10/11
Posts: 1010
Loc: Irvine, CA
If I am teaching you, I will put you:
15 minutes of lesson with structure, I will assign you a method book at your level, then religiously follow the method book.
Then,
15 minutes of lesson without structure. You will bring in any music that you like and we will learn it. If I found any parts that you need more explanation, or technical help, I will seek out some other resources to help you.
That would be our weekly 30 minutes lesson.
_________________________
http://ezpiano.org
Piano lessons in Irvine, CA
Watch the introduction video on YouTube
@ http://bit.ly/Ready123

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#2035453 - 02/18/13 07:23 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1351
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
Welcome to the board, Desert. And welcome back to the piano. Your question sounds reasonable: which plan of attack to make you a better player - highly structured versus less structured, with the former mode rooted less in pieces than in technical exercises.

EZ has offered an agreeable answer right down the middle, though I hope you will take longer lessons than 30 minutes.

But I think you need to keep taking trial lessons or interviews until you find a *relationship* that seems promising, and then go with this teacher for a few months and see what unfolds. You dropped piano long ago, I would wager, not because of your scales and chord patterns that were sluggish, but because you did not have a teacher who inspired you. And because you were not playing pieces that really turned your crank.

Furthermore, I would hope you would select a teacher - or a succession of teachers over the next few years - who will try to teach you according to *your* musical desires.

(Whispered advice: put pieces first, not exercises.)


Edited by Peter K. Mose (02/18/13 09:43 PM)

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#2035537 - 02/18/13 10:52 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
Desert Dweller Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/17/13
Posts: 8
Thanks for the welcome. You are correct, Peter K. Mose. My piano teacher retired right around my high school years and I never really had a teacher after that that "clicked". Maybe if i had been able to stay with that same teacher all those years I would have progressed and not felt like"i'm never goign to get better than this." I had a few friends in college that played in the symphony and I think I got discouraged as I wasn't seeing any progress while they were off touring...

I"m looking at 45-60 minute lesson. I work at a university so I've been able to get names of some graduate students and affiliated faculty that teach off campus and have met with a couple of them. I'm finding each seems to focus on the same things with me -how I physically play: using fingers, arms, body, etc and how that affects the music. I think they are all on the right track with me but eash such different manner of approaching and teaching the same things! I feel so uncertain about what might be the best road to try out...

I"m also trying to figure out how to say "no" to the ones I won't choose and not burn a bridge should I want to try lessons with them in the future. This seemed a lot easier when I was a kid and my mom found me a teacher! (OK a lot in life seemed easier when I was 10 then 45!)

Anyway, thanks for the input. I appreciate it. I"m enjoying being back at it. I've had a lot of stress the last couple years from a combination of graduate school for myself and caring for elderly parents...the piano has been calling to me recently and I believe is just what I need in life now. I just don't want to find myself frustrated and giving up again....!

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#2035584 - 02/19/13 12:44 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1351
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
Desert, please stay away from graduate students, and in general stay away from anyone connected to a university - *unless* their backgrounds happen to be either in music education or piano pedagogy: in these cases they might be worth an audition. In fact, generally speaking, I'd say stay away from any prospective teacher under about 35-40 years of age. You need a pro, and someone with life experience, not a beginner.

If you manage to find someone who actually has a background in adult learning, or who is comfortable with adult restarters, he or she will be closer to a good fit for you. There are precious few of us, though. Maybe four.

A public school music teacher or church organist would quite possibly suit you better than a piano teacher.

***

On the subject of saying "no," I would just pay for a single lesson with each of several teachers, and pick their brains for an hour. Don't tell them you are looking for a weekly teacher, even though you are: tell them you plan to study on your own, and need their assistance mapping a plan. This way you're not saying "no" to anyone, you're just taking a one-off lesson.

Then go back to your favorite teacher a few weeks later, and give him or her a try for a few months. If it doesn't quite click, move on to teacher #2.

Or you might find you don't need a weekly teacher after all.

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#2035656 - 02/19/13 04:18 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
theJourney Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/22/07
Posts: 3946
Loc: Banned
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
Desert, please stay away from graduate students, and in general stay away from anyone connected to a university - *unless* their backgrounds happen to be either in music education or piano pedagogy: in these cases they might be worth an audition. In fact, generally speaking, I'd say stay away from any prospective teacher under about 35-40 years of age. You need a pro, and someone with life experience, not a beginner.

If you manage to find someone who actually has a background in adult learning, or who is comfortable with adult restarters, he or she will be closer to a good fit for you.

+1

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#2035709 - 02/19/13 08:20 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11929
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
Desert, please stay away from graduate students, and in general stay away from anyone connected to a university - *unless* their backgrounds happen to be either in music education or piano pedagogy: in these cases they might be worth an audition. In fact, generally speaking, I'd say stay away from any prospective teacher under about 35-40 years of age. You need a pro, and someone with life experience, not a beginner.



I don't think age is really an issue here. I teach adult students and fit into this age category. Grad students, I agree, but why put a limit on age? I've been teaching for 15 years and DO have life experiences and am not a beginner.
_________________________
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#2035713 - 02/19/13 08:25 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
malkin Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/18/09
Posts: 2543
Loc: *sigh* Salt Lake City
In any field, grad students can be all over the map in experience, maturity, age and competence.
_________________________
A good student is one who makes the teacher feel like a good teacher.

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#2036661 - 02/20/13 11:16 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
panche23 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/28/07
Posts: 51
Loc: Arizona/Calif
Desert Dweller: I to am thinking of taking piano lessons for the first time in many years. If you are in the Phoenix area or anyone else for that matter that can recommend a piano teacher feel free to email me.

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#2036752 - 02/21/13 03:45 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
musicpassion Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 975
Loc: California, USA
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
Desert, please stay away from graduate students, You need a pro, and someone with life experience, not a beginner.


I agree you need someone with teaching experience - not just playing experience. Just because someone can play well doesn't mean they can teach.

However that graduate student might have plenty of teaching experience. You don't know until you ask.
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#2036756 - 02/21/13 03:59 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: malkin]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: malkin
In any field, grad students can be all over the map in experience, maturity, age and competence.

At the university I attended, some of the lower-division courses were taught by grad students, and they were way, way, way better teachers than some of the tenured professors! And I actually had one professor who freely admitted that grad students can actually be better, more effective teachers.

Age is just a number. Ability matters more.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2036761 - 02/21/13 04:31 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
ezpiano.org Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/10/11
Posts: 1010
Loc: Irvine, CA
Quote:
Age is just a number. Ability matters more.

Thank you ANZ.
_________________________
http://ezpiano.org
Piano lessons in Irvine, CA
Watch the introduction video on YouTube
@ http://bit.ly/Ready123

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#2036815 - 02/21/13 08:17 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: musicpassion]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11929
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: musicpassion
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
Desert, please stay away from graduate students, You need a pro, and someone with life experience, not a beginner.


I agree you need someone with teaching experience - not just playing experience. Just because someone can play well doesn't mean they can teach.

However that graduate student might have plenty of teaching experience. You don't know until you ask.


This is true. When I was a grad student I had already been teaching for 5 years and had worked with quite a few adult students. I would not have taken on an advanced or late intermediate student at that time, however.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2037125 - 02/21/13 06:01 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
dmd Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/15/09
Posts: 1865
Loc: Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
Desert, please stay away from graduate students


Agree completely.

In general, their motive for teaching is to supplement their income. They may be excellent players but they may be less than motivated to really work with you. Also, they will certainly be short term as they will almost always be graduating and moving on, elsewhere.

It is often best to find a teacher who is at least as old as you are. That improves the communication level during your lessons.





Edited by dmd (02/21/13 06:02 PM)
_________________________
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Current: ES7, Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 audio device, SennHeiser HD555 Phones, Focal CMS 40 Powered Monitors, Ravenscroft275, Ivory II American Concert D, Pianoteq 5

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#2037359 - 02/22/13 07:06 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11684
Loc: Canada
I am afraid that I disagree with most of this:
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose

But I think you need to keep taking trial lessons or interviews until you find a *relationship* that seems promising, and then go with this teacher for a few months and see what unfolds. You dropped piano long ago, I would wager, not because of your scales and chord patterns that were sluggish, but because you did not have a teacher who inspired you. And because you were not playing pieces that really turned your crank.

Furthermore, I would hope you would select a teacher - or a succession of teachers over the next few years - who will try to teach you according to *your* musical desires.

It so often happens that people get mediocre teaching first time round, where their first teacher simply went through material, focusing on the pieces, without giving much in the way of skills. When adults take lessons for the first time, they often get similar, because it's deemed to be a hobby. Or if they had lessons before, the emphasis goes to more advanced pieces, rather than missing skills. (Assuming poor first teaching). Why not go after the skills, rather than "the music we like" or something vague like "inspiring" teachers. I'll tell you that learning IS inspiring. When we find out how to do things, it is magical. No great personality can match that. And how wonderful that person can play is also useless, unless s/he knows how to pass on the skills.

There is nothing magical-inspiring about music we love. In fact, it can be discouraging, if the skills are not there. Music we love doesn't just "make" us suddenly be able to play. Yes, maybe we'll practice and practice until our fingers are worn to the bone if we love the piece, but if we don't know HOW to practice, how to approach the piece, how to develop or skills, this can actually be soul-destroying rather than inspiring.

The ABF ran two surveys some years ago. In both of them, a large proportion of the adult students said that they wished their teachers focused more on technique and theory, and stopped focusing so much on pieces. They wanted more formal things, more structure. All that time I thought I was alone, because I always read about what "we" adults want. And here it is again: pieces we like playing, and a nice teacher personality.
===============================
Here is what I would look for, short and simple:

A teacher who can identify what skills I'm missing, and what present habits are blocking me from playing better, and who has a plan on how to get me there. If it's mainly through pieces, fine. Just make sure those pieces are geared toward my learning needs, rather than my tastes.

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#2037377 - 02/22/13 08:14 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11929
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I am bothered by the age discrimination that seems to be prevalent in this thread. Who cares about the age? I know of old teachers who are awful...one old lady who would sip at her nipper bottle during her $5/half hour lesson and fall asleep most of the time while the student plays.

I agree with keystring: the most importnat thing is to find someone that can help you attain your goals in piano, one who knows what skills you need in order to play what you want to play. Start getting picky about age and eye color and things like that and you make your search harder.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2037458 - 02/22/13 11:30 AM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: keystring]
malkin Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/18/09
Posts: 2543
Loc: *sigh* Salt Lake City
Originally Posted By: keystring


Here is what I would look for, short and simple:

A teacher who can identify what skills I'm missing, and what present habits are blocking me from playing better, and who has a plan on how to get me there. If it's mainly through pieces, fine. Just make sure those pieces are geared toward my learning needs, rather than my tastes.


Thanks for this keystring; it's my new goal!!
_________________________
A good student is one who makes the teacher feel like a good teacher.

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#2037496 - 02/22/13 12:29 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Morodiene]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5486
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I am bothered by the age discrimination that seems to be prevalent in this thread. Who cares about the age?

I agree completely. The age discrimination is unwarranted and, in fact, quite ridiculous.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2037509 - 02/22/13 12:59 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: AZNpiano]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3200
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I am bothered by the age discrimination that seems to be prevalent in this thread. Who cares about the age?

I agree completely. The age discrimination is unwarranted and, in fact, quite ridiculous.


I agree, still a certain amount of experience is required to learn your craft. It's a necessary but not sufficient condition.

I wish I could gain experience without simultaneously aging, but that has proved difficult.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#2037521 - 02/22/13 01:28 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: malkin]
spanishbuddha Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2359
Loc: UK
Originally Posted By: malkin
Originally Posted By: keystring


Here is what I would look for, short and simple:

A teacher who can identify what skills I'm missing, and what present habits are blocking me from playing better, and who has a plan on how to get me there. If it's mainly through pieces, fine. Just make sure those pieces are geared toward my learning needs, rather than my tastes.


Thanks for this keystring; it's my new goal!!

+1 I'm an Adult Beginner of forever in need of a teacher, and with some small rewording it succinctly describes what I want in a teacher.

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#2037533 - 02/22/13 02:01 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: spanishbuddha]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3200
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
Originally Posted By: malkin
Originally Posted By: keystring


Here is what I would look for, short and simple:

A teacher who can identify what skills I'm missing, and what present habits are blocking me from playing better, and who has a plan on how to get me there. If it's mainly through pieces, fine. Just make sure those pieces are geared toward my learning needs, rather than my tastes.


Thanks for this keystring; it's my new goal!!

+1 I'm an Adult Beginner of forever in need of a teacher, and with some small rewording it succinctly describes what I want in a teacher.


Sounds like a pretty good description of anybody should want. It's almost the definition of a quality teacher.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#2037588 - 02/22/13 04:05 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1351
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
1. If the pieces a teacher selects, especially for an adult learner, do not turn the student on, it doesn't matter how well suited these pieces may be to one's learning needs. This would not be a fine start to a new teacher-student relationship, and the chances are that it won't last long.

2. I didn't imagine it to be controversial, the idea that one gets better as a piano teacher over the years. The best ones are not in their teens and twenties. AZN and Morodiene are better teachers today than they were five or ten years ago, and will be better still in another five or ten years. So in this sense age does indeed matter, when one is sifting through the names of piano teachers to study with.

It probably matters even more when teaching adults.





Edited by Peter K. Mose (02/22/13 04:06 PM)

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#2037600 - 02/22/13 04:29 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3200
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose


2. I didn't imagine it to be controversial, the idea that one gets better as a piano teacher over the years.


Maybe not exactly controversial - but certainly not a given either. Some improve steadily, some improve to a point, some never improve. Eventually all of us fade with age, as vision, hearing, and memory fade.

Quote:
The best ones are not in their teens and twenties.


That seems reasonable.

Quote:
AZN and Morodiene are better teachers today than they were five or ten years ago,


Yup.

Quote:
and will be better still in another five or ten years.


Probably those two, yes, but it's far from universal. Not everybody continues to improve, not everybody works at it. Improvement doesn't happen by osmosis, beyond the early years.

In my field (engineering) I see large improvements the first five years of experience. Then it tapers off over maybe the next ten. And while it's embarassing to admit, continued improvement among the older crowd is the exception, not the rule.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#2037608 - 02/22/13 04:44 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Peter K. Mose]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11684
Loc: Canada
As an adult student, and also having talked to peers
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
1. If the pieces a teacher selects, especially for an adult learner, do not turn the student on, it doesn't matter how well suited these pieces may be to one's learning needs.

I know that this is absolutely untrue for at least some of us. I don't know what proportion. It is also somewhat insulting to suggest that we need to be "turned on" by music before we can learn, or are willing to work on things.
Quote:

This would not be a fine start to a new teacher-student relationship, and the chances are that it won't last long.

I guarantee that especially of a teacher's primary goal was to find what music I like and based himself on that, that this relationship wouldn't even start. If he chooses pieces that will help me learn those things that are necessary, and those pieces happen to be music that I will also like, of course that is wonderful. But it's not an absolute necessity.

The thing which causes lessons to fail is poor teaching.

Quote:

I didn't imagine it to be controversial, the idea that one gets better as a piano teacher over the years.

That is not what you said. You said that an older teacher is preferable over a younger one, and set age as a criterion.
Quote:

It probably matters even more when teaching adults.

In fact, for adults age might indeed matter. One might want to avoid older teachers who have outmoded ideas about the limitations or supposed wishes of adult students. grin Fortunately things have shifted over the last decade.

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#2037609 - 02/22/13 04:46 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11684
Loc: Canada
The idea that the CRITERIA for selecting a teacher should be primarily based on whether that teacher will:
- give you the pieces that you like
- it's based on personality

and at the same time, there is NO mention of skills or goals

is highly disturbing. I was hoping that such things were long gone, and that we had moved forward from there. frown

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#2037612 - 02/22/13 04:53 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: dmd]
malkin Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/18/09
Posts: 2543
Loc: *sigh* Salt Lake City
Originally Posted By: dmd
Originally Posted By: Peter K. Mose
Desert, please stay away from graduate students

Agree completely.
In general, their motive for teaching is to supplement their income.


Really? Graduate students are trying to make money, but the rest of you are teaching for altruistic reasons?

Originally Posted By: dmd
They may be excellent players but they may be less than motivated to really work with you. Also, they will certainly be short term as they will almost always be graduating and moving on, elsewhere.


Or they may be highly motivated, highly experienced, highly competent and enrolled in a lengthy program.

Anyone can select a teacher for whatever reason including size, shape, color, age or affiliation, but keeping an open mind may allow a wider choice of qualified instructors.
_________________________
A good student is one who makes the teacher feel like a good teacher.

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#2037653 - 02/22/13 05:59 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Desert Dweller Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/17/13
Posts: 8
Thank you to everyone for your input. A lot of points have been brought up here that are interesting.

I didn't go into a lot of details above but will say it was very important for me in looking for a teacher to find someone that would really concentrate on technique and theory...for the reason mentioned above, to break through the obstacles that held me back when I was young. I work at a university with a well-recognized music program that includes a pedagogy program. I had contacted the director of that for some suggestions on names and that's how I ended up with a list of names of doctoral students and faculty to talk to.

The caliber of the people I have met with - garduate student or otherwise - has been really impressive and well beyond what my teachers when I was younger were able to offer me. Having been a graduate TA myself I understand some of what was mentioned above - some graduate students take on the TA position as a means to live and aren't interested in nor focused on the teaching part. Myself, I had a goal to teach, and loved the work but I know I was unusual within my cohort in that regards. Had any of the people I met with been of this ilk I wouldn't have considered them, but those names I was given were doctoral students who had solid experience teaching and interest in teaching. I don't think any blanket statement can necessarily be used.

I did select a teacher to try and work with and am looking forward to moving forward with lessons. She is an accomplished performer and accompaniest, former faculty at the university, and has had a teaching studio locally for many years. She offered me what I feel is a good combination of focus on technique and theory along with a solid, but flexible, structure within which we would work. It was actually hard to make a decision.


Edited by Desert Dweller (02/22/13 06:01 PM)

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#2037666 - 02/22/13 06:30 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
When I was a TA, I already had 6-7 years of teaching experience and teaching was my primary goal, though I was majoring in performance for my masters. I had a thorough undergraduate training in pedagogy and music ed in my BA. I was assigned many different kinds of adult students as a TA, including a college professor from the linguistics department. It was a great experience and he signed up for more semesters with me.

Sure I'm a better teacher now than I was 25 years ago, but I was pretty good then! smile

There has to be a balance of goals/skills and repertoire.
_________________________
B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#2037676 - 02/22/13 06:54 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3160
Originally Posted By: Desert Dweller
I did select a teacher to try and work with and am looking forward to moving forward with lessons. She is an accomplished performer and accompaniest, former faculty at the university, and has had a teaching studio locally for many years. She offered me what I feel is a good combination of focus on technique and theory along with a solid, but flexible, structure within which we would work. It was actually hard to make a decision.


Sounds excellent. I love working with adults, including returning adults. If typically there is one thing that they lack, it is solid technique and theory. And, there is often an aversion to doing that work, but it is the foundation for true progress.

_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

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#2037725 - 02/22/13 09:09 PM Re: Advice on finding a teacher for returning adult [Re: Desert Dweller]
Bobpickle Offline

Gold Supporter until July 10  2014


Registered: 05/24/12
Posts: 1383
Loc: Cameron Park, California
Such a terrific thread. I think the advice and contributions made by some of the members here epitomize how great these forums truly are.

The best of luck to you, Desert.

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