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#2065802 - 04/17/13 01:29 AM What is repeated is hardwired
JosephAC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/23/12
Posts: 168
Loc: Melbourne Australia
Today, I attended a presentation on the brain and I have found the content quite relevant to learning music.
Apparently, the brain hardwires everything it can:
• Working memory
– 20 minutes of concentration is the limit
– 4 bits of information leads to overload
– Energy intensive, small, serial, fussy
• Long term memory
– Everything is pushed into long term memory
– What is repeated is hardwired
– Trillions of pieces of information hardwired
– Brain wants to automate processes
– Work will be completed faster, more effectively and at a lower metabolic level & takes less energy.

Having said that, how do you go about learning to play 100% accurately first time albeit at slow rate/motion?
My teacher keeps telling me that a hesitation is a mistake waiting to happen. Do you hesitate? How do you deal with your hesitations?

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#2065803 - 04/17/13 01:31 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Whizbang Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/27/12
Posts: 735
1) Imperfectly, at best.
2) Yes.
3) Poorly, but I try to smooth things out. There are cheats.


Edited by Whizbang (04/17/13 01:31 AM)
_________________________
Whizbang
amateur ragtime pianist

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#2065805 - 04/17/13 01:39 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
earlofmar Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/21/13
Posts: 1392
Loc: Australia
Very interesting but alas I am not hearing a quick fix from beginner, (that's me) to talented multi-instumentalist/composer/all round nice person (that's also me but in a parallel universe).
_________________________
I thought I understood endurance sport; then I took up piano
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#2065825 - 04/17/13 02:28 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
casinitaly Offline


Gold Supporter until March 1 2014


Registered: 03/01/10
Posts: 4869
Loc: Italy
I think that 20 minutes attention time is actually a high estimate. I'd put it more at 11 minutes!

As for hesitations - my teacher doesn't care about them - he's focused on getting the notes right at the beginning.
If my teacher isn't bothered by them, I'm not...and so I suppose the reverse is true --- your teacher thinks they are terrible, and now you're concerned.

However, if the goal is to first "walk your way" through a piece and settle on the fingering and get it all right it seems to me that it is virtually impossible to avoid hesitations.

At a certain point in the development of the piece they can become problematic--- but if you have studied well to have the correct fingering right from the start, they should happen less.

When I work on my pieces I don't even worry about the note value or the tempo for a bit (I may have it right, I may not....it isn't relevant at first)... just get the fingerings sorted out, play through a few times to understand where the tricky bits are. Focus on the tricky bits, then start working on sets of measures.

What is repeated is hardwired.....more or less. If you've repeated a mistake, you CAN fix it, but it is really hard to do (speaking from experience!)
_________________________
XVIII-XXXIV
Everything's too hard until you make it easy. Follow your teacher's instructions and practice wisely/much, and you'll soon wonder how you ever found it hard ;)-BobPickle
Performance anxiety: make it part of your daily routine and deal with it...Cope! zrtf90

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#2065827 - 04/17/13 02:36 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Bobpickle Offline

Gold Supporter until July 10  2014


Registered: 05/24/12
Posts: 1383
Loc: Cameron Park, California
Originally Posted By: JosephAC
Having said that, how do you go about learning to play 100% accurately first time albeit at slow rate/motion?


You can learn to play 100% accurately only because you're playing in slow motion, not in spite of it. If you mean doing this at full tempo, then this is sight-reading and this requires a great deal of experience and practice of a very different kind. I believe a user here once quoted their teacher in saying, "anyone can play Grieg's Piano Concerto 1 perfectly the first time, if they go slow enough."

Originally Posted By: JosephAC
My teacher keeps telling me that a hesitation is a mistake waiting to happen. Do you hesitate?


It depends if I'm letting my ego lead my practicing and trying to play faster than I'm able - if this is the case, then yes, there's a lot of hesitation and no, it's not healthy.

Originally Posted By: JosephAC
How do you deal with your hesitations?


Break your pieces you're studying into very small bites and practice them very slowly and methodically; if you know in your conscious mind what you're doing in the present and precisely what you need to do next, you leave no room for hesitation (you achieve his by taking small bites and practicing them slowly).

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#2065847 - 04/17/13 03:56 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
PaperClip Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/21/09
Posts: 505
Loc: Amsterdam, Holland
My teacher doesn't allow me doing hesitations. You need to know where the music is going. Otherwise the fingers search for the right key and that is not productive for learning a good technique.

What works best for me is to take a single measure. Then I learn the technique how to play. The right technique forms a muscle image in memory. That will be executed when playing. When I still hesitates, I go back to that single measure and practise it again.
_________________________
Chris

Playing since May 02 2009

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#2065872 - 04/17/13 06:45 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2310
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: JosephAC
– 20 minutes of concentration is the limit
– 4 bits of information leads to overload

Concentration is limited but varies from individual to individual. You have to find your own limit.

We can store 4 to 7 bits of information in short term memory but by 'chunking' we can increase the size of each bit. Seven individual notes may be the limit for a beginner or five notes and two time values. A more experienced player may take seven chords or by recognising familiar patterns, seven measures or even seven sections.

Again, you have to learn your own limit. I find that if I can't memorise a passage in two minutes it's too much for me but if I learn each hand separately I can do more and put them together from memory faster than trying to learn the passage hands together. We all have our own ways of going about it. You can get lucky or you can try different ways and (importantly) record (and compare) your progress. Also you can stay unlucky and just keep playing your pieces through! smile

Originally Posted By: JosephAC
Having said that, how do you go about learning to play 100% accurately first time albeit at slow rate/motion?
There are two ways.

When the notes are sequential, as in a Bach invention, it involves holding down the current note, reading the next note, covering that note with the next finger then playing that note and holding it while you read the next. Knowing the next note and covering it is the key to 100% accuracy.

For easy passages and scale-like runs you can do this in hand groups. For difficult passage you have to stay slow and work on small sections until the muscular difficulties have been overcome. It's the slow (= unmusical, unrhythmic) mechanical solution that is psychologically hard but it pretty much guarantees success. You just have to trust that it will get quicker - which it does - by keeping the section small and manageable.

The second way is when the whole hand has to change and the same finger(s) is/are used. The next finger can't cover the note because it can't reach or it's still in use. The left hand of a Chopin Nocturne or rag-time comes to mind, or Liszt's La Campanella as an extreme example. Here you have to learn the next note/chord and keeping holding on to the current note/chord until the last moment. Instead of covering the note(s) with your fingers, you have to cover it mentally and then jump to it.

Again you have to subjugate the tempo and rhythmic indications until you have conquered the mechanical difficulties. Learn to do it first, then do it rhythmically and finally do it in tempo.

I prefer to do these things with appropriate dynamics and phrasing first. Others prefer to leave the dynamics and expression until later but I find that appropriate dynamics can be the thing that makes the passage difficult in the first place, especially when rhythm and accompaniment are in the same hand. To each his own.

Originally Posted By: JosephAC
My teacher keeps telling me that a hesitation is a mistake waiting to happen. Do you hesitate? How do you deal with your hesitations?
And this one's in four parts.

1) When I'm memorising, a hesitation is a mistake being avoided! laugh My solution is to start with a couple of beats before the hesitant section and gradually move one beat further every few repetitions.

2) When I'm reading familiar material, a hesitation is a passage that needs isolated study.

3) When I'm sight reading it's because I've lost concentration and focus and it's time to stop and rest or I may need to slow down.

4) When I'm accompanying, slowing down is not an option. I keep my foot going and get the bass notes in on the beat and gradually add the material above as I marshal the resources to get my act together. I might try to save face by pretending to stifle a sneeze smile
_________________________
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#2065873 - 04/17/13 06:48 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
What a wonderful post.

JosephAC, I have read your post, here:

Today, I attended a presentation on the brain and I have found the content quite relevant to learning music.
Apparently, the brain hardwires everything it can:
• Working memory
– 20 minutes of concentration is the limit
– 4 bits of information leads to overload
– Energy intensive, small, serial, fussy
• Long term memory
– Everything is pushed into long term memory
– What is repeated is hardwired
– Trillions of pieces of information hardwired
– Brain wants to automate processes
– Work will be completed faster, more effectively and at a lower metabolic level & takes less energy.

Having said that, how do you go about learning to play 100% accurately first time albeit at slow rate/motion?
My teacher keeps telling me that a hesitation is a mistake waiting to happen. Do you hesitate? How do you deal with your hesitations?


_______________________________________________


At some time when I was young I was told I was dyslexic. It could have been at the time of my first report card - failed grades 1 and 3.

It was probobably in my 40s that I really tried to understand my brain because I wanted to learn all sorts of stuff like music and computer languages, programming and I could learn them but I had to do it in a way my brain would be a able to work with the information.

Specifically, with respect to music, it has been very interesting. I learned that I can last about 20 minutes - or less of learning a new piece. So several times a day I go to the piano bench to play for short periods.

When I started learning piano a year ago, I would learn a piece which as we all know is about 4 measures long and I would repeat that everyday and only move on to the next page or piece when I could play the piece without mistakes. Of course, that would vary from page to page and piece to piece. I have used the method for the entire year and will probably do it until I drop dead. The next step was to play the first piece as warmup and then learn the second piece until I could play it without mistakes and then learn the third piece, and repeat the first and second piece as warm up and learn the third piece. So you get the idea. The gift, is you will, and the surprise, is that when I finished book 1, Leila Fletcher Piano course book 1, (easy) of learning the piano. Then I moved to book 1 of John Thompson Modern Course Book 1, (challenging) - but I had no problem. It was a smooth transition because I had a solid foundation of play and recognizing the notes because I had - have played all the music I have ever played over and over countless times and still do it to this day. I realized that since I know the notes, I just have to read and play the music over and over without mistakes over many weeks and months. It is that easy, slow, but fun. I recently learned that I can work through a piece and play it so slowly that I can move my finger note by note / beat by beat in a measure carefully without making a mistake - sometimes - often - my fingers are in mid air between each note as I play note by note. The key is that - at no time - do I play a wrong note. So to repeat, for the benefit of the brain, I play, if I have to a new piece or at any time so slowly that my fingers press - stike the key correctly. So it is just as you said in your post that when you give information to the brain, it hard wires it.

Also, I recently had surgery and could not play much, if anything, for about 3 months not because of pain but discomfort after 6 and half hours of surgery. Even though I had play all the music everday for a year, it took me almost as long, 3 months to get back to playing the pieces without mistakes or hesitation. So it is important to remember that playing every day is critical.

It is interesting to read about hesitation. When I play a piece, it can be slowly and speed up bit by bit but there can be no hesitation. That is why my fingers are in mid air as I crawl through a measure of smoothly and slowly continuing through the measure without hesitation, so to speak.

I freak out if I have hesitation because it just should not happen. I stop and examine the measure why I hesitated, for note recognition, timing and I pull the piece aside and give if extra attention and then return the piece back to the the play everyday review pile of music. So like your posting said, hesitation is serious, a mistake.

So that is what I have learned so far as a beginner about piano and the brain.



Edited by Michael_99 (04/17/13 07:13 AM)

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#2065890 - 04/17/13 07:49 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Andy Platt Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2375
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: JosephAC
Having said that, how do you go about learning to play 100% accurately first time albeit at slow rate/motion?
My teacher keeps telling me that a hesitation is a mistake waiting to happen. Do you hesitate? How do you deal with your hesitations?


Hesitation only happens if you are going too quickly (slow it down even more) or have finally gone so slowly that you fell asleep.

OK, that part is a little trite obviously. It takes concentration and slow play to get it right. I find that combination very challenging as I'm sure most of us do.

It's the first point that's key most of the time. Where do we hesitate? Where the patterns change. I have an ascending scale and suddenly hop down a fourth. Ooops, hesitation. I have a simple melody and suddenly two 16th notes. Ooops, hesitation. Or, my personal killer, they rhythm changes. Or perhaps I get a "new chord". etc., etc..

All of which just mean we started too quickly and couldn't look ahead enough to process the changes.
_________________________
  • Liszt - Liebestrume No. 3, S541
  • Scarlatti - Sonata in D minor, K. 213

Kawai K3

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#2065912 - 04/17/13 08:41 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
sinophilia Offline

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014


Registered: 06/26/12
Posts: 943
Loc: Italy
Excellent stuff! I recently realized that it's better not to make any mistakes from the very beginning, even if it means going at a snail pace and/or playing hands separate, instead of trying to play through something to get the feel of it (unless it's sight-reading).

What I haven't been able to understand yet is how to move from slow practice to fast practice in an effective way. Some advise increasing the speed gradually, but this will almost certainly introduce mistakes or at least hesitations. Getting a piece up to tempo is by far my biggest problem right now. Maybe I don't do it gradually enough or I don't work on 'fractures' (problematic sections, see Cooke) long enough before putting things together.

Graham Fitch talks about 'Little Bits Fast', but I haven't reached that part of his book yet.
_________________________
Diana & Wally - Yamaha W110BW
Martha Argerich... is an incarnation of the artistic metaphor of the "eternal feminine" that draws us upward. (Sergio Sablich)

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#2065913 - 04/17/13 08:49 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
JosephAC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/23/12
Posts: 168
Loc: Melbourne Australia
Thanks all for your generous and insightful responses. I need some time to digest them and incorporate them into my practice.

Michael 99, I aspire to be able to adopt your approach for 100 % accurately with no hesitation. How long did it take you to develop this ability ? Do you still experience resistance to practice slowly ? I have found difficult to control the mind ? I am still trying understand how to separate the self from the mind ?

BTW, how would you describe the transition from slow motion to average tempo ? Dd it happen naturally and easily ?

I heard somewhere that for every day that you miss practice piano, you lose the gain of previous days. I am not sure how true it is.

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#2065914 - 04/17/13 08:51 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3156
Loc: Maine
I am finding that I have to be extremely patient about getting things up to the tempo I would like them to be. It's almost like I have to accept that my VERY SLOW tempo is going to be the final tempo, and practice the piece for a VERY LONG time at that slow tempo. Then one day, when I've all but forgotten about my initial desire to play it faster, I'll try it a bit faster and discover that I can. Then I go back to a lot more SLOW PRACTICE, lather, rinse, repeat.

If I'm continually testing "Can I push it faster today? Can I push it faster today? Can I push it faster today?" I don't get anywhere, and probably get worse.
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#2065917 - 04/17/13 08:55 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: sinophilia]
Andy Platt Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2375
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: sinophilia
Excellent stuff! I recently realized that it's better not to make any mistakes from the very beginning, even if it means going at a snail pace and/or playing hands separate, instead of trying to play through something to get the feel of it (unless it's sight-reading).

What I haven't been able to understand yet is how to move from slow practice to fast practice in an effective way. Some advise increasing the speed gradually, but this will almost certainly introduce mistakes or at least hesitations. Getting a piece up to tempo is by far my biggest problem right now. Maybe I don't do it gradually enough or I don't work on 'fractures' (problematic sections, see Cooke) long enough before putting things together.

Graham Fitch talks about 'Little Bits Fast', but I haven't reached that part of his book yet.


This is one of those areas where you will receive conflicting advice. Some will say if you have properly learned it slowly, it will just go to tempo and if it doesn't you didn't learn it correctly slowly. Others will say, "rubbish!" you need to increase the tempo gradually and fix any points at which it breaks.

And most of us will say do whatever works for you. I suspect (though I haven't read Graham Fitch's book) that what he will suggest is getting each chunk up to tempo, depending on the complexity of that chunk.

One thing I will say. It takes a long time for technique, brain-hand coordination and general pianistic ability for us to develop the ability to perform fast passages. It seems to me children pick this up quicker than adults. Or perhaps it's just me that's slow. But in any case, trying to get a piece faster than your current technique allows won't work. It's not bad to play things slower.

I never did get Debussy's Arabesque number one to the crazy speed that most performers use. Of course, I read the tempo Andantino Con Moto instead of others who seem to read Presto! wink But I made it musical and it sounds fine as is. If I had tried to perform it much faster it would have been a huge mess and nobody would have liked it.
_________________________
  • Liszt - Liebestrume No. 3, S541
  • Scarlatti - Sonata in D minor, K. 213

Kawai K3

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#2065922 - 04/17/13 09:21 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
JonathonRose Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 03/16/13
Posts: 12
Loc: Berkshire,london
Hesitation comes due to 2 major reasons 1- want to learn eagerly and 2- You afraid that you can't servive.So make yourself calm by practicing day by and it will help you to remove your hesitation.

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#2066065 - 04/17/13 03:26 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Sand Tiger Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/25/12
Posts: 990
Loc: Southern California
A couple of minor points. There is a difference between playing slow vs. hesitation. Scale work can help. If person can't play a simple scale at a certain tempo, the odds of playing a piece at that speed, keeping an even tempo, is slim.

The tempo comes slowly, but it does come. That said, a beginner will have to work up to playing smoothly and flawlessly at the faster written tempos. Most beginner level pieces sound okay slower. Again, slow and even is different from hesitation, the latter means the tempo is uneven.

As for losing progress, not so much on piano. A day or two off is often reported as being a good thing by many on the forum. It is different for woodwinds or any embouchure instrument. For wind, every day off does tend to cost a person.


Edited by Sand Tiger (04/17/13 08:18 PM)
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#2066180 - 04/17/13 06:55 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
Very funny!

JosephAC, I have read your post, here:

Thanks all for your generous and insightful responses. I need some time to digest them and incorporate them into my practice.

Michael 99, I aspire to be able to adopt your approach for 100 % accurately with no hesitation. How long did it take you to develop this ability ? Do you still experience resistance to practice slowly ? I have found difficult to control the mind ? I am still trying understand how to separate the self from the mind ?

BTW, how would you describe the transition from slow motion to average tempo ? Dd it happen naturally and easily ?

I heard somewhere that for every day that you miss practice piano, you lose the gain of previous days. I am not sure how true it is.

___________________________________________

Remember, I have learning difficulties, so I may never be able to play at tempo. And even though I go on and on and on about going slowly, I still have to go slower because it is natural to go faster than you should.

Once you know the names of the notes, you simply play the first note in the measure or the first notes in the measure, being a treble and bass clef, play that and then look at the next note in the measure, being beat 2, etc. and play that, etc.
So I really play by beats of the measure, but understand that that beat one can have 2 8th notes, so 1 + , etc. I think that as you slow down you realize that you can show down even more. The benefit of going slower, too, is that you can go as slow as you want and then you are totally relaxed playing the measure because you play under control.

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#2066517 - 04/18/13 11:53 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Mickb Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/01/13
Posts: 14
One thing that resonates with me in the OP is the 20 minutes of concentration thing. I'm only a beginner but I've found I make my best progress by practicing several times a day for short periods. i.e I get a lot more out of 4 x 15 minutes spread out through the day than sitting down for an hour solid, no matter how much I try to mix that hour up.

I find this means each time I take to the piano I am fresh, I can often find that even within a single day, something I am struggling with at the end of a fifteen minute session comes much easier at the start of the next fifteen minute session a few hours later.

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#2066594 - 04/18/13 03:03 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: Mickb]
JosephAC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/23/12
Posts: 168
Loc: Melbourne Australia
This is a good point.
Not all of us have access to the piano all day to break up my practice into sessions of 20 min. If you work full time, how would you schedule your piano session?

My available time for piano is between 5:00 and 7:30 in the morning or after 7:00 in the evening.

I am keen to hear your views on how your break up your 20 minutes session for morning and evening time. Will 5 minutes break after every 20 minutes will do ? And what about the variety of what you practice? And how you will stagger them ?


Edited by JosephAC (04/18/13 03:04 PM)

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#2067012 - 04/19/13 09:50 AM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Mickb Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/01/13
Posts: 14
I do work full time but I am fairly flexible about when I practice. For example, if I have 15 minutes at breakfast to play I will take it. I can sometimes sneak home at lunchtime to do another 15-30 minutes. When I come home I might play again while having a cup of tea or something. Then I generally like to spend some time with my son and when he has gone to bed I might play for another 15-30 minutes.

At the weekends I mgiht get the opportunity to stretch some of those sessions and do more (but often if I do take the sessions to over 30 minutes I feel like the quality of the practice gets poorer and poorer).

So if I do practice for longer periods, this extra time is usually spent lets say figuring out the notes or fingering for a new piece..stuff like scales arepeggios and perfecting pieces I already know I save for when I am fresh in a session.

This is only what works for me though, I'm sure others prefer long 2 hour sessions at a stretch.

Incidentally, considering this post started off with a lecture on the workings of the brain, it has literally just occurred to me as I'm writing this that the way I practice piano is the way I used to Study when I was younger. (not patting myself on the back but I was academically gifted and got exceptional results, but with very little study. I used to use these same methods while my friends would do 6 hour cramming sessions). I am sure there is something in this.

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#2067192 - 04/19/13 03:41 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
JosephAC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/23/12
Posts: 168
Loc: Melbourne Australia
Thanks Mickb for this insight into your practice. So your typical weekday encompasses 4 practice session of 15-20 minutes each. What about the content of these sessions ? Do you usually practice the same piece for the day ? What does the content of your practices look like ? Same piece done the day ? For a week ? What is the size of your repertoire ? How do you keep alive your reperotoire with your approach ?

You made an interesting observation that you practiced piano, the way you studied. Upon reflection, I feel the same. I feel that I am approaching piano the way I approached my studies but I wish I could achieve musically what I achieved academically. 18 months later, and I still lack the confidence with my playing and still figuring out the basics. I have learnt over 60 pieces but I mastered none.

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#2067200 - 04/19/13 03:55 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
Whizbang Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/27/12
Posts: 735
Originally Posted By: JosephAC
I have learnt over 60 pieces but I mastered none.


Tricky word that.

Unfortunately, confetti and balloons generally don't drop from the ceiling when you nail a piece. Even worse, it often happens that as your skills improve, so do your standards. The goalposts recede into the metaphorical distance, even as your skills are making consistent improvement.

Mastered.

There might have been one or two performances that I've done over decades that I feel might have demonstrated some mastery. Some pieces that I've had long, long acquaintance with. Maybe.

I've certainly improved, but damn if mastered isn't a strong word.
_________________________
Whizbang
amateur ragtime pianist

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#2067212 - 04/19/13 04:21 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: Whizbang]
JosephAC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/23/12
Posts: 168
Loc: Melbourne Australia
Originally Posted By: Whizbang
Even worse, it often happens that as your skills improve, so do your standards. The goalposts recede into the metaphorical distance, even as your skills are ...


Aha .... This never crossed my mind. I always feel that I am struggling. Upon reflection, you are right.

In my case, my vision is clearly articulated: I want to be able to play musically any piece of music of my choice. I might have started the journey but the finish line seems to be located in some fairyland....out of my sight and out of reach of my reality.


Edited by JosephAC (04/19/13 04:22 PM)

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#2067220 - 04/19/13 04:32 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
earlofmar Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/21/13
Posts: 1392
Loc: Australia
Originally Posted By: JosephAC
[quote=Whizbang] I might have started the journey but the finish line seems to be located in some fairyland....out of my sight and out of reach of my reality.


No finish line, no shortcuts.........this is the instrument of the devil.
_________________________
I thought I understood endurance sport; then I took up piano
XXXIV-5-XXX

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#2067336 - 04/19/13 09:19 PM Re: What is repeated is hardwired [Re: JosephAC]
EdwardianPiano Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/29/11
Posts: 752
Loc: Liverpool, England
Well I don't know! I was learning the first bar of a Bach minuet the other week and was playing it super slow and then suddenly I played it full tempo! It was like bam- slow to full tempo in a minute. I thought hmmmm.. so watched some you tube videos and my fast tempo was correct.
_________________________
"Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend."

"He who divines the secret of my music is delivered from the misery that haunts the world."


Ludwig Van Beethoven

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