Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#2075799 - 05/02/13 10:59 AM If you had 10 hours per day for piano...
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78
I would really appreciate hearing people's answer to this hypothetical question:

If a beginner / beginner-intermediate player wanted to completely dedicate their life to piano and become the best pianist they could possibly become, what would you advise they do every day for their first year?

While answering, please presume the following:

They have 10 hours per day to spend on piano and anything piano related.
They will NOT give up. From getting tired of piano or any other reason.
They are extremely passionate and they have a lot of life experience to draw from.

I think the question could be answered in two parts:
1) Any advice and or steps to take to develop their skill as much as possible.
2) The routine (with however many hours would yield best results. The person is completely willing and happy to spend 10 hours if it would be of benefit).

I appreciate any advice you guys have as I begin my journey smile

Kindest regards, Matt


Edited by mattmorgan44 (05/02/13 11:01 AM)
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
Ad 800 (Pearl River)
Pearl River World's Best Selling Piano
#2075800 - 05/02/13 11:00 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78

Example answer for (2).. The following to be done every day:

1 1/4 hours prac work on a classical piece learning off sheet music.
2 hours working through a theory book.
3/4 hour listening to diverse music.
1 hour playing scales and finger exercises.
1 hour practising any piece(s) of their choice (can be from sheet or by ear).

I used 6 hours of focused work but if more or less time would be beneficial please work on your own opinion.

Thanks smile
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
#2075838 - 05/02/13 11:44 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
hujidong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/30/13
Posts: 64
Loc: Hawaii
Ok so you're beginner-intermediate, awesome!!
Alright so in your off-time you could be relaxing and listening to classical music, also maybe check out some books that I have really liked: Music: An Art and a Language by Walter Raymond Spalding, Piano Mastery by Harriette Brower, Great Pianists on Piano Playing by James Francis Coooke, and Lessons in Music Form by Percy Goestschius. These are really nice books which have helped me a lot in trying to figure out what music from the piano is. It is nice to start with songs, as they grab the attention with language, and attempt to figure out the polyphony of the weaving and contributing voices to the melody. From there Bach is absolutely wonderful. Every voice is one to itself, without the rankings of 'melodies' or 'upper middle voices' etc. When you feel like the comprehension of that polyphony is becoming apparent, then you can go to reapply the rankings of voices in later music, and figure out how you really want everything to move. From there move to larger piano pieces and then symphonies and piano concertos! I've heard opera is the last step, but I still cannot manage to stay awake throughout a whole opera...oops cool Honestly, I'm probably still stuck somewhere in the whole song thing as far as music comprehension goes.

In your go-time, you should figure out a practice method that really suits you and the strenuous hours of sitting you are going to put yourself through. Although I really hate to say it, practice might soon become more technical than you would like, but it is really for the delivery of the music. You can pick as many pieces as you like based on what is coming up in the future and create sets of pieces that you try to get through in a day. If you keep a journal this way, and with your ample amount of time, you could mark down where you left off in a piece and then resume when you get back to work. With your time and a two different sets of 5 pieces, you could put two hours of work into each piece in a set a day. I usually get through from about 1 line to a page an hour.

So here's to practicing. I feel like us learners should be trying to acquire dexterity and grace upon the keyboard more than getting brute strength of the hands of fingers. With finding out about focal dystonia, that could even be dangerous. You want to develop independence in your fingers and efficiency of motion and energy in your movements. Your body should be relaxed, a conduit of what you think which goes into the piano which then projects your voice. A slow focused practice method will get you there, and build strength upon knowledge of the workings of the piano action acquired through practice.
So it is easiest to notice awkwardness in any passage working hands separately and going through slowly. It feels like my focus isn't barraged by a million things happening at once. I try to find a spot where my hand feels awkward and it seems like the movement can improve. I think I notice an inefficient usage of energy and motion when a hand flies from one key to the next, hovering there above for a split second before touching down, or if the movement itself isn't confident enough for it to be almost like a second nature.

I like to practice to try and get rid of that. So we find an awkward spot in a passage. It could be the only sloppy interval that is throwing off a whole beautiful passage. I try to realize the shape that my hand will have to acquire to deliver the sound and strike upon the notes. Then I try to remember that and push down on the key, and I want to be able to control the whole motion going down, as every bit of it sends the hammer moving towards the string. After that, I try to think about how to keep the key pushed down while using as little strength as possible, to preserve as much energy as I can. Then I want to completely control the release, and know how I am letting the hammer come off the key and what kind of sound it is creating. From there it continues, and on and on and loop de loop. It is extremely frustrating for me, but I am starting to really enjoy the benefits of this practice. I had feared losing speed and strength with this method, but in reality by learning how to use the piano to the best of my abilities, with the relativity of musical excitement required to keep an audience interested, I can start producing the sound that I want from the piano, that which I hear in my head. And through confidence of movement on the keyboard I am finding it less necessary to worry about technical motions or movements on the keyboard when all I really want to do is just hear the music, and try to share it through a piano.
If you post up some troublesome passages or anything I could say some more about how to apply this method onto those passages.

I hope you will find this useful in some way!

All the best


Edited by hujidong (05/02/13 11:46 AM)

Top
#2075842 - 05/02/13 11:48 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
DanS Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/28/12
Posts: 557
Do NOT spend 10 hours a day just pounding away at the piano. You'll kill your hands for sure. Learn how to learn quickly! Spend time on technique, and practice lightly for 9 of those 10 hours.
_________________________
"Most pianists are poor musicians, they dissect music into bits-and-pieces, like a roast chicken" -Debussy

Top
#2075851 - 05/02/13 11:55 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
hujidong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/30/13
Posts: 64
Loc: Hawaii
What was posted above is all light practice. Run your hands under warm water when you take breaks to up circulation to deliver what your hands need from your body! Try and stay away from caffeine and nicotine, they will hurt your circulation and you really need that. Water, breaks, and stretching!

Top
#2075855 - 05/02/13 11:58 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
Morodiene Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11911
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Just a quick comment about opera: it is meant to be watched, not just listened to, so if you're having trouble listening to the whole thing, try watching (especially with subtitles) and that will help tremendously. You can listen to arias alone and get a lot out of that.

Back OT:

I think 10 hours in a day may be too much. It really depends on the individual, and I'd much rather talk about qualitative things a student should do to practice rather than quantitative (i.e., 1 hour on technical exercises, 1 hour on sight reading, etc.). I find the latter to be very useless because for each person the time they can spend on one particular task before being "saturated" and needing to wait until the next day varies so much between individuals.

I think the most valuable things a person can do in this situation is:

1) Listen, listen, listen, especially to live performances whenever possible, and not just piano music, but anything that moves you

2) Learn how to practice well and efficiently. Time is no factor, it's about accomplishing distinct tasks.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
#2075862 - 05/02/13 12:02 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
BruceD Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 18022
Loc: Victoria, BC
Originally Posted By: mattmorgan44
[...]They have 10 hours per day to spend on piano and anything piano related.
[...]


To me, there are major flaws in the premise.

1) No beginner or even a "beginner-intermediate" (what does that mean? either one is a beginner or one is not) should be spending ten hours a day on piano-related study. There just is not enough material within a beginner's grasp that spending that amount of time - every day - on piano-related study would produce results, other than quick burn-out.

2) No beginner knows at the outset that s/he wants to completely dedicate his or her life to piano "and become the best pianist they could possibly become." It takes time, study and some experience to develop that sort of commitment.

Even allowing for several hours a day of listening to music away from the piano, if the beginner has no knowledge of what he is listening to and listening for, that time will be largely wasted in a wash of uncomprehended sound. Even adding the study of theory, the time span is too broad for the beginner to effectively concentrate.

Even many advanced conservatory students don't spend ten hours a day on such single-focus activity.

Regards,
_________________________
BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190

Top
#2075968 - 05/02/13 03:01 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
hujidong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/30/13
Posts: 64
Loc: Hawaii
Love the encouragement.

It's not all about theory. The basics to music appreciation and understanding of the fundamentals becomes the foundation for what is laid next. The books I suggested books focused much more on general ideas like themes phrases and being able to develop an individual analogy of music and literature. Both are works of art..hey what isn't? We must train our minds and bodies! Secret monks living within modern society, contributing to the welfare of all!!..in art..

Anyways, Bruce, I'm gonna guess you don't believe in love at first sight. Your Chopin must be so wonderful..guffaw..kidding!! How about love at second sight? Third? Fourth if you like to play hard to get? :p

OP: When there's a will....; p


Edited by hujidong (05/02/13 03:03 PM)

Top
#2075990 - 05/02/13 03:29 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: hujidong]
BruceD Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 18022
Loc: Victoria, BC
Originally Posted By: hujidong
[...]
Anyways, Bruce, I'm gonna guess you don't believe in love at first sight. Your Chopin must be so wonderful..guffaw..kidding!! How about love at second sight? Third? Fourth if you like to play hard to get? :p
[...]


What does your snide remark about "[my] Chopin" have to do with what I posted or with the premise in the original post?
_________________________
BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190

Top
#2076034 - 05/02/13 04:47 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
hujidong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/30/13
Posts: 64
Loc: Hawaii
The relation of the end of my post to yours was that it was just a joke at the second point in your post, something along the lines of 'what kind of romantic are you!?' I am very sorry about my comment. It was not meant to offend. It's easier to misinterpret read words than words with inflections and accents!
Apologies again friend. frown


Edited by hujidong (05/02/13 04:49 PM)

Top
#2076157 - 05/02/13 08:45 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
mermilylumpkin Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/08/13
Posts: 121
Originally Posted By: mattmorgan44
I would really appreciate hearing people's answer to this hypothetical question:

If a beginner / beginner-intermediate player wanted to completely dedicate their life to piano and become the best pianist they could possibly become, what would you advise they do every day for their first year?

While answering, please presume the following:

They have 10 hours per day to spend on piano and anything piano related.
They will NOT give up. From getting tired of piano or any other reason.
They are extremely passionate and they have a lot of life experience to draw from.

I think the question could be answered in two parts:
1) Any advice and or steps to take to develop their skill as much as possible.
2) The routine (with however many hours would yield best results. The person is completely willing and happy to spend 10 hours if it would be of benefit).

I appreciate any advice you guys have as I begin my journey smile

Kindest regards, Matt


smile Are you just beginning? Are you wanting to spend ten hours a day at the piano? If so, I think that's lovely that you're so devoted. Passion and curiosity and interest can be a sort of fuel to drive you toward your goals and it sounds like you really must love piano if you are entertaining the idea of spending so much time (unless you are asking "for a friend" as it were.)

I'd caution at the outset that practicing 10 hours per day for ~9 days(?) and then getting burnt out is a more realistic scenario than practicing devotedly half an hour every day, for your first few months or years, then ramping it up to an hour, then ramping it up to two hours, and so forth. I think you're more likely to see real, tangible gains through the latter method than the former, though I imagine it's difficult to be told to put a lid on your excitement.

If you must I'd break it down like this:
  • 30 minutes: Methodical, slow, intentional practice of repertoire that you like, maybe ten minutes or so spent on scales or whatever technique activities your teacher is recommending
  • 9 hours and 30 minutes: Listen to piano music you like, read books about piano music, noodle around a bit at the keyboard if you feel compelled.

That's the way I structure my practice time, anyway. I have 2-3 hours of "work, work" time (to quote the orcs from the computergame Warcraft II, ahem) that is pretty belabored and high intensity. Then the rest of my music time is just sort of like the frosting on top and very optional but enjoyable - like I'll listen to lots of recordings in a sort of ravenous way, or I feel like wandering over to the piano outside of my "serious business" time, I might play some things from memory or just play joyfully and tinkle around. YMMV.

If you really do have 10 hours a day, and really are able in terms of logistics and mental stamina to devote that to piano, then the conversation would look different after you'd had 5(?ish) years under your belt. Try to be a bit of a realist as dull as that is, so you don't end up setting impossible expectations for yourself.

Top
#2076212 - 05/02/13 09:54 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mermilylumpkin]
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78
Hujidong, Morodiene, Mermilymumpkin and everyone else that responded, thank you so much. Some of the information you guys have provided is exactly what I was hoping for.

I could only quickly read through them right now. Unfortunately I was just with my Grandpa who died a couple of hours ago. But I will read and respond to each one properly when I have some time.

As well a thanking you, I just wanted to point out that I never said I would be spending 10 hours per day pounding away at the piano. I said I have 10 hours for any piano related activity and was after advice on how to use that time (at and off the piano), knowing that I want to dedicate my entire life to learning piano and piano music.

Also, I made it hypothetical and added the presumptions to follow to try and avoid people jumping to conclusions or writing off the idea that a beginner would or could do this. I made it hypothetical because people don't know the situation I am in, so I thought I'd have more chance of getting advice that way. I hope to become a part of this great community and may get to share some of my story in time. But for now, please take those presumptions as whole truths. I will be spending my entire life learning the piano. Also, if you really don't believe a beginner can spend 10 hours in piano related activities, that is fine. I would still love to hear your opinion on things to do in a lesser time.

Kindest regards, Matt

Originally Posted By: DanS
Do NOT spend 10 hours a day just pounding away at the piano. You'll kill your hands for sure. Learn how to learn quickly! Spend time on technique, and practice lightly for 9 of those 10 hours.


Originally Posted By: BruceD
Originally Posted By: mattmorgan44
[...]They have 10 hours per day to spend on piano and anything piano related.
[...]


To me, there are major flaws in the premise.

1) No beginner or even a "beginner-intermediate" (what does that mean? either one is a beginner or one is not) should be spending ten hours a day on piano-related study. There just is not enough material within a beginner's grasp that spending that amount of time - every day - on piano-related study would produce results, other than quick burn-out.

2) No beginner knows at the outset that s/he wants to completely dedicate his or her life to piano "and become the best pianist they could possibly become." It takes time, study and some experience to develop that sort of commitment.

Even allowing for several hours a day of listening to music away from the piano, if the beginner has no knowledge of what he is listening to and listening for, that time will be largely wasted in a wash of uncomprehended sound. Even adding the study of theory, the time span is too broad for the beginner to effectively concentrate.

Even many advanced conservatory students don't spend ten hours a day on such single-focus activity.

Regards,


Ps. I didn't think using "beginner-intermediate" would be confusing. If a pianist can be placed on a scale from absolute beginner (never played piano) to advanced (very competent) I would place myself somewhere between beginner and intermediate. Much like people do with any other activity. I can explain where I'm at further when I have the time to respond properly.

Thanks again
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
#2076252 - 05/02/13 10:43 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
hujidong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/30/13
Posts: 64
Loc: Hawaii
Then maybe make it a 24/6 kind of schedule. :P

Top
#2076264 - 05/02/13 10:53 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: hujidong]
RachelEDNC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/11/09
Posts: 79
This doesn't answer your original post, but is just a thought...

If you are going to be practicing quite a bit, and are not at an advanced level where you understand how technique works, then you should definitely find the time (and money) to be having at least a one hour lesson twice a week. Given the beginner/intermediate status, you are probably more likely to be practicing mistakes or incorrect technique. You don't want to be wasting your time or going backwards by practicing things incorrectly.

Top
#2076279 - 05/02/13 11:13 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
Kreisler Offline



Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13789
Loc: Iowa City, IA
5-7 hours of practice (and not all repertoire, do some exercises and try your hand at transcription/composition)

Spend the rest of the time listening to music and reading fiction, poetry, or talking walks in nature.

(Which is basically what Brahms and Liszt did...)
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

www.pianoped.com
www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed

Top
#2076338 - 05/02/13 11:57 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: Kreisler]
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78
Originally Posted By: hujidong
Then maybe make it a 24/6 kind of schedule. :P


Haha


Originally Posted By: RachelEDNC
This doesn't answer your original post, but is just a thought...

If you are going to be practicing quite a bit, and are not at an advanced level where you understand how technique works, then you should definitely find the time (and money) to be having at least a one hour lesson twice a week. Given the beginner/intermediate status, you are probably more likely to be practicing mistakes or incorrect technique. You don't want to be wasting your time or going backwards by practicing things incorrectly.


That definitely answers my post, thank you smile and I'm happy to say I have a piano teacher with whom lessons will continue later this month (a placement is opening as a student is finishing). I started a whole thread on exactly what you just said "practicing mistakes or incorrect technique" and about a choosing the right teacher and whether or not I should stay with the teacher I have. This thread sprung off of that one.

I am booked in for 1 hour per week but I was already planning to make it two smile

Originally Posted By: Kreisler
5-7 hours of practice (and not all repertoire, do some exercises and try your hand at transcription/composition)

Spend the rest of the time listening to music and reading fiction, poetry, or talking walks in nature.

(Which is basically what Brahms and Liszt did...)


Thank you for this advice

Also, I want to know the truth, but its nice to hear you say I can practice for that long. Others said 1 1/2 hours per day max or I'm wasting my time :s I do hope you are right
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
#2076342 - 05/03/13 12:01 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
Kreisler Offline



Registered: 11/27/02
Posts: 13789
Loc: Iowa City, IA
I think you'll find that as a beginner/intermediate, you'll need to vary the type of practice a great deal and take a lot of breaks until you build up stamina (both physical and psychological.)

I'd spend 1-2 hours on exercises and repertoire. An hour or so on reading (finding a duet partner would be awesome.) And another hour or so on improvising, composing, transcribing, or just doodling - exploring different sounds and techniques.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

www.pianoped.com
www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed

Top
#2076536 - 05/03/13 09:52 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
Pogorelich. Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/08
Posts: 4528
Loc: in the past
Is this because you want to be a professional?

Why would you want life of a pianist??
_________________________

'I want to invest my emotions only in music; it will never disappoint me or hurt me - it is a safe place to be.'

Top
#2076570 - 05/03/13 10:40 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
mermilylumpkin Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/08/13
Posts: 121
You definitely have to come back and check in in a year or so :-) I will be really interested to hear about your progress. It's an interesting experiment in what will happen if you have the optimal learning conditions and level of drive.

Top
#2076621 - 05/03/13 12:08 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
debrucey Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/18/06
Posts: 2606
Loc: Manchester, UK

Top
#2076713 - 05/03/13 02:58 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
Vid Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/12/01
Posts: 839
Loc: Vancouver, B.C.
FWIW: "Chopin encouraged short practice sessions. Madame Dubois (Camille O'Meara) reported: "One day he heard me say that I practiced six hours a day. He became quite angry, and forbade me to practice more than three hours." (Eigeldinger 27). Another student wrote: "He always advised the pupil not to work for too long at a stretch and to intermit between hours of work by reading a good book, by looking at masterpieces of art, or by taking an invigorating walk."

from here
_________________________
Kawai VPC1, Pianoteq, Galaxy Vintage D

Top
#2076745 - 05/03/13 04:18 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: Kreisler]
cefinow Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/27/10
Posts: 361
Loc: Western NC (US)
Originally Posted By: Kreisler
And another hour or so on improvising, composing, transcribing, or just doodling - exploring different sounds and techniques.


+1

An often overlooked aspect of becoming a musician. I'm dismayed to hear of pianists who are reduced to musical muteness when there is no score to read and no memorized piece ready to go.

Top
#2076782 - 05/03/13 05:40 PM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: cefinow]
Pogorelich. Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/08
Posts: 4528
Loc: in the past
Originally Posted By: cefinow


+1

An often overlooked aspect of becoming a musician. I'm dismayed to hear of pianists who are reduced to musical muteness when there is no score to read and no memorized piece ready to go.


Well that can happen when you're booked with recitals and have massive rep to learn all the time....... Some people don't have time for this.
_________________________

'I want to invest my emotions only in music; it will never disappoint me or hurt me - it is a safe place to be.'

Top
#2076937 - 05/04/13 12:29 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: hujidong]
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78
Originally Posted By: hujidong
Ok so you're beginner-intermediate, awesome!!
Alright so in your off-time you could be relaxing and listening to classical music, also maybe check out some books that I have really liked: Music: An Art and a Language by Walter Raymond Spalding, Piano Mastery by Harriette Brower, Great Pianists on Piano Playing by James Francis Coooke, and Lessons in Music Form by Percy Goestschius. These are really nice books which have helped me a lot in trying to figure out what music from the piano is. ......

......So it is easiest to notice awkwardness in any passage working hands separately and going through slowly. It feels like my focus isn't barraged by a million things happening at once. I try to find a spot where my hand feels awkward and it seems like the movement can improve. I think I notice an inefficient usage of energy and motion when a hand flies from one key to the next, hovering there above for a split second before touching down, or if the movement itself isn't confident enough for it to be almost like a second nature....

....Then I try to remember that and push down on the key, and I want to be able to control the whole motion going down, as every bit of it sends the hammer moving towards the string. After that, I try to think about how to keep the key pushed down while using as little strength as possible, to preserve as much energy as I can. Then I want to completely control the release, and know how I am letting the hammer come off the key and what kind of sound it is creating...

...If you post up some troublesome passages or anything I could say some more about how to apply this method onto those passages.

I hope you will find this useful in some way!

All the best


Hujidong, Thank you for so much advice and such a detailed post.

I will definitely check out those books. I'm sure that would be time well spent.

I have also noticed that when I play a passage slowly any awkward sections become even more apparent to me. I noticed this when recording a very short piece that I am going to post here soon. The slower I played, the more difficult it was to play smoothly. I sure that will improve with practise, but I think your right about slowing a piece down to notice any awkward sections.

I love the way you think about everything that is going on as you strike a key to produce the sound you are after. And how to strike it to preserve energy and keep momentum.

Thanks for all the advice I appreciate it.

Originally Posted By: hujidong
What was posted above is all light practice. Run your hands under warm water when you take breaks to up circulation to deliver what your hands need from your body! Try and stay away from caffeine and nicotine, they will hurt your circulation and you really need that. Water, breaks, and stretching!


Oh yes I already mentioned I won't be hammering away for 10 hours smile

I will definitely try the warm water! And I am happy I don't smoke or drink coffee. Will have to watch the soda though. Thanks


Edited by mattmorgan44 (05/04/13 12:32 AM)
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
#2076939 - 05/04/13 12:35 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: Pogorelich.]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7602
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: cefinow


+1

An often overlooked aspect of becoming a musician. I'm dismayed to hear of pianists who are reduced to musical muteness when there is no score to read and no memorized piece ready to go.


Well that can happen when you're booked with recitals and have massive rep to learn all the time....... Some people don't have time for this.

If you have a massive repertoire, you should never be in the situation cefinow describes. wink
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2076942 - 05/04/13 12:40 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: Morodiene]
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78
Originally Posted By: Morodiene

..... for each person the time they can spend on one particular task before being "saturated" and needing to wait until the next day varies so much between individuals.

I think the most valuable things a person can do in this situation is:

1) Listen, listen, listen, especially to live performances whenever possible, and not just piano music, but anything that moves you

2) Learn how to practice well and efficiently. Time is no factor, it's about accomplishing distinct tasks.


Hi Morodiene, thanks for your reply. I am very happy with both of your suggestions. I have noticed that I seem to improve much more when my practise is focused (distinct tasks). Rather than messing around, which I tend to do a lot while I wait for my lessons - so I don't practise bad technique for hours on end.

I am now going to make a serious effort to get to some live performances. Thank you so much for bringing that to my attention. I have never been to a dedicated piano performance.
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
#2076947 - 05/04/13 12:51 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: BruceD]
mattmorgan44 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/01/13
Posts: 78
Originally Posted By: BruceD

1)... There just is not enough material within a beginner's grasp that spending that amount of time - every day - on piano-related study would produce results, other than quick burn-out.

2) No beginner knows at the outset that s/he wants to completely dedicate his or her life to piano "and become the best pianist they could possibly become." It takes time, study and some experience to develop that sort of commitment.


I appreciate you responding. I addressed the 10 hour issue earlier. Even though I think 10 hours on piano related activity per day would not be a problem at all. But that is your opinion.

On point (2) though, I have to strongly disagree. Although maybe the problem lies in me calling myself a beginner. I do know that I want to dedicate my life to piano. I am in a very unique position to be able to make that sort of commitment.

Thanks
_________________________
Roland RD700NX | Roland HP-507

Top
#2076948 - 05/04/13 12:53 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
mermilylumpkin Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/08/13
Posts: 121
Originally Posted By: mattmorgan44

I have also noticed that when I play a passage slowly any awkward sections become even more apparent to me. I noticed this when recording a very short piece that I am going to post here soon.


One more piece of advice Mattmorgan! Be careful with that (posting your videos on internet forums). I can tell you're a hard worker and care about what you are doing. I think the internet can be a bit like the Discovery Channel, with lions running all around looking for a gazelle whose head to chew on. Anyway, maybe you have a super thick skin, but just know you'll probably get a bit of rabble and it's not always going to be about you or your performance. So don't get too upset if someone tells you you are doing a DISSERVICE to CHOPIN or anything like that. (Lots of really friendly folks in the mix too, obviously!) So yeah, you may not want to post anything too near and dear to your heart :-)

Top
#2076949 - 05/04/13 12:55 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7602
Loc: New York City
I think most knowledgeable posters, when replying to recordings, aim to provide both encouragement and criticism, in varying quantities according to the quality of the recording. ha
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2076950 - 05/04/13 01:00 AM Re: If you had 10 hours per day for piano... [Re: mattmorgan44]
mermilylumpkin Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/08/13
Posts: 121
Hehe, you're right I think. Maybe also in varying quantities according to the person who is offering the feedback! Anyway, it's great; there's obviously lots of talented people bumbling around here and willing to share their advices. Just a tip regarding inner fortitude :-)

Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >

Moderator:  Brendan, Kreisler 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Seiler Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Chrono Trigger piano medley
by Stefo
09/18/14 04:44 PM
need help with deciding between digital and acoustic
by luvboise713
09/18/14 04:16 PM
Sight reading problems
by pianosNpreschooler
09/18/14 03:23 PM
Hello! I have a question about playing for cocktail parties.
by albumblatter
09/18/14 03:10 PM
Piano Concerto in F, Op. 2 Arensky, Anton
by antony
09/18/14 02:33 PM
Who's Online
124 registered (36251, aesop, anotherscott, accordeur, albumblatter, 3times2, 37 invisible), 1231 Guests and 15 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76237 Members
42 Forums
157608 Topics
2315074 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission