Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#2101012 - 06/11/13 04:05 PM Yamaha piano lifespan
Gesualdo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/10/13
Posts: 44
Loc: Minnesota, USA
Hello all,

I keep reading that Yamaha pianos only have about a 30 year life span. What does that mean exactly? Does it mean they are completely trashed after that, or does it mean they'll need some major work and part replacement? I know a well maintained Steinway can last for many generations. What is so different about the manufacture of Yamaha pianos that makes them age so differently?

Last question: do you agree with the idea that they only have a 30 year lifespan?

Thanks,

Mike
_________________________
Technique is a means to an end, but if you don't have any, it's the end!

Top
(ads 568) Hailun Pianos

 

#2101028 - 06/11/13 04:40 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Mark VC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/26/12
Posts: 110
Many of us have played Yamaha's in college practice rooms and other places. Those are old pianos and they have been rode hard and put up wet, for a long time. I think any piano is going to be end-of-life after 30 years of that, unless it gets really consistent expert maintenance.

Top
#2101058 - 06/11/13 05:21 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Rickster Offline


Registered: 03/25/06
Posts: 8534
Loc: Georgia, USA
Don't know if this helps or not, but I honestly thought my 1978 model Yamaha C7 had been rebuilt at some point in its life when I bought it from a church about 3 years ago. The officials at the church did not know a lot about the history of it, other than it was acquired pre-owned back in the early 1990's. I figured they had bought it freshly rebuild.

What made me think this? The paint on the plate looked vibrant and bold, like it was not that old. The red string felt under the strings looked bright and newish. The strings were not rusty and were shiny. The varnish on the sound board looked good and fresh. The hammers had some wear, but not that bad. However, the piano did have a few broken bass strings from use and neglect.

My amateurish opinion was that it had indeed been rebuilt in the past.

I was totally shocked when a well known concert piano tech looked at it recently and said it was all original and had not been rebuilt.

So, do Yamaha’s last more than 30 years? Well it depends on a lot of variables, but I would say so...

Good luck,

Rick
_________________________
Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel

Top
#2101152 - 06/11/13 08:13 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
musicpassion Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 973
Loc: California, USA
Any piano's lifespan is very related to the workload and maintenance it receives.

I certainly don't agree with a blanket statement that a Yamaha can only last 30 years. I've played a Yamaha piano older than 30 years that was fine. So the statement is proved false quite easily.

But is there any underlying truth? In my experience Yamaha does not endure heavy use for prolonged periods as well as a higher end piano, such as a Mason and Hamlin or Steinway.

By the way, the whole "Steinway is a piano for future generations" sounds like marketing hype. Don't get caught up in Steinway marketing hype. They make a quality piano, but I've played 10 year old Steinways in music departments that were very beat up.
_________________________
Pianist and Piano Teacher

Top
#2101158 - 06/11/13 08:24 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Minnesota Marty Offline

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7431
Loc: Rochester MN
It would be interesting to know the wear and tear on the four S&S-D's used at the Cliburn Competition. Some of the contestants seem to think it was the Clobber Competition.
_________________________
Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

Top
#2101168 - 06/11/13 08:32 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Minnesota Marty]
musicpassion Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 973
Loc: California, USA
Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
It would be interesting to know the wear and tear on the four S&S-D's used at the Cliburn Competition. Some of the contestants seem to think it was the Clobber Competition.

Great one - thanks! I wonder if the pianos did suffer... shouldn't there be some kind of Piano Humane Society or something...
_________________________
Pianist and Piano Teacher

Top
#2101171 - 06/11/13 08:35 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: musicpassion]
Minnesota Marty Offline

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7431
Loc: Rochester MN
Originally Posted By: musicpassion
Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
It would be interesting to know the wear and tear on the four S&S-D's used at the Cliburn Competition. Some of the contestants seem to think it was the Clobber Competition.

Great one - thanks! I wonder if the pianos did suffer... shouldn't there be some kind of Piano Humane Society or something...

There was a large fleet of piano technicians, but there certainly was no time for anything major.

Yes, a Yamaha can live well past 30 years. It all depends on its usage, care, and environment.
_________________________
Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

Top
#2101215 - 06/11/13 09:46 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
terminaldegree Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/03/06
Posts: 2676
Loc: western Wisconsin
I think any new piano today, if not abused, kept in a good environment, and regularly maintained will last for 30 years without significant problems. These same pianos could also "last for generations" with replacement of parts and eventual rebuilding, but the economics of investing significant repair dollars would preclude that from happening in most cases.

By the same token, I've seen a "built for generations" type piano that needed pinblock replacement, action replacement, and restringing at just 15 years old. It was used regularly as the only piano in a small concert hall for dress rehearsals and performances, and kept in an environment with substandard temperature and humidity control.
_________________________
Pianist, teacher, internet addict.
Piano Review Editor - Acoustic and Digital Piano Buyer
Casio px-200, Bechstein A190 #192939 @ home
Steinway A #585209, B #416809 @ work
Schimmel 130T #339100, on loan

Top
#2101247 - 06/11/13 11:08 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3336
Any piano, including Steinway, will require extensive work at 30 years old. Yamahas can be rebuilt just as well as any other quality piano.
_________________________
B.Mus. Piano Performance 2009
M.Mus. Piano Performance & Literature 2011
PTG Associate Member
Certified Dampp-Chaser installer

Top
#2101262 - 06/12/13 12:09 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: beethoven986]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21523
Loc: Oakland
Originally Posted By: beethoven986
Any piano, including Steinway, will require extensive work at 30 years old. Yamahas can be rebuilt just as well as any other quality piano.


Perhaps not, if the piano has received appropriate service during those 30 years.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#2101263 - 06/12/13 12:21 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Norbert Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/03/01
Posts: 14138
Loc: Surrey, B.C.
Thinking best to answer such question is the dealer for the make as well as technicians/rebuilders in area.

Chances are dealer saying "no" trying to sell you a new piano, rebuilder ????

Brace yourself for very different answers.

Instead of asking "how long piano will last" you may be more interested to concern yourself how you will enjoy it after work is actually done. Plus the cost of things..

Thinking another 30 years cycle being somewhat on the short, not exactly ideal side...

Norbert


Edited by Norbert (06/12/13 12:25 AM)
_________________________
www.heritagepianos.com
Greater Vancouver B.C. piano dealers for : C.Sauter, Estonia, Brodmann, Ritmuller
604-951-8642

Top
#2101277 - 06/12/13 12:49 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Rod Verhnjak Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/06
Posts: 3659
Loc: Vancouver B.C. Canada
It also depends on the model. If we are talking about a Yamaha U1, throwing a bunch of money at it would not be a wise venture. Same goes for a 30 year old Steinway 1098.

If we were to consider a Yamaha C7 C6 C5 that is beginning to show its age you can get another life out of them without breaking the bank.
We do many of these with fantastic results with customers spending far less than replacing them with the equivalent product by the same manufacture.

Resurface, re-pin and re-notch the bridges
Polish the soundboard or refinish the board
Clean/polish the plate and hardware
Agraffe work
Resurface the v'bar
Change the plate bushings
Change the under string cloth/felt
Install new strings and tuning pins


New dampers
New key bushings
New hammers and shanks
Some work to the key frame
Re & Re the pedal system
Regulation of the action
Reweigh the keys for a spectacular touch.
_________________________
Verhnjak Pianos
Specializing in the Restoration, Refinishing & Maintenance
of Fine Heirloom Pianos

Exclusive Dealer For Charles R. Walter Pianos
www.pianoman.ca
Verhnjak Pianos Facebook


Top
#2101286 - 06/12/13 01:21 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: BDB]
phacke Offline

Gold Supporter until November 11 2014


Registered: 10/18/12
Posts: 532
Loc: CO, USA
Originally Posted By: BDB
Originally Posted By: beethoven986
Any piano, including Steinway, will require extensive work at 30 years old. Yamahas can be rebuilt just as well as any other quality piano.


Perhaps not, if the piano has received appropriate service during those 30 years.


Hello, BDB, or anyone who knows -

Can you give key examples of 'appropriate service', if not done, which would lead to extensive (vague term, I know) work at 30 years old? Assume for the sake of argument, that if any notes became unplayable for any reason, they would not be beat on, and that the temperature and relative humidity were ideal.

And, if the 'appropriate service' was not done over the course of the 30 years, would the cost of the alternative 'extensive work' after those 30 years be more or less than the cost of the 'appropriate service' done distributed over the course of the 30 years (assume zero inflation)?

Thank you!



Edited by phacke (06/12/13 01:24 AM)
_________________________
phacke

Steinway YM (1933)
...Working on:
G. F. Hndel: Suite in G minor (HWV 452)
J. S. Bach, Sonata No. 1 in B minor (BWV 1014) duet with violin

Top
#2101299 - 06/12/13 02:25 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: phacke]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3336
Originally Posted By: phacke
Originally Posted By: BDB
Originally Posted By: beethoven986
Any piano, including Steinway, will require extensive work at 30 years old. Yamahas can be rebuilt just as well as any other quality piano.


Perhaps not, if the piano has received appropriate service during those 30 years.


Hello, BDB, or anyone who knows -

Can you give key examples of 'appropriate service', if not done, which would lead to extensive (vague term, I know) work at 30 years old? Assume for the sake of argument, that if any notes became unplayable for any reason, they would not be beat on, and that the temperature and relative humidity were ideal.

And, if the 'appropriate service' was not done over the course of the 30 years, would the cost of the alternative 'extensive work' after those 30 years be more or less than the cost of the 'appropriate service' done distributed over the course of the 30 years (assume zero inflation)?

Thank you!



New hammers are more or less certain if the piano was played regularly. Most action parts could probably be retained, but not without reconditioning (i.e. shank repining and knuckle replacement, etc.). Restringing with bridge, agraffe, and capo bar work would probably be beneficial, or even necessary, depending on the demands placed upon the piano. Depending on various factors, a new pin block, too, but maybe not. Soundboards would almost certainly be retained.
_________________________
B.Mus. Piano Performance 2009
M.Mus. Piano Performance & Literature 2011
PTG Associate Member
Certified Dampp-Chaser installer

Top
#2101311 - 06/12/13 03:00 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21523
Loc: Oakland
Hammers last a lot longer with appropriate voicing. Regulation gets better and better if it is touched up regularly. In general, you can adjust for the things that get older, but things that get worn, well, once you lose material, it does not come back. It needs to be replaced.

How long a piano lasts depends on a lot of things. When I got my piano, it was about 55 years old, having spent all that time mostly sitting in someone's living room. I spent a few days rebuilding the action, mostly by replacing all the felt in it, except the hammers. Then it was about 15 years before I had saved up enough money to have it refinished, at which time I replaced the strings. But in the interim, it played wonderfully and sounded very good. It sounds a bit better since it has been restrung and the hammers have been replaced.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

Top
#2103031 - 06/15/13 07:43 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
BGJ Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 163
Loc: Texas
I have a 1984 C7 that has been in private hands with regular professional maintenance its entire life. While I enjoy playing it has had a pretty pampered life since 1995, I usually only play a few hours a week. Lack of maintenance, poor environment, and wear and tear are the real enemies of long piano life, like everything else mechanical. My Houston RPT with 40+ years experience told my wife "Don't ever sell it, it is magnificent", no guarantees I won't but it is pretty hard to beat. I have heard and believe the Yamaha C series and up are as well built for durability as any pianos made. Some people may not like the tone, but they are workhorses and properly maintained without abuse can definitely last more than 30 years.

Top
#2103042 - 06/15/13 08:38 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Rod Verhnjak]
Steve Cohen Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 10479
Loc: Maryland/DC/No. VA
Originally Posted By: Rod Verhnjak
It also depends on the model. If we are talking about a Yamaha U1, throwing a bunch of money at it would not be a wise venture. Same goes for a 30 year old Steinway 1098.

If we were to consider a Yamaha C7 C6 C5 that is beginning to show its age you can get another life out of them without breaking the bank.
We do many of these with fantastic results with customers spending far less than replacing them with the equivalent product by the same manufacture.

Resurface, re-pin and re-notch the bridges
Polish the soundboard or refinish the board
Clean/polish the plate and hardware
Agraffe work
Resurface the v'bar
Change the plate bushings
Change the under string cloth/felt
Install new strings and tuning pins


New dampers
New key bushings
New hammers and shanks
Some work to the key frame
Re & Re the pedal system
Regulation of the action
Reweigh the keys for a spectacular touch.


We have had the same work many times with the same results. (Although we rarely reweight the keys.)
_________________________
Piano Industry Consultant- http://www.linkedin.com/pub/steve-cohen/6/b92/b80

Consultant & Contributing Editor - Acoustic & Digital Piano Buyer

Jasons Music
Maryland/DC/No. VA
Since 1937.

www.jasonsmusic.com
My postings, unless stated otherwise, are my personal opinions, not those of my clients.

Top
#2103219 - 06/16/13 08:52 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: phacke]
ShiroKuro Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/04
Posts: 3483
Loc: not in Japan anymore
Originally Posted By: phacke


And, if the 'appropriate service' was not done over the course of the 30 years, would the cost of the alternative 'extensive work' after those 30 years be more or less than the cost of the 'appropriate service' done distributed over the course of the 30 years (assume zero inflation)?


I don't think cost can be evaluated this way, unless you want to put a monetary figure on the "cost" of playing an unmaintained piano for 30 years.
_________________________
Started piano June 1999. My recordings at Box.Net:
https://app.box.com/s/j4rgyhn72uvluemg1m6u




Top
#2103258 - 06/16/13 10:46 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
wilf Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 53
Loc: Alberta Canada
Hope you don't mind me weighing in with a related question.

I just tried out a 1964 G2. It has been owned by a piano teacher since new. She had the hammers, bass strings and pin block replaced 10 years ago. There was a couple of keys that stick. Something tells me that after reading these posts, this piano probably needs a lot more work to make it work really well. Am I right? Roughly what does it costs to start replacing bushings etc? Asking price is 6,000.00. There is an '87 G2 down the road for 8,000.00. Opinions?

Thanks

Wilf

Top
#2103270 - 06/16/13 11:09 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Rickster Offline


Registered: 03/25/06
Posts: 8534
Loc: Georgia, USA
Originally Posted By: Wilf
Hope you don't mind me weighing in with a related question.

I just tried out a 1964 G2. It has been owned by a piano teacher since new. She had the hammers, bass strings and pin block replaced 10 years ago. There was a couple of keys that stick. Something tells me that after reading these posts, this piano probably needs a lot more work to make it work really well. Am I right? Roughly what does it costs to start replacing bushings etc? Asking price is 6,000.00. There is an '87 G2 down the road for 8,000.00. Opinions?

Thanks

Wilf

As I’ve learned a little about pianos, learning to play and to tune and service them, I’ve come to the conclusion that newer is usually better. I’ve also come to the conclusion that it is best to stick with the well-known, more reputable brands.

With that said, I’d take a closer look at the newer G2 and try to negotiate the price some. I’d also suggest having a qualified piano tech check out which ever one you decide to buy (before you buy).

Regarding the older G2, if they did indeed replace the pin-block, they should have replaced all the strings and not just the bass. Also, a sticky key is not a major issue, usually. Brand new pianos have problems with sticky keys… of all makes.

The Yamaha make is a solid brand, in my view; though there are other well-known, high quality makes out there that are just as solid (if not more so).

Good luck and keep us informed. smile

Rick
_________________________
Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel

Top
#2103309 - 06/16/13 12:38 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
PianoWorksATL Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/19/09
Posts: 2707
Loc: Atlanta, GA
Pianos do not have an expiration date, just tendencies, anecdotal evidence and common concerns. I always think of Yamaha's G-series instruments as mid-level which makes the economics of rebuilding them questionable. Their C-series are worth(y of) a moderate amount of rebuilding. Why would that G2, an older, averaged sized instrument capture your attention over other choices? Even then, Yamaha was a fairly mass produced instrument, with many competitors.

We have an older Yamaha C7 (1969) that is largely original. The action is astoundingly good despite the age and life it lived (after a thorough round of servicing). It was recently restrung for the first time, and (after cleaning up the stringing job) it tunes beautifully. The satin black cabinet has a lot of amateur touch up. The piano has "character" and it was "loved" but dang it, it still performs.



This piano is doing better than most at its age, and because it is big, it has some value. The fame of the C7 model for its use in halls and in recordings adds to that.

Consider why you are looking at certain brands, what that means for the value of your dollars spent. Is it helping you or is it limiting you?
_________________________
Sam Bennett
PianoWorks - Atlanta Piano Dealer
Bsendorfer, Estonia, Seiler, Grotrian, Weber & Hailun
Pre-Owned: Yamaha, Kawai, Steinway & other fine pianos
Full Restoration Shop
www.PianoWorks.com
www.youtube.com/PianoWorksAtlanta

Top
#2103537 - 06/16/13 09:10 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Roger Ransom Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/19/05
Posts: 1257
Loc: SouthWest Michigan
I have a Yamaha G7 built in 1961. It has been played a couple hours a day at least and it's still an awesome piano.

I had some work done on it a few years ago - pin block, pins, hammers etc and regulation. I can provide the list. The wippens were still fine and needed nothing.

Who ever told you they only last 30 years was dead wrong.
_________________________
Laugh More
Yamaha G7 - Roland FP7

Top
#2103539 - 06/16/13 09:15 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: wilf]
musicpassion Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 973
Loc: California, USA
Originally Posted By: wilf
Hope you don't mind me weighing in with a related question.

I just tried out a 1964 G2. It has been owned by a piano teacher since new. She had the hammers, bass strings and pin block replaced 10 years ago. There was a couple of keys that stick. Something tells me that after reading these posts, this piano probably needs a lot more work to make it work really well. Am I right? Roughly what does it costs to start replacing bushings etc? Asking price is 6,000.00. There is an '87 G2 down the road for 8,000.00. Opinions?

It is likely there are parts in the action with significant wear, if the piano was ready for new strings, pin block, and hammers. It might be perfectly playable, however.
But here's the bigger question: why are you looking at old Yamaha G series pianos with a significant price tag? Not a direction I would go.
A few suggestsions of where I'd go: Yamaha C series, Kawai, Baldwin.
_________________________
Pianist and Piano Teacher

Top
#2103587 - 06/16/13 11:21 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
wilf Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 53
Loc: Alberta Canada
I am trying to stay within a budget of 6-7,000.00. So far I haven't seen any c series in that price range. I am also not informed as to the differences between the series. So, because of budgetary concerns I may have to settle for the lower end product. I am still considering a number of other pianos including a Baldwin (25 years old) a Yamaha (also 25) and a twelve year old Kawai. All are shorter (5' to 5'3") and all in the same price range. It's hard when your budget is limited to decide what to compromise on. There aren't a large number of choices in this part of Canada. I am making a trip to Vancouver to look at several others in ten days. I am hoping the newer Yamaha will still be available.

Thanks for any additional input.

Wilf

Top
#2103596 - 06/16/13 11:50 PM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Rod Verhnjak Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/06
Posts: 3659
Loc: Vancouver B.C. Canada
I doubt you are going to find what you want in your budget here in our area.
If you do it would be a worn out grey market instrument. Those piano don't do well in the Alberta climate. Add the shipping cost and your even in a tougher situation.

Perhaps take a look at the Chinese manufactured instruments Norbert carries.
_________________________
Verhnjak Pianos
Specializing in the Restoration, Refinishing & Maintenance
of Fine Heirloom Pianos

Exclusive Dealer For Charles R. Walter Pianos
www.pianoman.ca
Verhnjak Pianos Facebook


Top
#2103605 - 06/17/13 12:18 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
wilf Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 53
Loc: Alberta Canada
One of the pianos I referred to is in Norberts shop. I have already talked with him regarding shipping, humidity etc. There are over 100 pianos listed on Craigs list in Vancouver.Only four in Alberta. We'll see what turns up. It will be fun shopping either way. If I have to spend a couple thousand more I will find a way.

Thanks,

Top
#2103613 - 06/17/13 12:32 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: Gesualdo]
Allan W. Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/03/12
Posts: 375
Loc: Michigan
Since we're on the topic, is a G7 from the early 60's worth $15k if the action is decent and sound is OK? Strings don't look original but not brand new either.

(not buying it anytime soon, just wondering)

Top
#2103652 - 06/17/13 02:49 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: wilf]
musicpassion Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 973
Loc: California, USA
Originally Posted By: wilf
There aren't a large number of choices in this part of Canada.

Ok - disregard my previous post then. This goes to show how huge geographic factors are for piano purchases. Piano market here is different.
_________________________
Pianist and Piano Teacher

Top
#2103655 - 06/17/13 02:59 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: wilf]
Rod Verhnjak Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/06
Posts: 3659
Loc: Vancouver B.C. Canada
Originally Posted By: wilf
One of the pianos I referred to is in Norberts shop. I have already talked with him regarding shipping, humidity etc. There are over 100 pianos listed on Craigs list in Vancouver.Only four in Alberta. We'll see what turns up. It will be fun shopping either way. If I have to spend a couple thousand more I will find a way.

Thanks,


Wow I never thought there would be so few grand pianos in Calgary/Edmonton on Craigslist. I checked it out. I even saw a ad or two that are also on our local CL. Wounder were those pianos are?

Enjoy your time here smile
_________________________
Verhnjak Pianos
Specializing in the Restoration, Refinishing & Maintenance
of Fine Heirloom Pianos

Exclusive Dealer For Charles R. Walter Pianos
www.pianoman.ca
Verhnjak Pianos Facebook


Top
#2103796 - 06/17/13 11:30 AM Re: Yamaha piano lifespan [Re: PianoWorksATL]
Entheo Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/12/04
Posts: 1114
Loc: chicago, il
Originally Posted By: PianoWorksATL
Pianos do not have an expiration date, just tendencies, anecdotal evidence and common concerns. I always think of Yamaha's G-series instruments as mid-level which makes the economics of rebuilding them questionable. Their C-series are worth(y of) a moderate amount of rebuilding. Why would that G2, an older, averaged sized instrument capture your attention over other choices? Even then, Yamaha was a fairly mass produced instrument, with many competitors.

We have an older Yamaha C7 (1969) that is largely original. The action is astoundingly good despite the age and life it lived (after a thorough round of servicing). It was recently restrung for the first time, and (after cleaning up the stringing job) it tunes beautifully. The satin black cabinet has a lot of amateur touch up. The piano has "character" and it was "loved" but dang it, it still performs.



This piano is doing better than most at its age, and because it is big, it has some value. The fame of the C7 model for its use in halls and in recordings adds to that.

Consider why you are looking at certain brands, what that means for the value of your dollars spent. Is it helping you or is it limiting you?


nice post as usual sam; and nice video... it does still indeed perform.
_________________________
diary of an amateur pianist

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  Ken Knapp, Piano World, Rickster 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Seiler Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Has anyone tried out wireless USB hubs for software pianos?
by Allan W.
Today at 02:34 AM
What books do you use for teaching beginners?
by Daffodil
Today at 12:54 AM
Help buying digital piano for my son
by roomservicetaco
Yesterday at 11:54 PM
Headphone impedance for DP90se
by lunobili
Yesterday at 10:29 PM
A Simulation Investigating the Source of Inharmonicity
by PaintedPostDave
Yesterday at 10:18 PM
Who's Online
60 registered (BB Player, beet31425, Al LaPorte, ando, aesop, 13 invisible), 795 Guests and 16 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76250 Members
42 Forums
157618 Topics
2315161 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission