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#2105249 - 06/20/13 08:43 AM accurate blind jumps
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
I have to perform something Sunday and I'm struggling with making accurate left hand jumps.

Yeah, a quick glance is one way, but I'm also singing it and directing a small group; if I look down I'm losing my place.

I could cheat and simplify, but it sounds much better as octaves in the left hand. C, G, F, C, etc.

How do you all work on blind jumps?
_________________________
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#2105256 - 06/20/13 09:16 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Andy Platt Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2380
Loc: Virginia, USA
Between now and Sunday ... might have to cheat! I'm assuming there are too many places to memorize for you to at least not have to look at the music?

My spatial awareness is near zero. But I have practiced jumps pretty well with a piece I know well. But it takes time. Practice them back and forwards. Obviously practice them blind. But mostly sneak a look!
_________________________
  • Liszt - Liebestršume No. 3, S541
  • Scarlatti - Sonata in D minor, K. 213

Kawai K3

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#2105258 - 06/20/13 09:25 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
TimR, I have read our post, here:

I have to perform something Sunday and I'm struggling with making accurate left hand jumps.

Yeah, a quick glance is one way, but I'm also singing it and directing a small group; if I look down I'm losing my place.

I could cheat and simplify, but it sounds much better as octaves in the left hand. C, G, F, C, etc.

How do you all work on blind jumps?

__________________________________________________

I am a beginner and I have learning problems - dyslexic - but if I was faced with your problem, I would:

....I have to perform something Sunday and I'm struggling with making accurate left hand jumps.

- pray hard from now till Sunday.

...Yeah, a quick glance is one way, but I'm also singing it and directing a small group; if I look down I'm losing my place.

- I would put bits of red, green, yellow, blue, black electrician's tape on the spots of the music that begin the jumps and match the colour codes with the on first key of the jump with the same colour code with bit of tape on the key of the piano that the jump starts.

Electrician's tape is easy to apply to paper and anything and is easily removed and leaves no marks.

-- Also I would photocopy the music in such a way that each jump would start at the top of the page - so you may have a few more pages to turn, but every jump is at the top of the page and coloured coded - so can't get lost in the music and you keep turning the pages as you play -- or look across the pages as they are laid out across the music stand.

good luck.


Edited by Michael_99 (06/20/13 09:46 AM)

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#2105262 - 06/20/13 09:35 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Michael_99]
Kymber Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/25/08
Posts: 1348
Loc: MA
Originally Posted By: Michael_99
TimR, I have read our post, here:

I have to perform something Sunday and I'm struggling with making accurate left hand jumps.

Yeah, a quick glance is one way, but I'm also singing it and directing a small group; if I look down I'm losing my place.

I could cheat and simplify, but it sounds much better as octaves in the left hand. C, G, F, C, etc.

How do you all work on blind jumps?

__________________________________________________

I am a beginner and I have learning problems - dyslexic - but if I was faced with your problem, I would:

....I have to perform something Sunday and I'm struggling with making accurate left hand jumps.

- pray hard from now till Sunday.

...Yeah, a quick glance is one way, but I'm also singing it and directing a small group; if I look down I'm losing my place.

- I would put bits of red, green, yellow, blue, black electrician's tape on the spots of the music that begin the jumps and match the colour codes with the on first key of the jump with the same colour code with bit of tape on the key of the piano that the jump starts.

Electrician's tape is easy to apply to paper and anything and is easily removed and leaves no marks.





I will just practice that one jump over and over and over again. Soon enough you are doing it automatically.

But, the electricians tape is a good idea.
_________________________
“The doubters said, "Man cannot fly," The doers said, "Maybe, but we'll try,"
And finally soared in the morning glow while non-believers watched from below.‚ÄĚ
‚Äē Bruce Lee

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#2105270 - 06/20/13 10:06 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I think between now and Sunday you should be able to work it out.

The best way is to do it by first going very slowly and lifting WAY up over the keys in a big arc. The problem with jumping is that we often get worried about the horizontal distance and tense up for it, which will inevitably make us miss our target. So we forget that it's much easier to use arm weight downward, not sideways.

So first you lift way up in the air. Don't try to land accurately, just let it fall in the general area. Go back and forth between the two octaves, and try to speed up the process but still feel the downward motion on each. Then try to get a little more accurate with them as you go back and forth without tensing. Just observe: OK, I didn't go far enough down this time, so you fix that the next time around. Keep doing this until you can do it with accuracy. Chances are you will be playing this leap far faster than needed within the context of the piece.

I think marking up the music with post-it notes, tape, markers, what have you is also good so it's easier for your eyes to get back on the music if you have to look down.
_________________________
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Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2105288 - 06/20/13 10:51 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Morodiene]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I think between now and Sunday you should be able to work it out.

The best way is to do it by first going very slowly and lifting WAY up over the keys in a big arc. The problem with jumping is that we often get worried about the horizontal distance and tense up for it, which will inevitably make us miss our target. So we forget that it's much easier to use arm weight downward, not sideways.



That's something I have not tried and I'll work on it tonight.

Thanks!
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#2105296 - 06/20/13 11:05 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: TimR
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I think between now and Sunday you should be able to work it out.

The best way is to do it by first going very slowly and lifting WAY up over the keys in a big arc. The problem with jumping is that we often get worried about the horizontal distance and tense up for it, which will inevitably make us miss our target. So we forget that it's much easier to use arm weight downward, not sideways.



That's something I have not tried and I'll work on it tonight.

Thanks!
I got it from William Westney's book, "The Perfect Wrong Note". If you haven't picked up this book, I highly recommend it. There's a lot of great practice tips in there that have really changed how me and my students go about practicing.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2105310 - 06/20/13 11:40 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3160
Loc: Maine
Morodiene, I am going to get that book right away! I have seen it recommended before, but have never quite been convinced. Your describing the octave technique of coming up high and coming down is so different from what I do (with a low arc and brushing the fronts of the black keys to know where I am), that I am convinced I this book will be valuable to teach me lots of right ways to do things where I may be doing them suboptimally.

I wish I could afford a teacher. But not just any teacher who pounds notes, but a teacher who would know these subtle things and teach them to me. I can do OK on my own applying the things I do know (maybe not as good as if someone external were there to prod me and correct me and spot things sooner than I notice them, but good enough to feel reasonably OK about my playing), but it's the things I have absolutely no idea about that I can't supply for myself.

And I fear those things are going to cause a massive roadblock for me sometime... I'm currently reading a website about subtle finger and arm mechanics and how they are the key to effortless scales (and not just scales, but really anything), and I can tell that while I still have room to speed up my scales based on just getting familiar with the patterns, that my technique is missing something that would lead to fluidity at much faster speeds. And I don't necessarily believe that just a description on a website can teach me the subtlety of what I need to know, because it's only a teacher who could observe me in real time and make corrections that I don't even realize need to be made. Grrrrr. But that's the best I can do for now, keep picking up scraps of information and trying out how it feels.
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#2105338 - 06/20/13 12:29 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Derulux Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/05
Posts: 5292
Loc: Philadelphia
I've always somewhat disagreed with the "make a giant arc" approach (sorry Morodiene frown ), not because it doesn't work, but because it doesn't specifically help you learn what caused your problem and how to overcome it. Some people do have a lot of success trying this, so by all means, if it works for you, then use it. (Especially considering you're on a truncated time-table.) I've heard many success stories, which is probably why the method is relatively popular, but they are usually limited stories. IE- "I was able to fix that one passage in that one piece!" Instead of, "I was able to adjust my technique so now I can play octaves/leaps in all pieces."

For this weekend, I would recommend "cheating" and looking. (It's actually not cheating. Everybody does it.)

For the future, give this a shot:

Most octaves are missed because people think the leap is too large, and, ironically, that they are going to miss it. This causes one of two reactions: a tense motion to try to "control" the leap (in which case, you land short of the mark), or an over-excited "throwing" of the hand to "get it down/up there" (in which case, you land past the mark).

I find very often, beginners are also concerned with either the pinky or the thumb in octave leaps. I think this is because they think they might get one of the fingers there, but not the other. But this is counter-productive. Your hand knows the distance of an octave. You need to focus on the shortest distance you can "connect" in your mind.

For example, if you're playing a C-octave in the left hand, and need to jump down to a G-octave, you may be comfortable at the C, but are concerned about hitting the bottom G. So, you think from the thumb of your C-octave (where you know you are) to the pinky of your G-octave (where you think you have to go). Man, that's a long way. Instead, you should move the opposite: from the pinky of the C-octave to the thumb of the G-octave. A much smaller leap, and one you can connect. Try this: Play the C-octave and hold it down. Now, lift the thumb, but leave the pinky. Allow your thumb to drift towards the G, but don't move it along the keys. Open your hand like you're waving hello to the top of the keyboard (your thumb will be high in the air, and yes, your hand will turn sideways). When your thumb is in place to play down into the G, move your pinky down the octave to the lower G. Play the octave, making sure the wrist motion is either straight down, or even rotating slightly towards the thumb. (Do not rotate towards the pinky -- you'll know if you do, because the thumb will play the note first, and the octave will sound broken.)

One way to "cheat" this idea is to place your 2nd finger on the G while playing the C-octave. Then, replace that finger with your thumb. I find this creates a certain amount of tension if you have to play repeated C-octaves, so I don't often recommend it. But it is a method that meets with some success, and with the few days you have to mess around with this, might be a considerable option.

When I play LH octave leaps, I almost always connect the leap as I described above (pinky-to-thumb on the way down; thumb-to-pinky on the way up). There are exceptions, but I like to deal with the "rule" before its exceptions. This said, in my mind, I'm usually focused entirely on the movement of my thumb even though my hand is connecting as I described. In faster octave passage work, it's much easier to concentrate on one finger than a whole hand, and it helps me keep my focus closer to the center of the keyboard than the extremes. But I would only consider adding this element after the motion you're making is corrected.

If you are able to post videos of your attempts, I can help you further. If you've got any questions about what I wrote, please feel free to ask here or PM me. smile
_________________________
Every day we are afforded a new chance. The problem with life is not that you run out of chances. In the end, what you run out of are days.

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#2105350 - 06/20/13 12:55 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: PianoStudent88]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: PianoStudent88
And I don't necessarily believe that just a description on a website can teach me the subtlety of what I need to know, because it's only a teacher who could observe me in real time and make corrections that I don't even realize need to be made. Grrrrr. But that's the best I can do for now, keep picking up scraps of information and trying out how it feels.
This is exactly the problem.

Is is possible you could find a teacher who would be willing to teach you as you are able to afford lessons? Maybe even once a month?
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2105351 - 06/20/13 12:59 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Derulux]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: Derulux
I've always somewhat disagreed with the "make a giant arc" approach (sorry Morodiene frown ), not because it doesn't work, but because it doesn't specifically help you learn what caused your problem and how to overcome it. Some people do have a lot of success trying this, so by all means, if it works for you, then use it. (Especially considering you're on a truncated time-table.) I've heard many success stories, which is probably why the method is relatively popular, but they are usually limited stories. IE- "I was able to fix that one passage in that one piece!" Instead of, "I was able to adjust my technique so now I can play octaves/leaps in all pieces."
I've used this countless times with myself and my students in many different pieces with success. I'm not sure why you think it doesn't work. Nor am I saying it's the only way to solve a problem.



Quote:
Most octaves are missed because people think the leap is too large, and, ironically, that they are going to miss it. This causes one of two reactions: a tense motion to try to "control" the leap (in which case, you land short of the mark), or an over-excited "throwing" of the hand to "get it down/up there" (in which case, you land past the mark).
This is precisely what my above suggestion addresses. Tension and accuracy.

Quote:
For example, if you're playing a C-octave in the left hand, and need to jump down to a G-octave, you may be comfortable at the C, but are concerned about hitting the bottom G. So, you think from the thumb of your C-octave (where you know you are) to the pinky of your G-octave (where you think you have to go). Man, that's a long way. Instead, you should move the opposite: from the pinky of the C-octave to the thumb of the G-octave. A much smaller leap, and one you can connect. Try this: Play the C-octave and hold it down. Now, lift the thumb, but leave the pinky. Allow your thumb to drift towards the G, but don't move it along the keys. Open your hand like you're waving hello to the top of the keyboard (your thumb will be high in the air, and yes, your hand will turn sideways). When your thumb is in place to play down into the G, move your pinky down the octave to the lower G. Play the octave, making sure the wrist motion is either straight down, or even rotating slightly towards the thumb. (Do not rotate towards the pinky -- you'll know if you do, because the thumb will play the note first, and the octave will sound broken.)

One way to "cheat" this idea is to place your 2nd finger on the G while playing the C-octave. Then, replace that finger with your thumb. I find this creates a certain amount of tension if you have to play repeated C-octaves, so I don't often recommend it. But it is a method that meets with some success, and with the few days you have to mess around with this, might be a considerable option.

When I play LH octave leaps, I almost always connect the leap as I described above (pinky-to-thumb on the way down; thumb-to-pinky on the way up). There are exceptions, but I like to deal with the "rule" before its exceptions. This said, in my mind, I'm usually focused entirely on the movement of my thumb even though my hand is connecting as I described. In faster octave passage work, it's much easier to concentrate on one finger than a whole hand, and it helps me keep my focus closer to the center of the keyboard than the extremes. But I would only consider adding this element after the motion you're making is corrected.
This is alos a good approach and can be used in conjunction with other suggestions given here. But why wouldn't it help for this weekend?
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2105354 - 06/20/13 01:02 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Vitali.P Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 06/17/13
Posts: 5
Loc: Germany
Hi TimR,

in addition to many good suggestions already posted,
this youtube video might be interesting for you:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI7uabNseUc

Vitali.

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#2105387 - 06/20/13 03:08 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
Thanks for all the suggestions. I'll be trying everything tonight.

I am thinking pinky to thumb. I am not rotating and I am way tense, steering the motion. And yes, not relaxing does always get me in trouble (when I stop feeling the keys I know a train wreck is coming).

I could change the accompaniment, I wrote it myself, but I kind of like the way octave roots sound against the chord up high. It's simple enough you'd all laugh, but hard enough I have to work on it.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#2105389 - 06/20/13 03:11 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Vitali.P]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: Vitali.P
Hi TimR,

in addition to many good suggestions already posted,
this youtube video might be interesting for you:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI7uabNseUc

Vitali.
I like this guy...also a good idea! thumb
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2105397 - 06/20/13 03:29 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Morodiene]
4evrBeginR Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/27/09
Posts: 1607
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I got it from William Westney's book, "The Perfect Wrong Note". If you haven't picked up this book, I highly recommend it. There's a lot of great practice tips in there that have really changed how me and my students go about practicing.


This book was assigned to me by my piano teacher, too. It's sitting right on my coffe table. Now if I actually get around to reading it. laugh
_________________________
Art is never finished, only abandoned. - da Vinci

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#2105444 - 06/20/13 05:30 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Derulux Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/06/05
Posts: 5292
Loc: Philadelphia
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I've used this countless times with myself and my students in many different pieces with success. I'm not sure why you think it doesn't work. Nor am I saying it's the only way to solve a problem.

Let me start my response by saying that I always respect your posts, particularly of this nature. I know you know what you're talking about, even though we've never met. You've significantly and single-handedly cut down on my post count, because usually after you post, there's very little left to add. smile

I actually never said that it doesn't work. wink I said it doesn't directly address the underlying technical issue with these types of leaps. Subtle difference, I know. Here's what I hope that I mean: the high-hand method is more of an intuitive-corrective approach than a direct-corrective approach, because we don't play octaves at speed in that way. In other words, it doesn't exaggerate a "real" motion of playing octaves so that the motion is visible and can be learned; it creates a "new" motion intended to eliminate a previously incorrect motion.

I think what this does is to promote a routine that helps the person intuit the solution to octave problems, but isn't as specific as it could be in addressing the root cause. For most people, the end result is nearly the same, though the method may be different. (I think -- or at least I hope -- I discussed this in my first post. If I didn't, then shame on me!)

Quote:
This is alos a good approach and can be used in conjunction with other suggestions given here. But why wouldn't it help for this weekend?

Eh. It's one of those things where, when you're this close to a performance and especially still a beginner, sometimes changing things can make the insecurity/hesitation/tension worse. If you're already concerned with the leap, making a significant change could lead to even more mental issues under pressure that cause even more tension in the performance -- which, unfortunately results in an even worse problem during the performance.

I usually try to coach people away from making changes so close to a performance unless they know that, under pressure, they can handle those changes without affecting their mental game.

But, by all means, it is possible to learn either method by Sunday and have a successful performance. Just depends on how quickly you can change/adapt, and what your mental comfort level is under the pressure of performance.


Originally Posted By: TimR
I could change the accompaniment, I wrote it myself, but I kind of like the way octave roots sound against the chord up high. It's simple enough you'd all laugh, but hard enough I have to work on it.

Without seeing the music, you could try rearranging it this way: play the octave C, but only the bottom notes of the F and G. If you have to, move the C an octave lower so the F and G are in the middle. You should get a similar sound without having to make the leaps.

If, somehow, your hands are close enough, you may be able to redistribute, which would allow you to reposition the LH.

Hope it helps. smile
_________________________
Every day we are afforded a new chance. The problem with life is not that you run out of chances. In the end, what you run out of are days.

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#2105607 - 06/21/13 08:04 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
I made some progress last night. I can simplify further if needed and I'll do a plan B. I'm not worried about nerves; I'm an unskilled pianist but not new to performance. If I could just accompany this would be a snap, but with this group if I don't sing they'll flounder.

I like the idea of figuring out why I miss leaps and orienting practice towards that problem.

Things I noticed:

My spatial awareness (keyboard geometry) decays the further I get from the center of the keyboard. I think that's a function of two things: I don't play downthere/upthere much, and I'm visually challenged with particularly poor peripheral vision.

I'm not missing jumps by much. I didn't realize it, but I'm usually hitting the right key, I'm just not precisely in the center, and I'm catching the edge of another key. My ear says WRONG and I cringe but actually almost right would be another way to look at it.

I liked the video. I think the reason it works is you stop and get feedback on your position faster. When I learned to juggle the practice procedure was throw (analogous to the leap), catch, freeze, deliberately relax, sense, move slowly to correct position, repeat. This was the fastest and most efficient way to improve the accuracy of the throw, which is the most essential fundamental.
_________________________
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#2105614 - 06/21/13 08:13 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Andy Platt Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2380
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: TimR
I made some progress last night. I can simplify further if needed and I'll do a plan B. I'm not worried about nerves; I'm an unskilled pianist but not new to performance. If I could just accompany this would be a snap, but with this group if I don't sing they'll flounder.


I often find when I'm singing and playing at the same time, that my hands work much better - perhaps I'm over-thinking when I'm just playing! Although that is generally when I'm improvising not trying to play an actual arranged piece. The latter I still find doing while singing extremely difficult.
_________________________
  • Liszt - Liebestršume No. 3, S541
  • Scarlatti - Sonata in D minor, K. 213

Kawai K3

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#2105663 - 06/21/13 09:48 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
TimR, do you have the vocal part memorized?
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2105717 - 06/21/13 11:57 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Morodiene]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
TimR, do you have the vocal part memorized?


I will by Sunday!

This group will actually be surprised if I sing the correct words. I've needed new glasses most of the past year, and in the dim lighting of the church frequently didn't quite see the words quite right and made up new ones on the fly; it was a constant source of amusement for the altos in front of me. Sometimes I didn't even realize I was doing it. Now I have vision insurance and I'm seeing better.

Immoral, invisible, God only wise,
Too tight inaccessible hid from our eyes. Etc.


Edited by TimR (06/21/13 12:04 PM)
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#2105725 - 06/21/13 12:14 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11676
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: TimR
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
TimR, do you have the vocal part memorized?


I will by Sunday!

This group will actually be surprised if I sing the correct words. I've needed new glasses most of the past year, and in the dim lighting of the church frequently didn't quite see the words quite right and made up new ones on the fly; it was a constant source of amusement for the altos in front of me. Sometimes I didn't even realize I was doing it. Now I have vision insurance and I'm seeing better.

Immoral, invisible, God only wise,
Too tight inaccessible hid from our eyes. Etc.
I find that having the words memorized really helps, then you can focus on your playing. Seeing helps, too. wink
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2106116 - 06/22/13 08:35 AM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
Tubbie0075 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/17/10
Posts: 544
Might be a bit late, but here are my 2 cents:

I read that the left hand notes are C-G-F-C. I presume you are using 5-1-5-1 fingering? so the jump would be between G and F. The important note here is G (not to mean accent it) for the preparation to jump to F. Very common people would focus the landing (target) than the take off.

1st finger resting on G, play G with a feeling of "bouncing" as soon as you hit it (like it has a spring underneath the thumb). Your forearm should be lifting up as a result of the bounce. Then drop back to the note G without any effort and let gravity do the job.

Once you are familiar with the bouncing feeling, play G then bounce to F and rest your 5th finger there without playing. Make this movement as fast as you can between the 2 notes. Practice until you can bounce and land accurately on F (still without playing F). Once you feel that you've got it, play as normal. When you play at normal tempo, make those movements as small and as economical, so small you can hardly see it but you can feel it.

Good luck!

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#2106362 - 06/22/13 05:19 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: Tubbie0075]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Tubbie0075
Might be a bit late, but here are my 2 cents:

I read that the left hand notes are C-G-F-C. I presume you are using 5-1-5-1 fingering? so the jump would be between G and F.


Oh, sorry, I didn't describe in enough detail what I'm doing.

It is common in some styles of church music to play a left hand pattern on simple chords, usually I, IV, and V, where you first play the root in octaves, followed by the chord up an octave. So for example you would play C2 and C3 with 5 and 1 of left hand as a chord with pedal, followed by C3 E3 G3 as a chord on the next beat. Then the chord change may follow. Usually the right hand is tinkling along on the melody. That requires a shift of the left hand, but it's not a difficult shift because you have a finger on C3 so you know where it is without looking.

What I'm doing is based on this. I play C2 C3 together 5 and 1 of left hand on beat one, and while holding I play C5 E5 G5 with the right hand on beats two and three. I don't want to play the melody here, I'm staying out of the way of the voices.

Then I need to change the chord, and here's where the leap comes. I need to move the C2 C3 left hand to play G2 G3. I play the root note of the chord in octaves with the left hand, followed by the entire chord in the right hand a couple of octaves above it.

It's a method of adding variety to a simple accompaniment, and at my skill level I stick to simple if I'm playing in public.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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#2106935 - 06/23/13 08:08 PM Re: accurate blind jumps [Re: TimR]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
Well, it's done.

The performance went well.

And I cheated big time. I recruited extra singers to take that pressure off me. I memorized the piano part, and refrained from singing except where they really needed it. So I was able to look at my hands as needed, and got through it fine.

I still need to keep working on leaps, but this one worked out.
_________________________
gotta go practice

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