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#2107300 - 06/24/13 04:10 PM Should I get a digital piano?
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
As you can see from my post count (assuming you're reading this in 2013), I haven't posted much here, but I've been lurking.

I am deep into middle age (late 50s) and a lifelong musician. I gigged for many years in Nashville as a bass and rhythm guitar player. About 3-4 years ago I decided to try to learn jazz piano. I have an excellent teacher here in the Northern Virginia suburbs of DC, and it's going well.

But the piano in my house, an Everett spinet from the 1950s, is rather frustrating. It's got a rather uneven voice, questionable damping, and even some notes that growl a bit (including the all-crucial middle C). Three different piano technicians have advised my wife and me not to spend any kind of money trying to fix it up. I'd like to replace it.

The thing is, though, this piano belonged to my wife's grandmother, and I'm afraid it's here to stay. Every time I have hinted at getting a decent reconditioned upright, I've gotten a very chilly response. At the very least, it seems to be a permanent piece of legacy furniture in our living room.

So I've been thinking that I should maybe find a decent slab-style DP, just so I can play on a keyboard with a reasonable and even touch. I'm nowhere near needing something to play gigs, and I think I'm past the time in my life where I'm going to be doing a lot of living-room demos requiring a slew of different instrument sounds. Just decent grand piano; maybe also B3 organ and Fender Rhodes-ish voices.

After poring over these forums for a couple of days, I went over to the local Guitar Center this morning and messed around with a Casio PX-150, a Yamaha DX-640 (way more instruments than I need, but very nice touch), and a Yamaha P-105. Reading these threads moves me toward something like a Yamaha P-155.

Can anybody give me some guidance?

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#2107308 - 06/24/13 04:24 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
MacMacMac Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/24/09
Posts: 3788
Loc: North Carolina
Don't expect a digital piano to sound like an acoustic.

Are you sure your piano is beyond repair?

If the strings are all or mostly rusted, it's probably not worthe the cost of string replacement.

If the pinblock is cracked or if there are many loose pins, the repair cost will be far too high to be worthwhile.

But short of that, it might well be worth fixing.

But the uneven tone might just require hammer voicing.
The growling middle C might just be a bad or notched hammer.

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#2107316 - 06/24/13 04:40 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
Thomas Williams Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/18/04
Posts: 62
Loc: NJ, USA
Out of the digitals that you mentioned, probably the Yamaha P series keyboards (at least the higher numbered ones -- the P-155 anyway) probably will have a better piano sound than the DX-640. (It's been a while since I played the latter model, but from what I remember, the DX-640 seems to sacrifice piano sound and probably touch in favor of having many other features, like a large bank of other instrument sounds.) Some of the Casio PX keyboards are comparable to the Yamahas, it just depends on one's preference. If you're open to spending a bit more than the cost of one of these, be sure to check out Roland's digital pianos (the ones with SuperNatural piano technology -- there's a range of models in differing price ranges and with more or fewer features, and also different options in terms of feel/action). Overall they have the best feeling action of any digitals available, to me anyway, and also great piano sound.

Of course, you might want to get a second opinion about the restoration of your acoustic. If you have a decent one (and if that is good for your living situation), having the real thing will be far more awesome than even the best of today's digitals.
_________________________
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-hvAs0rvMk

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#2107325 - 06/24/13 04:58 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
gvfarns Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/16/07
Posts: 3483
Loc: Pennsylvania
I think you are in a great position to get a digital piano. I grew up playing on a nasty old spinet and once I got a quality digital I stopped playing the spinet altogether. Still a nice piece of furniture/memorabilia in some ways, but not much of a musical instrument.

I think you are making a wise decision in looking at slab-style pianos that don't dominate your house (and tend to be cheaper and more easily researched).

In your situation, where you are looking for a digital piano primarily as an upgrade to your existing acoustic, you might want to stay off the bottom end, which the PX150 and P105 represent. The P155 has a higher-end action than the P105, but I don't personally find its tone all that much better. You might consider splurging a little more (assuming you can afford it) and moving up the line. The Yamaha P50 is a possibility or Kawai MP6 or ES7. The piano store in my town has put their Roland FP7F on sale ($1700) since it just got replaced by the FP-80. I played the FP7F, then the P155 and P105 right next to it to compare. In my opinion it outclasses them...for not that much more money when you think about it. The other possibility is the use of software pianos, which is my choice. They have much more detailed, realistic tone although there is a certain amount (not a ton, but some) of hassle associated with hooking your piano up to a computer.

Also, consider what your limiting factor is. Do you primarily have a problem with the tone of your acoustic or the action? You can get a lot of tone out of a software piano paired with a super-cheap digital, but the action won't be all that great. Also, because the actions from Kawai, Casio, Yamaha, and Roland all feel different, you might need to do some careful testing if action quality is what you are looking for.

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#2107332 - 06/24/13 05:04 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
Thanks for the quick replies.

I may not have explained the situation with our acoustic piano. If I got another opinion about its restoration, it would be a FOURTH opinion. Three different piano techs, over a period of more than a decade, have offered the same evaluation: for just a bit more than the money it would cost to replace damper felts and hammers, the instrument--never very high-quality in the first place--could be replaced by a reconditioned Yamaha or Kawai upright.

I know this, because I made the drive over to Rick Jones Pianos myself and played some.

In other words, three uninterested professional techs told us it's not at all worth fixing. I keep it in tune, and recently had the action regulated, but it is what it is.

My problem is that I doubt I'll convince my wife to bring a second upright into the house. That would be my ideal solution, but it's not going to happen.

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#2107340 - 06/24/13 05:10 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
gvfarns, you were replying the same time I was. I think you understand my situation exactly.

Thanks for the tips on better slabs. I'll keep those in mind. Since I need the instrument mainly for serious (not just beginner-level) practice, touch and feel are probably the most important factors. I actually liked the feel of the DX-640, but the sound left a bit to be desired. I did glance at some web sites and reviews of the ES7, so maybe I'll check that out as well.

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#2107344 - 06/24/13 05:14 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
maurus Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/11
Posts: 794
Don't give up your ideals - work toward a second acoustic piano. They are much more rewarding musically than digitals. That would also be my main argument for your family. After all, it's about music rather than about furniture (even if beloved), right?

If you wish, add a digital as a stop-gap, or as a portable piano. But if so, don't buy below the P155, ES7 class of instruments.

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#2107351 - 06/24/13 05:21 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: maurus]
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
Originally Posted By: maurus
Don't give up your ideals - work toward a second acoustic piano. They are much more rewarding musically than digitals. That would also be my main argument for your family. After all, it's about music rather than about furniture (even if beloved), right?

If you wish, add a digital as a stop-gap, or as a portable piano. But if so, don't buy below the P155, ES7 class of instruments.

Ah, if only.

Yes, of course, it's about music more than furniture. I know that. But it's also about maintaining a successful 37-year marriage, which has been a part of my life much longer than my piano studies will ever have been.

So, no, I'm not going to dig in my heels and stand my ground on this. Not at all. I'm looking for a solution here that accepts the importance of this piece of furniture to my wife.

gvfarns got it right: I need a decent digital instrument that won't dominate the house, much more than I need the acoustic piano of my dreams.

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#2107353 - 06/24/13 05:24 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
rnaple Offline

Silver Supporter until April 24 2014


Registered: 12/23/10
Posts: 1986
Loc: Rocky Mountains
Just get yourself a VPC. It even looks classy. There's a reason why they're selling like cabbage patch dolls did at one time. smile
_________________________
Ron
Your brain is a sponge. Keep it wet. Mary Gae George
The focus of your personal practice is discipline. Not numbers. Scott Sonnon

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#2107362 - 06/24/13 05:44 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
BrainCramp Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/09/12
Posts: 254
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: shepdave
Three different piano techs, over a period of more than a decade, have offered the same evaluation: for just a bit more than the money it would cost to replace damper felts and hammers, the instrument--never very high-quality in the first place--could be replaced by a reconditioned Yamaha or Kawai upright.

Hi Shepdave,

Did the techs say that it couldn't be fixed up, or just that the cost of doing so would be the same or more than the cost of buying a reconditioned Yamaha, etc.?

I'm wondering if the techs just did a dollars-to-dollars comparison, when that really isn't your situation. Your Everett has sentimental value for your wife, and it sounds like it's going to keep taking up space in the house even if no one plays it.

It might be worth more in overall happiness to spend "more than it's worth" to get it fixed up if possible.

I have an old car that I love. Its blue book value is probably only about $1500, but I keep spending thousands to keep it on the road. I like the car, and nobody makes a similar car right now. So the maintenance cost isn't technically "worth it", but to me it's well worth it.

I ask because I grew up with a 1950s Everett "Dyna-tension" console. It's still going strong.

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#2107391 - 06/24/13 06:39 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
Thomas Williams Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/18/04
Posts: 62
Loc: NJ, USA
Thanks for the clarification, shepdave. Stating that you need an instrument for "serious practice" helps a bit -- I would agree with the commentator who advised staying away from the lower class of digitals, for that purpose. I had a Korg SP-250 for a while, which is fairly close to the lower end, and it turned out to be terrible for more finessed playing. (Felt like practicing on it was messing up my technique, even though playing big, bombastic stuff on it felt very good initially.) So I decided I had to sell it (and thankfully, digital pianos don't depreciate quite as much as cars) and upgrade. I now have a Roland FP7F, and it is AWESOME. I am very satisfied with it, and even quite inspired when practicing on it. As gvfarns mentioned, you might be able to find a closeout deal on that model, as I did; otherwise, there are new models that are pretty much equivalent. I've never tried playing the FP4F (or new FP50), but my understanding is that those are cheaper, weigh less and have a different action, but have the same awesome sound engine. The feel may or may not be to your liking. And I do like the feel of the Kawai MP series DP's that I've tried, although I have little experience with them. These are all slab-style models (or stage pianos) -- I also didn't want mine to be a full console model.
_________________________
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-hvAs0rvMk

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#2107401 - 06/24/13 07:01 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: rnaple]
Tritium Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/19/13
Posts: 179
Loc: Western MA, USA
Originally Posted By: rnaple
Just get yourself a VPC. It even looks classy. There's a reason why they're selling like cabbage patch dolls did at one time. smile


Huh?? With all due respect, Rnaple, that does not seem like optimum advice, nor an ideal solution for Shepdave, given his comments and stated background and objectives. The VPC appears to be a wonderful solution for gigging and/or recording musicians, as well as those who have a good laptop/computer and experience in using 3rd party piano software.

However, I get the sense that Shepdave wants something to replace his old Spinet style acoustic piano, and the ability to sit down and just PLAY, at any time, without worrying about booting up a separate computer, and perhaps even having to use additional peripherals (such as active monitors).

I may be wrong, but I get the sense he is looking towards a self-contained digital piano solution, which means a console or slab type DP with built-in speaker system.

Given that, there appears to be some great solutions available from Casio (the new PX-780/750 or 850) Kawai (e.g. ES7), and Roland, as well as Yamaha.


Edited by Tritium (06/24/13 07:06 PM)

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#2107407 - 06/24/13 07:12 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
Vid Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/12/01
Posts: 808
Loc: Vancouver, B.C.
I think for most uprights in general and especially for spinets in particular it is not worth the money to restore.

That said unless the OP is technically inclined and has interest in piano software I wouldn't recommend the VPC1 either. A more standard console or slab with sound engine and speakers is probably what is required.
_________________________
Kawai VPC1, Pianoteq, Galaxy Vintage D

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#2107412 - 06/24/13 07:19 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: Tritium]
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
You're right, Tritium. Once I figured out what VPC stood for (which took a little bit of looking around grin), I came to the same conclusion. I don't anticipate being eager to hook up to my MacBook Pro every time I want to play.

I need something I can put away easily, set up easily, plug a pair of headphones into, and feel like I'm playing a decent piano. Ability to take it elsewhere, away from home, and know I have a quality keyboard to play, is also a plus. (But that's not the main idea.)

After all the helpful comments here, I'll probably start looking now at the ES7, MP6, FP80 range of DPs. Self-contained, slab, very good weighted keyboard, good grand piano sound.

And as other people offer other advice, I'll appreciate that as well.

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#2107423 - 06/24/13 07:38 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: BrainCramp]
dmd Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/15/09
Posts: 1779
Loc: Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: BrainCramp
Originally Posted By: shepdave
Three different piano techs, over a period of more than a decade, have offered the same evaluation: for just a bit more than the money it would cost to replace damper felts and hammers, the instrument--never very high-quality in the first place--could be replaced by a reconditioned Yamaha or Kawai upright.

Hi Shepdave,

Did the techs say that it couldn't be fixed up, or just that the cost of doing so would be the same or more than the cost of buying a reconditioned Yamaha, etc.?

I'm wondering if the techs just did a dollars-to-dollars comparison, when that really isn't your situation. Your Everett has sentimental value for your wife, and it sounds like it's going to keep taking up space in the house even if no one plays it.

It might be worth more in overall happiness to spend "more than it's worth" to get it fixed up if possible.

I have an old car that I love. Its blue book value is probably only about $1500, but I keep spending thousands to keep it on the road. I like the car, and nobody makes a similar car right now. So the maintenance cost isn't technically "worth it", but to me it's well worth it.

I ask because I grew up with a 1950s Everett "Dyna-tension" console. It's still going strong.


This would be my choice for the "best" solution.

If you can get your spinet restored to "good" condition, go for it. Your wife will love it (not to mention, you) and you get a nice acoustic to play on. No Brainer.


P.S. Now, that works ... ONLY IF YOU LIKE TO PLAY THE SPINET. If not, then forget it.



Edited by dmd (06/24/13 07:41 PM)
_________________________
Don

My current system: Kawai ES7 + Focal CMS40 Powered Monitors, SennHeiser HD555 Phones, Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 audio interface, Mackie ProFX8 Mixer, Ravenscroft275, True Keys American Grand, Ivory II American Concert D, Steinway Basic, Galaxy Vintage D, True Pianos, Pianoteq, Alicia's Keys

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#2107505 - 06/24/13 10:47 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: dmd]
rnaple Offline

Silver Supporter until April 24 2014


Registered: 12/23/10
Posts: 1986
Loc: Rocky Mountains
Originally Posted By: shepdave
You're right, Tritium. Once I figured out what VPC stood for (which took a little bit of looking around grin), I came to the same conclusion. I don't anticipate being eager to hook up to my MacBook Pro every time I want to play.
And as other people offer other advice, I'll appreciate that as well.


My big intention was sound quality. The resultant expressiveness. That's all. Although my software piano's aren't a real grand. They come much closer than what the manufacturers are putting in their DP's.
It's pretty impressive when I hit my sustain pedal and I can hear the strings vibrate. Or hold a key down and it just keeps sustaining like a real grand piano does. Or the dynamic range, touch sensitivity, velocity response. The sound walks all over what the manufacturers are building into their DP's.
My Keyboard stays connected to my computer all the time. Doesn't take much to bring it up.
Since you have a MacBookPro. It will work easy. Won't have all the headaches people here talk about with their PC's and software pianos.
And the VPC looks classy enough that your wife wouldn't mind seeing it.
Cost would still be about half of what you'd pay for a good used upright.
Also...I admit....the ES7 ain't no slouch.

Originally Posted By: dmd

If you can get your spinet restored to "good" condition, go for it. Your wife will love it (not to mention, you) and you get a nice acoustic to play on. No Brainer.
P.S. Now, that works ... ONLY IF YOU LIKE TO PLAY THE SPINET. If not, then forget it.



I don't know that any spinet. Even the best spinet. Can play well?
_________________________
Ron
Your brain is a sponge. Keep it wet. Mary Gae George
The focus of your personal practice is discipline. Not numbers. Scott Sonnon

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#2107610 - 06/25/13 02:34 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
Charles Cohen Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/12
Posts: 1180
Loc: Richmond, BC, Canada
Quote:
. . . I played the FP7F, then the P155 and P105 right next to it to compare. In my opinion it outclasses them...for not that much more money when you think about it.
. .


I had a similar experience, PX-150/350 vs. FP-7F. The FP-7F is really good, both in sound and action.

"Not that much more money" is still $700 - $1000. And I don't think _any_ slab piano has loudspeakers that do it justice. If you haven't tried the digipianos with headphones, you really should. You might want to budget for a better loudspeaker/amp (or two of them).

I think leaving the old upright dusted, and unused, is illogical -- but that's how people are, about stuff with lots of memories attached to it. I have a boat that I'm finding it hard to part with . . .

. Charles

PX-350 owner

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#2107636 - 06/25/13 04:50 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
sandalholme Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/31/09
Posts: 760
Loc: Dorset, UK
After over half a century of owning acoustics, right up to a concert grand for a while, for reasons outlined in other threads, I have moved to digital: Kawai ES7. There are other comparable makes/models, but the ES7 with its 3 pedal stand makes for a nice piece of furniture.

A DP takes a bit of getting used to, it's true, but my experience is of getting at least as much pleasure from playing it straight out of the box and then playing the 3 "pianos" I now have configured for myself. Until my acoustic grand was shipped out I spent more time playing the ES7 - not that I am saying it's better, it's different.

Yes, I have added a software harpsichord and software organ. Will soon add a software piano, but these are optional. The ES7 sounds good through its speakers with its native sounds, such that I have played it in public to critical and surprised, for some, acclaim (for the sound!) Not able yet of course to say how long the action will stand up to my lengthy playing of Beethoven, Brahms, Rachmaninov etc.

If anyone has an AP that is not worth repairing and cannot replace it, for whatever reason, a goodish DP is a good option, not a poor one.

Don't let people persuade you that the only piano worth having is an AP. Try as many DPs as possible (and APs for comparison) and let your hands and ears guide you to a decision that's right for you.

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#2107648 - 06/25/13 06:07 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
shepdave, I have read your post, here:

As you can see from my post count (assuming you're reading this in 2013), I haven't posted much here, but I've been lurking.

I am deep into middle age (late 50s) and a lifelong musician. I gigged for many years in Nashville as a bass and rhythm guitar player. About 3-4 years ago I decided to try to learn jazz piano. I have an excellent teacher here in the Northern Virginia suburbs of DC, and it's going well.

But the piano in my house, an Everett spinet from the 1950s, is rather frustrating. It's got a rather uneven voice, questionable damping, and even some notes that growl a bit (including the all-crucial middle C). Three different piano technicians have advised my wife and me not to spend any kind of money trying to fix it up. I'd like to replace it.

The thing is, though, this piano belonged to my wife's grandmother, and I'm afraid it's here to stay. Every time I have hinted at getting a decent reconditioned upright, I've gotten a very chilly response. At the very least, it seems to be a permanent piece of legacy furniture in our living room.

So I've been thinking that I should maybe find a decent slab-style DP, just so I can play on a keyboard with a reasonable and even touch. I'm nowhere near needing something to play gigs, and I think I'm past the time in my life where I'm going to be doing a lot of living-room demos requiring a slew of different instrument sounds. Just decent grand piano; maybe also B3 organ and Fender Rhodes-ish voices.

After poring over these forums for a couple of days, I went over to the local Guitar Center this morning and messed around with a Casio PX-150, a Yamaha DX-640 (way more instruments than I need, but very nice touch), and a Yamaha P-105. Reading these threads moves me toward something like a Yamaha P-155.

Can anybody give me some guidance?

__________________________________________________

For me, I played a sax in a few bands, a beginner player at 40. At 62 I dusted of my old Clavinova that had been gathering dust 20 years. I accidentally fell in love with the piano after a year. The clavinova was great, nice sound, big built-in speakers.

As when I was a kid of 7, my father ended up with a piano that was called a birdcage - means in piano language it was cheap and bad. It had ivory keys that were worn. It was never tuned. It had 66 keys, so a 3/4 piano. We moved into a trailer 6 feet wide and 34 feet long. No room for a piano of any size. Digitals didn't exist then in 1956. It had a 3/4 inch plywood case painted pink because it was taken to the Yukon during the Gold Rush.

So after playing the piano working my way through Leila Fletcher Piano Book 1 - I remembered that pink piano I played for a very short time. I asked a few piano stores if the knew of a piano that had cigarette burns and bullet holes that was playable. I had limited funds, had serious health issues, and when I got a call from a piano store telling me they found a piano, I said it was a little over my budget - and then I thought for a moment, remembered that friends and doctors said I almost died. So I asked myself, if I played the piano once or twice and died, would I be sorry, if I spent the money and then died, and the answer was clearly, no. I am still alive and I love my acoustic piano. Yes, I have a great digital slab, a Yam P95, and, of course, a Clavinova.

Digitals are great because you can play them with earphones 24/7/365. But I would take an acoustic piano because it is a piano. I am now 63, and I want to play an acoustic until I die. If you can only have one piano in the house, let it be an acoustic of any condition, and throw a cheap digital in the truck of your car - if you must.


Edited by Michael_99 (06/25/13 06:18 AM)

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#2107674 - 06/25/13 08:10 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
BrainCramp Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/09/12
Posts: 254
Loc: USA
Shepdave,

One thing you might consider doing is finding your Everett's serial number and looking it up on the Yamaha web site here:

http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/CDA/ContentDetail/Text_WithCatMenu_SC/0,6381,CNTID=12174&CTID=410010&VNM=LIVE&AFLG=Y,00.html

Then post a note in the Technician's forum to see if anyone has any experience with Everetts of that type and vintage.

I think the first question you'll get about a 1950s Everett is whether you're sure it's a spinet and not a console. So you'll want to measure its height and mention that in your posting.



Edited by BrainCramp (06/25/13 08:28 AM)
Edit Reason: added spinet vs. console note

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#2107686 - 06/25/13 08:44 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
BrainCramp, the Everett works fine. It's not broken. It's just not very good, and I don't like playing it very much. It has a thin sound, little to no damping, and an uneven action.

I'm not trying to fix it up. I'm trying to find a piano that's more fun to play.

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#2107708 - 06/25/13 09:36 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
BrainCramp Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/09/12
Posts: 254
Loc: USA
Sorry Shepdave, I didn't mean to be pushy.

Your original post was titled "Should I get a digital?". But it sounds like it should have been "Which digital should I get?", since the other options you mentioned were never really options.

People here aren't mind readers, they're just trying to help.

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#2107716 - 06/25/13 10:07 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
shepdave, I have read your post, here:


BrainCramp, the Everett works fine. It's not broken. It's just not very good, and I don't like playing it very much. It has a thin sound, little to no damping, and an uneven action.

I'm not trying to fix it up. I'm trying to find a piano that's more fun to play.


________________________________________________

Thanks for the enlightenment. The difference between the digital and the acoustic is what the digital piano world call decay. It is an awesome word because it means when you hit or strike a key on the digital, by the count of 8, the sound has decayed (died a sad death). So if you play a piece and the note is a whole note and is to be held for 2 measures - the sound dies before the count of 8. The digital world will say, well, it depends on how slowly you count. Good, answer, except I disagree. Of course, you can do that test on your Everett and you can do it on whatever digital you play. You will find it interesting. Any note that decays before the count of 8, in my opinion, is a dead note, and I say if a note dies before its time, is a thin sound - something you were looking.

Having said that, I love my two digitals, and if they made a 48 weight keyed piano, I would buy it instantly - at almost any price - because I could take it with me anywhere on the planet 24/7/365 for the rest of my life.

cheers,


Edited by Michael_99 (06/25/13 10:11 AM)

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#2107718 - 06/25/13 10:22 AM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: Michael_99]
gvfarns Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/16/07
Posts: 3483
Loc: Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: Michael_99
shepdave, I have read your post, here:


Michael_99, you can use the quote button when you reply. That way it's obvious to readers what is being quoted. The way you have been quoting people is confusing and hard to read.

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#2108027 - 06/25/13 06:32 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: gvfarns]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
gvfarns, I have read your post, here:

Originally Posted By: Michael_99
shepdave, I have read your post, here:


Michael_99, you can use the quote button when you reply. That way it's obvious to readers what is being quoted. The way you have been quoting people is confusing and hard to read.

___________________________________________

Thanks for your helpful suggestion. You should know that I am dyslexic. I have memory problems and I can't see the quoted material until I scroll it time and time again. Also it is darker background and size of font is smaller. It may work for the rest of the world, but it doesn't work for me. I appreciate that much of what I post is not understood and I accept that most people get confused of what I post, but as a dyslexic, that the is the price of trying to do ones best in the real world.


Edited by Michael_99 (06/25/13 06:35 PM)

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#2108041 - 06/25/13 06:52 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: Michael_99]
maurus Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/11
Posts: 794
Michael_99, don't let these questions about your way of posting bother you. I, for one, fully understand, and accept your way of posting.

For all others: What we may see as an idiosyncrasy may be, for some, a rescue. We all have our own little oddities, in one way or the other.

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#2108074 - 06/25/13 07:48 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
berninicaco3 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/14/13
Posts: 103
Loc: iowa city, ia
I just went through the same question myself.

Agreed on the spinet. I don't think they were ever good pianos, or even ever could be. Just the physics of their small size no matter how well built. They aren't too heavy though, and I think maybe that's why they ever sold at all.

One major question is budget, and, will you remain at the same place for many years?

Electronic pianos don't need tuning, and you can carry them under your arm. If it has a stand, well, unscrew it, then you carry it under your arm. It's still feather light next to a full upright. Those are huge advantages. There are no tunings to pay for, and from what I've heard, the things that can go wrong (keys still have moving parts, sensors, motherboard, etc.), often really don't go wrong until after the piano has given its value anyway.

I opted for an acoustic... but it's still a dicey toss up. It was heavy and expensive to move, and (I did know ahead of time, don't worry), it needs repairs. It's a 5'6" grand piano, and the repairs are still just barely worth it, or maybe not quite worth it in fact. So I hear you on your spinet.
My 'new' grand is mahogany with ivory keys, and was at least once a decent piano, though never first-rate. It only needs bass strings to be playable. Whether i go further to improve tone or simply to invest in its lasting 3 more decades is up to me and my budget. It isn't a basket case, and I'm still being shot down by some in the piano technician threads smile But we don't all have $15000 for a new grand piano.

For the same money I could have had a casio px-850 at my door by now. I wouldn't have nearly as much fun fixing it... but that's just me. Buying a new digital is stress free. Buying a used upright is like buying a used car; maybe it's a fun game, or maybe it's frustrating and expensive.
ESPECIALLY if you're going to move soon, digital is very advantageous.
The actions are not bad if you have $900-$1500, and the sound is BETTER than you'll get in a 2nd hand worn-out acoustic for that same price range.

Like I said, I was looking at the px-850 for the best classical piano replacement (not a synthesizer, etc) in my budget. Musiciansfriend has another 15% off sale (maybe they do that every month) that keeps it at $850 delivered.
But there seem to be rave reviews over the kawai es7 for duplicating a concert grand really, really well. If you have nearly $1500.


Edited by berninicaco3 (06/25/13 07:57 PM)

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#2108126 - 06/25/13 09:37 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: maurus]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
maurus, I have read your post, here:

Michael_99, don't let these questions about your way of posting bother you. I, for one, fully understand, and accept your way of posting.

For all others: What we may see as an idiosyncrasy may be, for some, a rescue. We all have our own little oddities, in one way or the other.

_____________________________________________

Thanks, maurus, for your kind thoughts. Your feedback is appreciated.

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#2108150 - 06/25/13 11:02 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
maire8 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 06/24/13
Posts: 9
Shepdave, I have no advice, but just wanted to say that I get where you're at. I'm in a similar situation with my Lester 1940s-era "Betsy Ross" spinet. Different keys have been going defunct on it, the most recent being one right in mid-range. (This link describes the problem in case anyone is interested or thinking about telling me to get it fixed - looked into that already and it's totally not worth it given the cause of the problem: http://blog.mpstrax.net/piano-buying/run-away-now-pianos-part-2/ )

So anyway...I'm looking at digitals too now, needless to say. Just wanted to chime as someone who can relate.

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#2108151 - 06/25/13 11:08 PM Re: Should I get a digital piano? [Re: shepdave]
shepdave Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/31/10
Posts: 42
Loc: Vienna, VA
Oh, maire8, when you typed the word "Lester," you took me back to my childhood. I was just telling my teacher on Saturday about the first piano my parents had in our house when I was a little kid. It was a Lester player upright. Just talking with my brother today, who is in town visiting, reminded me of that old player piano and the rolls my parents had (mostly Broadway show tunes from the 1940s).

It wasn't a very good instrument, of course, and my parents sold it for a ridiculously low price when we moved a few counties over right when I began 8th grade in school. But it was a player piano, and therefore had an enormous "cool factor" that I couldn't appreciate when I was a kid.

But, yeah, I imagine it would fall into that "not worth fixing up" category.

Incidentally, since I started this thread yesterday, I've talked with my wife about my idea of getting a decent DP in lieu of replacing the Everett. She seems pretty enthusiastic about that idea, so I guess that's what I'll do at some point in the next couple months.

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