Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Topic Options
#2105741 - 06/21/13 12:53 PM How would you go about a jam session?
John_In_Montreal Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/21/11
Posts: 399
Loc: Montreal Canada
Hi Everyone,

Recently, a work colleague who is about 1 year into guitar learning, plays by ear mostly and has little knowledge of music theory, recently asked if we could jam together at lunchtime. I was a bit reluctant but finally accepted the invitation this week. I thought it might be fun and a good experience since I have never played with anyone. Boy did my ego take a beating hehe - nervousness, uncertainty, fumbling, forgetting... even if it was all in good fun.

We both have little repertoire so can't start off with much in common and go on from there.

I'm a bit at a loss as to how to go about "getting going" on something - anything! We tried out playing common chord progressions using C F and G but it didn't turn into much nusic in the end LOL. We were going in separate directions most of the time, he played faster than I could. I've trained myself to listen so I listened to the guitar (more than myself, actually I felt drowned but I'll fix the volumes next time smile ) and tried to follow but to little avail, my aural skills are not as sharp as I thought!

So, do you have ideas we could try out so we could both grow as musicians and learn something at the same time? Obviously I guess the 1st thing to establish is in what key we should play. But then, in a jam sesion, should one be sort of the "lead" and the other try to follow? Do we both start something then try to follow each other? I'd rather play at a slower beat but my "partner" seems to prefer going much faster, making it tougher for me to follow. I have more theory than my colleague and my approach to things has always been to try to do things "theoretically correct" - aftr all, there is a logic to music! But I think in this case I might end up trying to be "too theoretical" even in an improvising setting such as this.

Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks smile

John
_________________________
"My piano is therapy for me" - Rick Wright.
Instrument: Rebuilt Kurzweil K2500XS and a bunch of great vintage virtual keyboards. New Kurzweil PC3X.

Top
(ads P/S)

Sauter Pianos

#2105751 - 06/21/13 01:11 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
Rickster Offline


Registered: 03/25/06
Posts: 8357
Loc: Georgia, USA
Over the years, I’ve always enjoyed “jamming” and playing music with others. I really enjoyed playing with someone who could play better than I could, because that is how you learn, as a general rule. On the other hand, and not to be critical, some individuals simply do not have the ability to keep time and follow along; even if they have the chord progressions down pat, they still can’t keep time.

However, we can always make improvements, and no one ever completely masters an instrument, (though some come close).

Yesterday at my workplace, I got to jam/play with some excellent musicians… a couple of the fiddle players were as good as any pro I’ve ever heard. I played my 5-string banjo and we played some standard blue-grass tunes, folk tunes and Gospel tunes. It was a lot of fun, and we attracted a small audience that seemed to enjoy it a lot.

I was pretty rusty on the 5-string banjo, as I have focused my energy on the piano for last few years.

Jamming is a good thing, and a lot of fun. Keep it up! As far as how to jam, just do what comes natural… smile

Rick
_________________________
Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel

Top
#2105802 - 06/21/13 02:34 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
Kymber Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/25/08
Posts: 1348
Loc: MA
What are you trying to accomplish? Do you just want to improvise something?

I think in your case, since you say you don't have a lot of experience jamming I would choose a song you both will enjoy - learn it on your own and then during your jam session you can work out your timing etc (probably would be good to start of slowly then speed it up as you both get in sync with each other. I think it would be different if you had more time but since it's just a lunch hour I think you will each will have to do some practicing/prep work on your own for you jam sessions. But without some kind of goal or direction you might end up wasting your lunch time jam session without accomplishing anything.

That comes from experience. I used to jam with a guitarist (me on bass). We would agree on songs to learn, practice, and have ready for our jam session. But, somehow she would never end up learning the ones we discussed so it was kind of a waste of time. When we did have it together (I think we had two songs in total) it was a lot of fun.

Just a thought thumb
_________________________
“The doubters said, "Man cannot fly," The doers said, "Maybe, but we'll try,"
And finally soared in the morning glow while non-believers watched from below.”
― Bruce Lee

Top
#2105811 - 06/21/13 02:57 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3158
I think you are taking the concept of "Jamming" to its assumed extreme, which (I think) is musicians just playing together, with no focus or direction.

That does not work.

You have to have some common denominator, i.e. some song(s) that you both know, to play together, in the same key.

If you go to jam sessions (usually held in bars), there is always an agreed-upon song to play. If the song isn't named, its often a Blues, which can be generic, but folks playing know what that is, so by default, it is a known song.

The "Jamming" part of a jam is that the musicians are not a working band, so are likely playing together for the first time, so it is unrehearsed.

So maybe a better name is "unrehearsed playing of known songs".

Bottom line...there must be a common structure to follow, i.e. a known song. Otherwise it is a mess.

The exception is accomplished musicians who appear to not be following any song or pattern, but they are, but spectators might not be aware of it.

Try going to some local jams, not specifically to play, but to see what it is all about.

And, have fun!

ps...with your Guitar friend, if he wants to play too fast, try switching over to you playing Bass on the piano, with an occasional RH chord at the chord changes. Part of Jamming is to fit in where you can.
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

Top
#2105929 - 06/21/13 07:24 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
Brent H Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/06/11
Posts: 843
So let's take the non-improvisational "playing an agreed upon song together" type of jamming...

What kinds of things can a near-beginner guitar player and a near-beginner piano player do to play together?

With zero experience, the only thing that comes to my mind is maybe I just play a familiar piano-solo arrangement of some song while the guitar player strums the chords. Or maybe if the guitar player is up to playing some melodic lines the piano player could play the whole arrangement on one verse, then just play the left-hand and lower right-hand voices the second time through and let the guitar player do the melody.

Maybe there's more to it I can't quite imagine. If the guitar player could really play (more than just knowing some chords and scales/pentatonics) I guess he could play a complete accompaniment and maybe let the piano player do just a melody line or something like that.
_________________________
Current Life+Music Philosophy: Less Thinking, More Foot Tapping

Ars Longa, Vita Brevis

Top
#2105936 - 06/21/13 07:35 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3158

Try to think like a band...what would the bass player play, what would the person doing the melody play (that could be any instrument, or a singer), what would be played for rhythmic chords, and so on.

And if one instrument is playing, say, the melody, the other(s) should not: They should keep out of the melody player's space, and play one of the other parts.

Also, it depends on what style of music you are playing. Classical guitar and piano is one thing...whereas Pop music or Blues or Jazz or Country or Gospel is typically made up of three parts, a Bass line, rhythmic chording, and a melody.

Piano can play Bass with the left hand, even if it is just riding one note, such as a lower C, on the beat.

Piano can then play a C chord on the off beat (the "and" of One - And - Two - And, etc).

Meanwhile, the Guitar can play a melody line.

Then they can switch, with the Piano playing the melody, and the guitar the chords.

PS...it might be helpful to find a guitarist who teaches, and who plays in bands, and get together for a lesson or two with him/her to show you how to play with someone else in a hands-on situation.
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

Top
#2106075 - 06/22/13 03:24 AM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
Charles Cohen Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/12
Posts: 1117
Loc: Richmond, BC, Canada
you have learned a lesson:

. . . Improvising is not easy!<g>

. . . Improvising with someone else is harder.

Rocket88 has it right -- you need _some_ structure! It may be explicit ("We're playing 12-bar blues") or implicit ("we've been playing together for 3 years, and can read each others' intentions").

I am (maybe excessively) enthusiastic about Tim Richards "Improvising Blues Piano". If you're able to play his bass lines (mostly not difficult), and the guitar player knows what "12-bar blues" means, you should be able to get together and make music.

Improvising on a pop tune is certainly possible. But first, you have to be able to play it straight -- both hands, proper tempo. And you should understand its harmonic structure (sometimes not simple!) before you start playing games with the melody.

Start small, work up. It's all music.

. Charles

Top
#2106173 - 06/22/13 12:09 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
jazzwee Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/25/07
Posts: 7060
Loc: So. California
You probably ought to hear what happens at a 'real' jam session, typical of jazz and blues musicians so you have something to compare against.

You get called up to the stage with random people. Then the ensemble will have to discuss what tune they will do. In a jazz case, we refer to "Real Books" (lead sheets). You may or may not know the tune that is called. Or if you have the guts, you call the tune yourself in which case you have the burden of playing the "head" (melody) in the first and ending chorus, determining the tempo, intro, outro, and solo order.

There isn't much time here. Maybe 30 seconds.

Then you count it out, 1 2 1234 and everyone starts. Everyone is in sync. We listen for queues for taking turns at a solo (improvisation). When it is your turn, you want to make sure it sounds melodic and you're in sync with the form (following each chord correctly). This means regardless of what anyone does, you keep a running beat in your head. You have to play in time and not causing the band to lose its groove.

When your solo is done, you are comping (playing chord voicings in the background). You have to be conscious to make it tasteful and not overrun the soloist.

Somebody may signal to take 4's (4 bars each of solo alternating with the drummer), then someone takes the head again. At the end, you listen for how the tune will end. It's not written in. It may be a repeat of some of the prior chords -- called a Tag ending. Maybe multiple repeats. Maybe the band jams at the ending for a long time. Lots of looking at each other to see what will happen.

Then it ends. Whew!

To someone inexperienced, this is rough. One doesn't really do a jam session (around here) unless one is at the peak of their playing skills and need to learn to interact. And you have to do it with other musicians who have lots of experience. It isn't easy.

Taken to the full extreme, I have a live band where we Never rehearse. Each performance is really a jam. We don't know what we're going to play and everything is done by listening. The only thing I bring to the gig is a "Set List".

I describe all this to make one understand that there are a lot of skills that have to be developed, from improvisation, to learning how to react to other musicians, to playing in strict time, to having really good ears. And frankly, there's quite a bit of joy in knowing, in the end, that you can play anything in a band setting when you've learned this. Even tunes you haven't done before.
_________________________
Hamburg Steinway O, Nord Electro 4 HP
My Blog

Top
#2106197 - 06/22/13 12:53 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
jotur Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 5424
Loc: Santa Fe, NM
Hm. Once upon a time I posted in this thread, but my modem's getting squirrelly so apparently it didn't get far enough down the phone line.

I agree with the "common tunes." I think a fake book of traditional music would work well - there's a melody line and then the chord names that both the guitar and the piano can use. That way you have a common set of chords. You may not be able to play the melodies very fast at first, tho you can really play tunes at any tempo you want, but both of you would be on the same page. A very common book is The Fiddlers Fakebook, but they come for mandolins and other instruments, sometimes with tabs for those instruments. The Fiddlers book just has chord names.

I'd look thru Hal Leonard's offerings - it seems to me I've even seen Beatles fakebooks if you want to sing songs and back together.

Cathy
_________________________

Top
#2106344 - 06/22/13 04:46 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
John_In_Montreal Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/21/11
Posts: 399
Loc: Montreal Canada
A BIG Thank You for taking time to reply to my question and being so generous.

This is a rather lengthy reply post!

Originally Posted By: Rickster

Jamming is a good thing, and a lot of fun. Keep it up! As far as how to jam, just do what comes natural… smile


Yes I think it is and hope to get better at it.

Originally Posted By: Rickster
On the other hand, and not to be critical, some individuals simply do not have the ability to keep time and follow along; even if they have the chord progressions down pat, they still can’t keep time.


Yikes! I hope thats not me as I have ambitions to be able to play with other people somewhere down the line. It would be a big setback if I can't do it comfortably. I often practice along with CD's of my fav music, thinking this is part of my learning strategy to play with others. But real, live people is another thing! As I've discovered recently smile

Originally Posted By: Kymber

What are you trying to accomplish? Do you just want to improvise something?
...But without some kind of goal or direction you might end up wasting your lunch time jam session without accomplishing anything.


Developing some improv skills, yes, among other things. More so for me though, the exercise is to learn to play with someone else. I agree that without some structure or framework, it will be a waste of time.

Originally Posted By: Rocket88
...musicians just playing together, ...with no focus or direction. That does not work. You have to have some common denominator, ...


I thought so and you are confirming this!

Originally Posted By: Rocket88
Try going to some local jams, not specifically to play, but to see what it is all about.

And, have fun!

ps...with your Guitar friend, if he wants to play too fast, try switching over to you playing Bass on the piano, with an occasional RH chord at the chord changes. Part of Jamming is to fit in where you can.


Great idea!

Originally Posted By: Rocket88
Try to think like a band...


Yes! That makes sense. You've given me a lot of good pointers in your post, I'll certainly give them my best shot!

Originally Posted By: Rocket88
PS...it might be helpful to find a guitarist who teaches, and who plays in bands, and get together for a lesson or two with him/her to show you how to play with someone else in a hands-on situation.


The thought did cross my mind smile I'm lucky that I work in an educational institution. We currently have a music (jazz) grad student in our temp staff. He also teaches guitar & plays in 3 bands. I'll ask if he would like to help us out. Since he's a kewl guy I'm sure he'll be happy to.

Originally Posted By: Brent H
With zero experience, the only thing that comes to my mind is maybe I just play a familiar piano-solo arrangement of some song while the guitar player strums the chords. Or maybe if the guitar player is up to playing some melodic lines the piano player could play the whole arrangement on one verse, then just play the left-hand and lower right-hand voices the second time through and let the guitar player do the melody.


Good pointers, thank Brent.

Originally Posted By: Charles Cohen
you have learned a lesson:
. . . Improvising is not easy!<g>
. . . Improvising with someone else is harder.


You bet! especially the more or less haphazard way we went about it on this first try. I do pretty decently improvising on my own and you're right: its a different game when someone else enters the picture.

Originally Posted By: Charles Cohen
Start small, work up. It's all music.


That's how I would go about it. Hopefully my partner will go along.

Originally Posted By: Jotur
...I think a fake book of traditional music would work well - there's a melody line and then the chord names that both the guitar and the piano can use. ...
...I'd look thru Hal Leonard's offerings...


Great sugestion Jotur, thanks. I have Hal Leonard's "How to play from a fake book - Keyboard Edition" and have been using it for some time. I'll bring it with me next time smile

Originally Posted By: Jazzwee
You probably ought to hear what happens at a 'real' jam session, typical of jazz and blues musicians so you have something to compare against...
 
...
 
...I describe all this to make one understand that there are a lot of skills that have to be developed, from improvisation, to learning how to react to other musicians, to playing in strict time, to having really good ears....


From your description of a jam session that in the end turns out to be music, it didn't take me long to figure out that yes, "To someone inexperienced, this is rough" smile I'm far from there yet, especially with all the skills to develop. I'm happy to "take the time it takes" to get there, still enjoying the journey even if rough at times. No work, no dedication = no results, no fun, no music! I'll keep working hard and smart, no way I could give up!

===================================================

Everyone, is it a good idea to bring along a metronome, even in this informal setting of trying to make music together? Sure, I could try to count in my head but in this context I think I already have my hands too full hehe smile

John
_________________________
"My piano is therapy for me" - Rick Wright.
Instrument: Rebuilt Kurzweil K2500XS and a bunch of great vintage virtual keyboards. New Kurzweil PC3X.

Top
#2106355 - 06/22/13 05:09 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
rocket88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 3158
Originally Posted By: John_In_Montreal
... I have ambitions to be able to play with other people somewhere down the line. It would be a big setback if I can't do it comfortably. I often practice along with CD's of my fav music, thinking this is part of my learning strategy to play with others. But real, live people is another thing! As I've discovered recently smile


Playing along with recorded music is a very good thing.

I think that one reason you and your friend could not get the music off the ground is, in addition to no real plan, that you are trying with someone who also does not know what to do.

Find someone/people who do, and you might find you can do it, especially since you play along with CDs.
_________________________
Music teacher and piano player.

Top
#2106395 - 06/22/13 06:36 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
peterws Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3409
Loc: Northern England.
Jamming before a live audience? As long as everyone`s got a sense o` humour . . .I got our band to jam "Starwars" one night . . . .we each had a copy of the track.

We needed that sense of humour.
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

Top
#2106669 - 06/23/13 10:56 AM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: peterws]
John_In_Montreal Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/21/11
Posts: 399
Loc: Montreal Canada
Originally Posted By: peterws
Jamming before a live audience? As long as everyone`s got a sense o` humour . . .I got our band to jam "Starwars" one night . . . .we each had a copy of the track.

We needed that sense of humour.


I was dead serious when I sat down and started listening and playing.

Then I quickly got frustrated with my own attitude.

Finally, I couldn't help but laugh and take it all in stride. After all, this was a first and an experiment. We (and our other work colleagues, the audience) had a lot of fun laughing at our efforts smile Its a long, long, long way to Carnegie Hall LOL. smile smile

John
_________________________
"My piano is therapy for me" - Rick Wright.
Instrument: Rebuilt Kurzweil K2500XS and a bunch of great vintage virtual keyboards. New Kurzweil PC3X.

Top
#2106708 - 06/23/13 12:10 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
rnaple Offline

Silver Supporter until April 24 2014


Registered: 12/23/10
Posts: 1957
Loc: Rocky Mountains
Have you ever tried "talking" to another musician with your instrument?
He plays something. You answer. He answers you. Keep going. See where it goes.

BB King loves doing this with other musicians.
_________________________
Ron
Your brain is a sponge. Keep it wet. Mary Gae George
The focus of your personal practice is discipline. Not numbers. Scott Sonnon

Top
#2107019 - 06/24/13 01:47 AM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: rnaple]
John_In_Montreal Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/21/11
Posts: 399
Loc: Montreal Canada
Originally Posted By: rnaple
Have you ever tried "talking" to another musician with your instrument?
He plays something. You answer. He answers you. Keep going. See where it goes.


One of the things we did was that I asked him to play a chord or a simple progression and I would then attempt to identify the chord and play it back. It turned out I was able to ID only about 50%. He knows nothing about standard chord progressions like 1-6-2-5-1, 1-4-5-1, etc. Instead we just played around with the I IV and V chords but I couldn't always follow where he was going. We had no plan, no structure, things were too random; and I kind of just didn't think about suggesting a progression for some reason. I'll work out something more orderly next time smile

John
_________________________
"My piano is therapy for me" - Rick Wright.
Instrument: Rebuilt Kurzweil K2500XS and a bunch of great vintage virtual keyboards. New Kurzweil PC3X.

Top
#2108013 - 06/25/13 06:09 PM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
Steve Nixon Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/18/10
Posts: 216
Loc: Chicago
Hi John,
I would recommend starting with either a 12 bar blues or song that has just 3 or 4 chords. Try Mary Jane's Last Dance by Tom Petty. The verse is 3 chords and the chorus is 3 chords too.

Hope this helps.
_________________________
Free Jazz Piano Lessons Online
www.freejazzlessons.com

Blues Piano Masterclass on DVD
http://www.learnbluespiano.net/

Learn Piano Online
http://www.pianolessonsonline.com

Online Jazz, Blues, & Rock Piano Lessons
http://stevenixonmusic.net/lessons.cfm

Top
#2110093 - 06/29/13 07:40 AM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: Steve Nixon]
John_In_Montreal Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/21/11
Posts: 399
Loc: Montreal Canada
Originally Posted By: Steve Nixon
Hi John,
I would recommend starting with either a 12 bar blues or song that has just 3 or 4 chords. Try Mary Jane's Last Dance by Tom Petty. The verse is 3 chords and the chorus is 3 chords too.

Hope this helps.


Hi Steve,

Thanks for the suggestion! sounds interesting, I'll give it a listen.

John
_________________________
"My piano is therapy for me" - Rick Wright.
Instrument: Rebuilt Kurzweil K2500XS and a bunch of great vintage virtual keyboards. New Kurzweil PC3X.

Top
#2110542 - 06/30/13 09:55 AM Re: How would you go about a jam session? [Re: John_In_Montreal]
joce Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 03/31/13
Posts: 9
Hi there!

I'm not at all professional but I play both guitar and piano. What you can do as a fun improv is agree upon a simple chord progression and tempo. One of you can play the backing chords and the other will take 16 bars of lead. Just make stuff up and take turns playing 16 bars of lead. This can go on and on and if you feel ambitious, you could make up some lyrics too.

Anything goes, just have fun!

Top

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
European Piano Party 2014, Picts & Stories! (Piano Party in Portugal)
-------------------
75,000 Members and Growing!
-------------------
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Seiler Pianos
(ad) Purely Piano Practice Software
Purely Piano Practice Software
(ad) Piano Guide Lessons
Piano Guide Lessons
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
73 registered (Andrey, AndrewAJC, AZNpiano, A Guy, AmateurBob, 28 invisible), 1114 Guests and 27 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
75353 Members
42 Forums
155804 Topics
2287761 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Personal monitors
by Tim K
07/12/14 02:55 AM
Happy Birthday Transcription for the Organ
by musdan
07/12/14 01:41 AM
Casio PX5S. No soft pedal?
by Indra123
07/12/14 12:36 AM
Studio Monitor Info -- Zzounds
by Charles Cohen
07/11/14 11:42 PM
Pictures of my VPC1 setup!
by newbies
07/11/14 11:38 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission