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#2116542 - 07/12/13 09:37 AM Is the score sacred? Apparently not.
Steve Chandler Online   content
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Registered: 02/18/05
Posts: 2700
Loc: Urbandale, Iowa
Saw this article mentioned on another forum and thought it would raise interesting discussion here. I know for some the score is sacrosanct, but apparently it isn't for everyone.

ABSTRACT: Modifying the score examines the practice, sometimes carried out by pianists, of altering a notated musical work by such devices as thickening textures, changing registers or adding pianistic elaborations. In particular, it examines this practice of modification in relation to the music of Liszt. Four main questions are addressed, and these concern: (1) the notional space occupied by modification in relation to other species of work alteration (such as transcription); (2) the modifying pianist’s relation to the score; (3) the effect of modification on the listener; and lastly (4) the article examines why Liszt’s music seems to be the object of modification more than any other composer’s. After examining several recorded performances of Liszt’s music which feature modification, the article’s conclusion is that the practice occupies a notional space not previously theorised although it shares features with philosopher Paul Thom’s notion of “realisation”. <snip>

The full article is here:
http://mpr-online.net/Issues/Volume%203%20%5B2009%5D/MPR0021%20Hellaby%20Final%20Web%20Version.pdf

Discuss


Edited by Steve Chandler (07/12/13 09:38 AM)

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#2116550 - 07/12/13 10:09 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
jazzyprof Offline
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Registered: 11/30/04
Posts: 2621
Loc: Ann Arbor, MI
A large part of Liszt's oeuvre consists of transcriptions of orchestral, operatic, or vocal works. Since these themselves are transcriptions they lend themselves more readily to modifications by the performer who may have his own vision of the original work that was transcribed.
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#2116575 - 07/12/13 11:33 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
JoelW Offline
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Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 4762
Loc: USA
Scores are not sacred.

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#2116580 - 07/12/13 11:44 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
laguna_greg Online   sleepy
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/13
Posts: 1201
Loc: guess where in CA and WA
Steve,

Can you give us some parameters about what you mean, or what you think the article means? Many people think that changing a fingering is a violation of the spirit of the dead composer and their music. I think that's ridiculous, but others don't.

1- If you're asking if it's permissible for people to make arrangements or transcriptions of other people's compositions, then the answer is yes. It's done all the time and by the very best people. However, it is not permissible for people to pass that "arrangement" off as the original work.

2- Is it permissible to make changes to original cadenzas in concerti? If you ask me, yes of course. But your changes had better be as good or better than the original.
_________________________
Laguna Greg

1919 Mason & Hamlin AA
1931 Bechstein C - now sold
http://www.triangleassociates-us.com/about_us (my day job)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Taubman (a recent article I wrote about one of my teachers)

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#2116602 - 07/12/13 01:13 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Louis Podesta Online   content
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Registered: 02/05/13
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First, in his memoir, Earl Wild, who had hands close to the size of a gorillas, made a point of saying that most, if not all, of the pianists of the 19th and early 20th centuries re-worked pieces in order to fit their particular hand. Anton Rubinstein, and his prize pupil, Josef Hofman, both had small hands and did this extensively.

Second, in that I roll the chords, I have re-worked the fingerings and chords for the opening of the Rachmaninoff C# Minor Prelude, and also the "piu lento" C section of the Brahms Op. 18 No. 2 Intermezzo. My teacher didn't play them that way because bringing out certain inner voices is a big deal to some people, and I can accept and understand that. However, the overall musicality of a work is more important to me than getting every single note in the score where it is supposed to be.

Just recently, I noticed that in measure #330 of the first movement of the Schumann Piano Concerto that I can take the E with the thumb of my right hand which makes it a no brainer to play. For the last 20 years I have been playing it with the thumb of my left hand and missing the C# at the bottom half of the time.

I just bought Uchida's Henle version of this piece, and that lady switches things around all over the place. Even though I disagree with most of her fingering suggestions, it shows me that this student of Wilhelm Kempf grew up and studied in a conservatory background in Europe where this practice was commonplace.

I play a ton of Debussy, and I learned from photographs of the composer that this man had fingers like a large spider and furthermore, he was left-handed. So, I change things around all the time. He specifically stated that he did not write fingerings in his scores because everyone has different size hands and fingers.

Leaving the best for last, if you view the documentary of Horowitz's recording of the Mozart A Major Concerto, you will notice (besides arpeggiation throughout) that in measures #108 thru 113, he plays it single notes with two hands.

In measure #15 of the A Flat Major Ballade, both Carl Friedberg (Clara Schumann) and Jorge Bolet (Godowsky, Hofmann, Rosenthal) play it single notes with two hands which makes it about as simple as can be.

So, you just tell anybody who gives you any static about it that a student of Brahms and also the former head of the Curtis Institute of Music both changed things around all the time. Bolet used to refer to score purists as the "Urtext Mob!"

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#2116604 - 07/12/13 01:14 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Louis Podesta Online   content
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Sorry, the Brahms Opus is 118 No.2.

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#2116606 - 07/12/13 01:15 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Orange Soda King Offline
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Registered: 11/25/09
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I'm just going to play what's on the page. However, if it's more of a lighter showy/dazzler piece, I might add my own flair to it. I might still note that I did some "extra-curricular" activity myself, though. wink

Or maybe a transcription... I saw Conrad Tao play Stravinsky's 3 movements from Petrushka, and talked about how afterward he compared the orchestral score with the piano score and slightly changed the piano part so it would fit the orchestral score more.

But my first rule is play what the composer wrote. Many times, I don't think it's appropriate to change/add anything. Seriously; it's not hard.

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#2116611 - 07/12/13 01:26 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Louis Podesta]
laguna_greg Online   sleepy
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Registered: 04/02/13
Posts: 1201
Loc: guess where in CA and WA
Along the lines of what Louis said, here's part of Debussy's (longer, ironic) instructions from the opening of his etudes about finding one's one fingerings:

<<...On n'est jamais mieux servi que par soi-même. Cherchons nos doigtés!>>
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Laguna Greg

1919 Mason & Hamlin AA
1931 Bechstein C - now sold
http://www.triangleassociates-us.com/about_us (my day job)
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#2116615 - 07/12/13 01:37 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: laguna_greg]
Steve Chandler Online   content
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Registered: 02/18/05
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Loc: Urbandale, Iowa
Originally Posted By: laguna_greg
Steve,

Can you give us some parameters about what you mean, or what you think the article means? Many people think that changing a fingering is a violation of the spirit of the dead composer and their music. I think that's ridiculous, but others don't.

1- If you're asking if it's permissible for people to make arrangements or transcriptions of other people's compositions, then the answer is yes. It's done all the time and by the very best people. However, it is not permissible for people to pass that "arrangement" off as the original work.

2- Is it permissible to make changes to original cadenzas in concerti? If you ask me, yes of course. But your changes had better be as good or better than the original.


Just to be clear the article is not mine, I didn't write it. I posted it here because I thought it would provide fodder for great discussion.

Regarding your assertions, I agree with both. In fact according to copyright law even the initial transcription is an arrangement and is not considered an original work. I also agree that changing fingerings should be inconsequential.

As a composer I've heard very different interpretations of my music than my own. In general any changed notes are the result of misreading or simply mistakes. I haven't had anyone embellish my work so I can't honestly say how I'd react to that. In general I appreciate simply being noticed.

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#2116660 - 07/12/13 03:24 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Louis Podesta]
pianoloverus Online   content
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Originally Posted By: Louis Podesta
So, you just tell anybody who gives you any static about it that a student of Brahms and also the former head of the Curtis Institute of Music both changed things around all the time. Bolet used to refer to score purists as the "Urtext Mob!"
But, of course, there are tons of well known pianists who don't or only rarely alter scores.

It's not a black an white issue with all great pianists doing the same thing. Nor is it a question of the two extremes of never altering anything or altering whatever and whenever you want.

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#2116781 - 07/12/13 10:25 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: JoelW]
stores Offline
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Originally Posted By: JoelW
Scores are not sacred.


In your opinion.
_________________________

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#2116834 - 07/13/13 02:13 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: stores]
JoelW Offline
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Registered: 05/25/12
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Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: JoelW
Scores are not sacred.


In your opinion.


I knew you'd come out to play.

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#2116838 - 07/13/13 02:30 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Opus_Maximus Offline
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Scores are not sacred.

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#2116841 - 07/13/13 02:33 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Opus_Maximus]
JoelW Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 4762
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: Opus_Maximus
Scores are not sacred.


In your opinion.

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#2116897 - 07/13/13 08:51 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Orange Soda King]
Mwm Offline
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Registered: 02/20/13
Posts: 752
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
I'm just going to play what's on the page. ...

But my first rule is play what the composer wrote. Many times, I don't think it's appropriate to change/add anything. Seriously; it's not hard.


How do you know that what is on the printed page is what the composer wrote? Unless we check original autographs of the scores, we are at the mercy of the publishers, who are known to have modified works by adding pedalling, changing harmonies and time signatures. I know you have checked various editions of a work and found differences.

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#2116944 - 07/13/13 11:29 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Mwm]
Orange Soda King Offline
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Registered: 11/25/09
Posts: 6070
Loc: Louisville, Kentucky, United S...
Originally Posted By: Mwm
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
I'm just going to play what's on the page. ...

But my first rule is play what the composer wrote. Many times, I don't think it's appropriate to change/add anything. Seriously; it's not hard.


How do you know that what is on the printed page is what the composer wrote? Unless we check original autographs of the scores, we are at the mercy of the publishers, who are known to have modified works by adding pedalling, changing harmonies and time signatures. I know you have checked various editions of a work and found differences.



Well, we can use Urtext editions and do research. It's not hard to find facsimiles of manuscripts. It's also a bit of a case to case scenario sometimes, depending on the composer or the piece.

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#2116948 - 07/13/13 11:35 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Mwm]
NeilOS Offline
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Registered: 08/13/06
Posts: 616
Loc: Los Angeles
The OP quoted an article about Liszt's music. Liszt apparently considered the score to be, if not sacred, at least something to be taken seriously. This is why he reportedly used the score when playing his own music in order to show that it was a composed, serious piece, not an improvisation. In fact, it was the norm to use the score. Of course, performance practices at the time emphasized improvisational skills, which no doubt invited some virtuosi to add their own embellishments to published music. But this, it seems to me, is more about taste than anything else.

As for such issues as redividing between hands, changing fingering or even making small changes to the notes for technical convenience, in my view do not constitute changing the score, given that these changes don't alter the musical intent. The score tells us how the music should sound, not how it feels in our hands.

In our own time, improvisation is not something the audience expects or clamors to hear. Today's audiences presumably come to hear what the composer wrote and not marvel at the improvisational skill of the pianist. So for me, the score is the thing. (I also don't have any particular gift for improvisation or interest in it.)


Edited by NeilOS (07/13/13 11:38 AM)
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#2116958 - 07/13/13 11:51 AM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: NeilOS]
laguna_greg Online   sleepy
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Registered: 04/02/13
Posts: 1201
Loc: guess where in CA and WA
Hi Neil,

"In our own time, improvisation is not something the audience expects or clamors to hear. Today's audiences presumably come to hear what the composer wrote and not marvel at the improvisational skill of the pianist."

That's absolutely true.

However, the question becomes more interesting, and less simple, with people like Liszt and Chopin, who left us as many as 10 very different versions of the same pieces. Which score should be sacred? I'm just asking...

In light of that, I think it's OK to re-distribute the hands when it's more convenient, or uncross them when it's a needless difficulty. Heck, Alicia de la Rocha was famous for leaving a few notes out that her tiny hands simply could not reach. And she played EVERYTHING!!!
_________________________
Laguna Greg

1919 Mason & Hamlin AA
1931 Bechstein C - now sold
http://www.triangleassociates-us.com/about_us (my day job)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Taubman (a recent article I wrote about one of my teachers)

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#2116965 - 07/13/13 12:27 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: laguna_greg]
NeilOS Offline
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Registered: 08/13/06
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Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: laguna_greg

However, the question becomes more interesting, and less simple, with people like Liszt and Chopin, who left us as many as 10 very different versions of the same pieces. Which score should be sacred? I'm just asking...


Hi, Greg

The answer to your question is, pick a version and play it. I've played both versions of Davisbundler, even combined the two. But this is mostly about what repeats to take. If the composer wrote it, play it.

BTW I've been meaning to ask, have you published anything else on Taubman besides the Wiki article? I would like to reference it.
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Blog: http://www.pianoteacherlosangeles.com/

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#2116972 - 07/13/13 12:49 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Mwm]
pianoloverus Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19230
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Mwm
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
I'm just going to play what's on the page. ...

But my first rule is play what the composer wrote. Many times, I don't think it's appropriate to change/add anything. Seriously; it's not hard.


How do you know that what is on the printed page is what the composer wrote? Unless we check original autographs of the scores, we are at the mercy of the publishers, who are known to have modified works by adding pedaling, changing harmonies and time signatures. I know you have checked various editions of a work and found differences.
IMO even if it wasn't possible to use an urtext edition, or the accuracy of the urtext edition was questionable, or there were no online manuscripts to look at...one does the best one can with what one has. In other words, if one wants to follow the score using an urtext edition is the best option. That this option may not be perfect is not a reason not to use it if this is one's goal.

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#2116998 - 07/13/13 01:31 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: NeilOS]
laguna_greg Online   sleepy
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/13
Posts: 1201
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What kind of things are you looking for, Neil? I've published a number of conference papers researching injuries. As a matter of fact, I added a new section to the Taubman article about the published research including my own in the bibliography. I've written a couple of of things for a lay audience, but these are about typing and steno technique, not piano playing.

And to be clear, I was not trying to be critical of your post. Please forgive me if I gave that impression. I was merely trying to point out that, since composers can be ambivalent about their own work, it's OK to re-finger or re-distribute the hands without risking actual blasphemy.
_________________________
Laguna Greg

1919 Mason & Hamlin AA
1931 Bechstein C - now sold
http://www.triangleassociates-us.com/about_us (my day job)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Taubman (a recent article I wrote about one of my teachers)

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#2117022 - 07/13/13 02:14 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Louis Podesta Online   content
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Registered: 02/05/13
Posts: 675
I have a theory about certain teachers in the 19th and early 20th centuries insisting that their students pay meticulous attention to the score, even though they did not play that way themselves, e.g. Olga Samaroff and Anton Rubinstein. That is most of their students were wealthy young adults who often did not feel that they had to practice before their lessons.

Accordingly, they would sit down at the piano, and they would be all over the place when it came to wrong notes, rhythms, dynamics, etc. So, if the teacher wanted to get anywhere, they would insist on a literal interpretation.

Claude Debussy was always scolding people for not playing what was on the page. However, when a young American named George Copeland came to study under him, it was a very different experience for the composer. Copeland had spent years studying under Teresa Carreno (Rubinstein, Mathias) and his playing overwhelmed Debussy with its beauty.

Also, unlike most of those who have posted here, I have spent some time consulting with Dr. Rigbie Turner, the former head of the rare manuscript division of the Pierpont Morgan library. To cut to the chase, there ain't no such thing as an Urtext!

Earl Wild states in his book that when he was asked to perform the Gershwin with Toscanini, there were five versions of the score for the Rhapsody floating around. The cadenzas had not even been written out. To this date, there is no genuine Autograph of the Rhapsody in Blue.

Finally, I was taught by Hank Hemsoth of Texas State University that what is written down on a page of music is only an approximation of what the composer actually hears in their head. Hank got his graduate and undergraduate degrees under John Perry. To my knowledge, he is the only student at UT Austin to every receive a standing ovation from the faculty at the conclusion of his freshman audition (Beethoven 110) and also his graduate final exam (The Petroushka).

Since that time, he has concentrated on computer, and jazz composition and performance. If you are familiar with the piano lick in the theme from the movie "Arthur," that is Hank Hemsoth.

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#2117029 - 07/13/13 02:29 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Louis Podesta]
pianoloverus Online   content
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Originally Posted By: Louis Podesta
Also, unlike most of those who have posted here, I have spent some time consulting with Dr. Rigbie Turner, the former head of the rare manuscript division of the Pierpont Morgan library. To cut to the chase, there ain't no such thing as an Urtext!
I think the last sentence only applies to some works or some composers.

If an urtext is not 100% correct or there were different versions of a piece published during a composer's lifetime, why not do the best with what one has to work with(assuming one falls in the category of trying to play what the composer wrote)?

If one doesn't have a perfect piano should one just not play the piano? If one does not have a "perfect urtext" does that mean one cannot make the best attempt to play as close to the composer's intentions if that is one's choice?

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#2117051 - 07/13/13 03:15 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Pogorelich. Offline
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Altering the score is easy. Following what's there in an INTELLIGENT way and making it a worthwhile interpretation is not easy.
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#2117069 - 07/13/13 03:52 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Pogorelich.]
Steve Chandler Online   content
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Registered: 02/18/05
Posts: 2700
Loc: Urbandale, Iowa
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Altering the score is easy. Following what's there in an INTELLIGENT way and making it a worthwhile interpretation is not easy.

I agree, but the article I linked to start this discussion begins by making the point that a score simply cannot denote a composer's entire intent. It is at best a vague approximation. This would be similar to the difference between an outline and. full novel read aloud by the author. In other words even cliff notes give you more information about a novel than a score gives you about a piece of music. That's why it takes intelligence to interpret music because there's often a performance tradition to follow. Lacking that it's (such as with contemporary music) a matter of creating a musical experience from the score and one's own musical taste (or lack thereof).


Edited by Steve Chandler (07/13/13 03:54 PM)

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#2117070 - 07/13/13 03:58 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Louis Podesta]
SBP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/12/12
Posts: 258
Originally Posted By: Louis Podesta
First, in his memoir, Earl Wild, who had hands close to the size of a gorillas, made a point of saying that most, if not all, of the pianists of the 19th and early 20th centuries re-worked pieces in order to fit their particular hand. Anton Rubinstein, and his prize pupil, Josef Hofman, both had small hands and did this extensively.

Second, in that I roll the chords, I have re-worked the fingerings and chords for the opening of the Rachmaninoff C# Minor Prelude, and also the "piu lento" C section of the Brahms Op. 18 No. 2 Intermezzo.

I've tried the C# Minor prelude, and I just cannot figure out how I'm supposed to play those chords. Do I play them with two hands, or do I play them with one (I have "gorilla hands" that can reach a 12th when called for). Both look and feel pretty stupid to me :\

Keep in mind that in the case of baroque and classical music, improvisation and transcriptions were common and expected. In Bach's case, we have very few authentic Bach autographs (and none of his organ works have any stop registration guides, which means we don't even know how they were supposed to sound!), so we can't really know how Bach would've wanted his works to have been played, although he never played one song the same way twice. This is also true of many performers/composers up 'til the 20th century, when musicians began getting all hot and bothered about "authentic performance".


Edited by SBP (07/13/13 04:02 PM)
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#2117075 - 07/13/13 04:06 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
pianoloverus Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
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Originally Posted By: Steve Chandler
I agree, but the article I linked to start this discussion begins by making the point that a score simply cannot denote a composer's entire intent. It is at best a vague approximation. This would be similar to the difference between an outline and. full novel read aloud by the author.
I didn't read the article, but it's just the author's opinion, right? Personally I wouldn't even call a heavily edited score a "vague approximation" of the composer's intent, but that would depend on one's interpretation of "vague approximation"?

Isn't the title of the thread misleading or erroneus? The "apparently not" conclusion is just the opinion of the article's author.

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#2117104 - 07/13/13 05:19 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Steve Chandler]
Mwm Offline
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Registered: 02/20/13
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I play what is written, note for note...except when I find a note from another edition that I like better. For example, who, in their right mind, would play a D in the alto part of measure 7 of Chopin Ballade 1, instead of an Eb? Yet, one edition I have published a D. Is that score sacred? No way, it is crap!


Edited by Mwm (07/13/13 06:38 PM)

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#2117117 - 07/13/13 05:44 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: JoelW]
Derulux Offline
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Registered: 06/06/05
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Originally Posted By: JoelW
Originally Posted By: Opus_Maximus
Scores are not sacred.


In your opinion.

I think the only way to make a score sacred would be to take it to a church and have it blessed. wink

It is interesting that this discussion is so hard-rooted. I would like to contribute by extrapolating from the movies. When a writer produces a screenplay, they put words on the page for the character to say. But they typically don't provide additional instruction (even an exclamation point can be frowned upon in the wrong context) on how to deliver the lines. The actor portraying the character does that.

I feel similarly about music. The music has to breathe, has to be interpreted, has to be felt. The "actor" performing it can't do that if they are being so restricted by the perfection of a sacred text. It must be malleable, interpretable, given different character by different performers. Otherwise, it is bland and utterly without art.

To put it another way: if I can plug a score into a computer and have the computer correctly "interpret" the music, then it would be "sacred". And I wouldn't go to that concert. wink
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#2117119 - 07/13/13 05:49 PM Re: Is the score sacred? Apparently not. [Re: Louis Podesta]
laguna_greg Online   sleepy
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/13
Posts: 1201
Loc: guess where in CA and WA
Hi Louis<

Originally Posted By: Louis Podesta


Also, unlike most of those who have posted here, I have spent some time consulting with Dr. Rigbie Turner, the former head of the rare manuscript division of the Pierpont Morgan library. To cut to the chase, there ain't no such thing as an Urtext!

Earl Wild states in his book that when he was asked to perform the Gershwin with Toscanini, there were five versions of the score for the Rhapsody floating around. The cadenzas had not even been written out. To this date, there is no genuine Autograph of the Rhapsody in Blue.



I couldn't agree more!

An ürtext is simply a best-guess approximation of what the (scholarly) editors find as the closest thing to a historically authenticated facsimile of the autograph. Which is why every well-done ürtext edition quotes SEVERAL sources for authentication. They often diverge quite a bit. In Bach's case, for example, many primary sources are just plain missing. Oops, no autograph to be had! What is one to do?

My teacher in Paris and his long-time duo partner, Christian Ivaldi, debuted in 1990 a then-recently discovered work of Debussy for two pianos at the Biblioteque Nationale. After, they were both responsible for preparing an authoritative manuscript for publication for Henle. Last I heard, they are still not done with it because they can't reconcile the 3 sources they have - too different, one of dubious origin and historicity, one very badly damaged and hard to make out.

All my history professors in college had prepared scholarly editions of major works during their careers. One of them was responsible for updating three Verdi operas by comparing recently-made-available primary sources from the Hermitage in Russia with those in Italy (he said he had really fun time in Russia when he went). He ran into such problems he actually complained to us students about it.

How about finding the copyist or engraver's mistakes in Bartok's Mikrokosmos? Yes, there are some to be found. And at this late date, you would think that this piece, of everything in print, would be scrupulously accurate as both the composer and the publisher had microscopic control over the finished product, from initial copying to the final engraver's proofs! And the primary sources still exist in good condition!!

I know this really belongs on another thread, but the stories are telling. And useful.

So I still stick by my contention that it's perfectly OK to redistribute the hands in a given work simply for the sake of personal convenience. I really don't care what famous (and other) people have to say about the matter.
_________________________
Laguna Greg

1919 Mason & Hamlin AA
1931 Bechstein C - now sold
http://www.triangleassociates-us.com/about_us (my day job)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Taubman (a recent article I wrote about one of my teachers)

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