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#2132705 - 08/14/13 09:30 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Olek]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: Olek
Originally Posted By: bkw58
Originally Posted By: Olek
the French name of the operation is "aller voir" meaning "going to have an eye on" (as when movers come to see the stairs)

It can be done very fast - indeed some action problems may pass unsuspected, but if the piano is in an acceptable fair condition it is seen very soon.

Nothing really dismounted unless a problem is detected and repairs are to be priced.

The cost is a little less than a tuning.

I prefer to help the customer to find something in their budget, than going on his own selection, with a selection on the CL, a few phone calls, it is easy for a professional to have an idea of the instrument. I get paid for that indeed. I have no much time to do so those days but it happened enough.

Those days when selling a second hand piano, it is not so rare that the customer ask to come with his tuner, or piano teacher.

Well accepted in the trade, but many avoid the situation.

Today home prep, and first tuning is a part of the price negotiation , while yet under evaluated.



Piano purchase prospects are sometimes surprised to learn from a professional tech important info like: the used piano at the store priced at $800 is really a better buy than the same piano on CL for $495. In my area, at least one dealer would add: 1) free delivery, 2) one free tuning in-store and 3) one free tuning later, in-home, 4) a full one year warranty, 5) full price trade-in on an upgrade to a new piano (if done within, I think, one year), 6) financing with little-to-nothing down, and 7)lots of good advice on placement, etc.



yes; certainly. It is more useful when you chase for a good piano and have a decent budget/ Then the tech collaboration is really a must.



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_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2132791 - 08/14/13 12:29 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Then there's the guy who upgraded from a spinet to a small grand piano. He acquired it from an individual who advertised in the classified section of the local newspaper.

Without calling upon professional help of any kind - neither technical writings nor verbal or on-site consult with a qualified tech - he examined the instrument thinking that spotting a problem would be easy. After all, he was a pianist.

After delivery to his home, the piano would not hold a tune - especially in the tenor section. So, he called a piano tech who, upon examination, revealed the presence of several cracks in the harp running diagonally from pin-to-pin about the space of two to three inches. The piano could not be tuned. Given that it was an older stencil piano, any viable attempt at repair would clearly be throwing good money after bad.

This is a perfect example of DIY. A purchase is made, or a repair is attempted, without seeking qualified professional assistance whatsoever: No advance recon. No reading technical writings. No verbal or on-site consult with a technician. He literally does it himself.

He's like the person who buys a product that requires rather involved assembly and doesn't bother to read the directions. Eschewing professional guidance in any form, he takes the plunge. Sometimes it works, others times it doesn't.

But, it is his prerogative to gamble with his own money.

On the other hand, as piano techs it is our prerogative to advise against it.


Edited by bkw58 (08/14/13 12:43 PM)
Edit Reason: clarity
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2132833 - 08/14/13 02:44 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Olek Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7666
Loc: France
The thing is that some DIY are really enthusiastic and so proud of being able to "do something" on their own instrument, that they may be reluctant to accept advise from a professional.
.

I have had that situation sometime, and I understand it as the person knows more or less how far he is from a professional quality, and is a little afraid to have some of his work pointed.

When I really could not understand it, is when it is proposed to learn how to tune a few unisons, and the person yet have a tuning lever and try to arrange some notes sometime.

One proposed explained me that all the piano work was sort of hobby, and he have more pleasure to discover things by himself.

As long as his interventions are only on his own instruments all is well for me.

But the enthusiastic that try to learn to tune and need more pianos to train himself will propose to neighbors and friends sometime. Then ask for a small fee...
Some are gifted when repairing and have enough intellect ability to obtain an adequate idea of what they do. I have seen a few total beginners without any formal training, who are know recognized as experts in a small market "niche" .

The level can be good, but I do not trust it can compare with a properly trained specialist.

Then I have also seen enough repairs done by "experts" that where a little frustrating for the pianist, so I understand that some want to do it themselves.

Unfortunately, when you have worked on concert pianos, you have tonal references that make you hear the defects in repairs, where others will find the job good ans satisfying.
A good musical sensitivity and experience will certainly help DIY and some can finish with some experience, but it is relatively rare in the end.
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#2133264 - 08/15/13 10:13 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Olek]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: Olek
The thing is that some DIY are really enthusiastic and so proud of being able to "do something" on their own instrument, that they may be reluctant to accept advise from a professional.
.

I have had that situation sometime, and I understand it as the person knows more or less how far he is from a professional quality, and is a little afraid to have some of his work pointed.

When I really could not understand it, is when it is proposed to learn how to tune a few unisons, and the person yet have a tuning lever and try to arrange some notes sometime.

One proposed explained me that all the piano work was sort of hobby, and he have more pleasure to discover things by himself.

As long as his interventions are only on his own instruments all is well for me.

But the enthusiastic that try to learn to tune and need more pianos to train himself will propose to neighbors and friends sometime. Then ask for a small fee...
Some are gifted when repairing and have enough intellect ability to obtain an adequate idea of what they do. I have seen a few total beginners without any formal training, who are know recognized as experts in a small market "niche" .

The level can be good, but I do not trust it can compare with a properly trained specialist.

Then I have also seen enough repairs done by "experts" that where a little frustrating for the pianist, so I understand that some want to do it themselves.

Unfortunately, when you have worked on concert pianos, you have tonal references that make you hear the defects in repairs, where others will find the job good ans satisfying.
A good musical sensitivity and experience will certainly help DIY and some can finish with some experience, but it is relatively rare in the end.


Very good points, Isaac. Thanks smile
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2134120 - 08/16/13 11:27 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA

This 40+ year old story comes courtesy of my late "mentor."

It's short.

The guy who thought old bass strings could be renewed by removing the whole set and cooking 'em in oil.

Don't recall what type of oil: motor, olive, vegetable.

Care to guess how that one turned out? crazy
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2134142 - 08/17/13 12:24 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Then there are the folks who use a professional, but do not follow his instructions.

While tuning a church upright, the tuner discovers a serious problem with mice. The little pests are just about to destroy the innards.

Tuner suggests setting traps outside of the piano: kitchen, behind the instrument, etc, because you want to avoid putting poison in the piano, the critters dying in the keybed (a popular nesting place), stinking up the place, and having to pay to have keys removed to get to the carcass.

Six months later, and it's time to tune again. Tuner opens the lid and sees rat poison pellets scattered about the action, etc. Later, when he adjusts the trapwork, an open jar of peanut butter is found next to the bass bridge.

Why peanut butter? Guess they thought it would attract mice into the piano where they would feast on the poison too.

Guess they were also out of cheese.







Edited by bkw58 (08/17/13 12:31 AM)
Edit Reason: clarity
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2142752 - 09/02/13 10:43 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
From the archives:

Guy buys a Steinway grand for a piddling salvage fee. Been in a house fire. Totaled out by the insurance co. "Only smoke damaged with a little indirect spray" he's told by the adjuster.

He totes the instrument to a rebuilder along with a whopper of a check.

After all is said and done, several months later he decides that it's now time to call a piano tech.

Tech arrives. Glue joints are already giving way here and there. And there's no end in sight.

All of this could have been avoided by a simple free phone call to the piano tech (of his acquaintance) who condemned the thing in the first place.
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2143381 - 09/03/13 11:11 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Nash. Piano Rescue]
Ed McMorrow, RPT Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/09/12
Posts: 2117
Loc: Seattle, WA USA
For a serious pianist on a tight budget-the most cost effective way to acquire a grand piano that plays and sounds like a performing piano should-is to collaborate with a tech who is fully skilled in tone-regulation and action rebuilding.

I have some clients who find (for example), a 20YO Samick 6' on CL from a home where it was not played much for around $6K. Piano still looks much like new. I then replaced the hammers, shanks, flanges; key-bushings; repined damper action and whippens; corrected action geometry and strike point; and re-shaped capo dastro bar for another $7K to $8K.

For some $14K they now have a piano that plays and sounds marvelous and is very easy to keep that way even when played several hours a day for many years.

For clients like these I do not charge to inspect prospective instruments.

Nashville might call this "up-selling"-my clients call it wonderful.
_________________________
In a seemingly infinite universe-infinite human creativity is-seemingly possible

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#2144184 - 09/04/13 06:18 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Ed McMorrow, RPT]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: Ed McMorrow, RPT
For a serious pianist on a tight budget-the most cost effective way to acquire a grand piano that plays and sounds like a performing piano should-is to collaborate with a tech who is fully skilled in tone-regulation and action rebuilding.

I have some clients who find (for example), a 20YO Samick 6' on CL from a home where it was not played much for around $6K. Piano still looks much like new. I then replaced the hammers, shanks, flanges; key-bushings; repined damper action and whippens; corrected action geometry and strike point; and re-shaped capo dastro bar for another $7K to $8K.

For some $14K they now have a piano that plays and sounds marvelous and is very easy to keep that way even when played several hours a day for many years.

For clients like these I do not charge to inspect prospective instruments.

Nashville might call this "up-selling"-my clients call it wonderful.



Great example, Ed. Thanks!
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2150991 - 09/16/13 12:46 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Gary Fowler Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/27/13
Posts: 375
As a piano Technician, I don't buy or sell pianos on Craigslist, but I love when people do. They call me to clean up the mess. My services don't come cheap either
_________________________
Making the world a better sounding place, one piano at a time...

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#2150997 - 09/16/13 01:02 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Gary Fowler]
OperaTenor Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/13/06
Posts: 2381
Loc: Sandy Eggo, California
Originally Posted By: Gary Fowler
As a piano Technician, I don't buy or sell pianos on Craigslist, but I love when people do. They call me to clean up the mess. My services don't come cheap either


If anyone talks to me about getting a CL piano, I explain to them that whatever they get will almost certainly need work, and I try to give them a reasonable expectation of what it will cost them. I ain't cheap, either...
_________________________
Happiness is a freshly tuned piano.
Jim Boydston, proprietor, No Piano Left Behind - technician
[url=www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind]www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind[/url]

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#2151284 - 09/16/13 12:33 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Minnesota Marty]
thorn_was_taken Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 95
Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
Originally Posted By: bkw58
Curious as to how often, if ever, do prospects call you to ask about a pre-acquisition evaluation or appraisal on these.

That is a very interesting question.

Over on the Piano Forum, we often get questions about how to proceed with CL purchases. The standard advice is to 'have the piano fully inspected by a qualified piano technician.' I wonder how often this advice is taken.


I recently took this advice. However my tech (who has tuned & maintained my vertical for several years) is ... well, he has rather 'special' taste. And there were things he'd have missed, had I failed to ask specific questions -- like, 'how's the pinblock?' Plus: because my tech wasn't using a printed checklist, the seller was getting -- for free -- *most* of the information I was paying for. So the seller could have told me to take a hike, and added the good news parts of the info to his story for the next interested party.

I did buy the instrument and am happy I did, but my tech did not help my negotiating position very much, so I was essentially on my own.

I'm not bitter. And to cut my tech a little slack -- I don't think he gets called go do evals all that often, plus he may have been caught off-guard by how very present the seller was. I liked the sellers, think they were honest, and believe that the asking price was in the ballpark for what they knew when they priced the instrument. But if I ever have to do this again (I so hope my tech didn't miss anything major -- I do like this piano.), I will hand the next tech a checklist, and ask for checkmarks, notes -- and silence.

And yes, as much as I like my former tech personally, I learned some things about his approach that have led me to decide he will no longer be my tech.
_________________________
thorn

-- Sometimes I poke. Even if I like you.

1920's Mason & Hamlin A

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#2151293 - 09/16/13 12:56 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
thorn_was_taken Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 95
Addendum: This was a CL piano. I had told my tech and four dealers -- two in other states -- that I was looking for a solid pre-owned instrument. Result? Crickets. Nothing.

Finding a good used piano may be easier said than done.
_________________________
thorn

-- Sometimes I poke. Even if I like you.

1920's Mason & Hamlin A

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#2151329 - 09/16/13 02:05 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: thorn_was_taken]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: thorn_was_taken
Addendum: This was a CL piano. I had told my tech and four dealers -- two in other states -- that I was looking for a solid pre-owned instrument. Result? Crickets. Nothing.

Finding a good used piano may be easier said than done.


Thanks, Thorn. Good points. The overriding question is really how to find a qualified piano technician. This too is easier said than done. Often, we suggest that one call the local PTG chapter and get a recommendation there. Though the risk of receiving bad work or ill advice is exceedingly minimized by so doing, such of itself is not a 100% guarantee. It's an imperfect world. We all make mistakes. There are many good techs in the MPTA too. Bunches of good techs belong to neither organization. Another good place to get a recommendation - though not necessarily 100% either - is the local Symphony or the music (piano) department of a University. Also, the better techs tend to be "full time" and booked a few months out.
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2151358 - 09/16/13 03:01 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
OperaTenor Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/13/06
Posts: 2381
Loc: Sandy Eggo, California
This is interesting. For myself, I feel that being able to comprehensively assess a piano is almost as important as being able to tune the darned thing.
_________________________
Happiness is a freshly tuned piano.
Jim Boydston, proprietor, No Piano Left Behind - technician
[url=www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind]www.facebook.com/NoPianoLeftBehind[/url]

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#2151407 - 09/16/13 04:04 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
thorn_was_taken Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 95
My tech is a competent person. As I said, I had used him for awhile. I think part of what was going on, is that he knew I was enthusiastic about the instrument. In fact, he was less critical of it than I was, when what I needed was more the opposite.

I am reasonably certain that my purchase is not a boondoggle, so things so far have turned out ok. I can't have the instrument tuned for another couple of weeks, but it's playable enough that I've been practicing on it. It was just weird to have to prompt the guy. Could be he's very easily distracted or something. I'm just telling the tale to get out there that the evaluation -- even if undertaken by a qualified pro -- can be a little more complicated, and maybe less technical, than one might hope. And seriously. Checklist. Like for a home inspection, just shorter.

I'm working on scheduling my second opinion/first tune. I'll report back on what the next tech says in a couple of weeks. The situation should be far more 'normal', because I now own the instrument. Maybe I'm completely out of whack. If I am, I'll be quick to admit it. I don't know anywhere close to everything.
_________________________
thorn

-- Sometimes I poke. Even if I like you.

1920's Mason & Hamlin A

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#2151450 - 09/16/13 05:09 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Sweet06 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/22/13
Posts: 408
Whats funny is all these professional techs explaining what one should and shouldn't do before they buy a piano. Advice like, "just get a good one". As a total noobie, how does one find a good one? How does one identify a "good" technician vs a "bad" one? Isn't the point of someone calling BECAUSE they don't know what they are doing?
_________________________
"Doesn't practicing on the piano suck?!?!"
"The joy is in the practicing. It's like relationships. Yeah, orgasms are awesome, but you can't make love to someone who you have no relationship with!"

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#2151462 - 09/16/13 05:24 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: thorn_was_taken]
Olek Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7666
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: thorn_was_taken
My tech is a competent person. As I said, I had used him for awhile. I think part of what was going on, is that he knew I was enthusiastic about the instrument. In fact, he was less critical of it than I was, when what I needed was more the opposite.

I am reasonably certain that my purchase is not a boondoggle, so things so far have turned out ok. I can't have the instrument tuned for another couple of weeks, but it's playable enough that I've been practicing on it. It was just weird to have to prompt the guy. Could be he's very easily distracted or something. I'm just telling the tale to get out there that the evaluation -- even if undertaken by a qualified pro -- can be a little more complicated, and maybe less technical, than one might hope. And seriously. Checklist. Like for a home inspection, just shorter.

I'm working on scheduling my second opinion/first tune. I'll report back on what the next tech says in a couple of weeks. The situation should be far more 'normal', because I now own the instrument. Maybe I'm completely out of whack. If I am, I'll be quick to admit it. I don't know anywhere close to everything.


sometime I help to have a better price because some work will be necessary, sometime (rare)the instrument have been so nicely maintened I consider the price asked fair.

The tech is not paid to lower the value of the piano, but to assess its condition and to put a number in front of the job necessary to put it at the same level it would be in a decent (honest) professional place... (on that last I tend to say that chances are that the piano will be better prepped with a direct deal with a technician, but I tend to badmouth about "second hand specialized shops", with some reasons ...)

the tech is supposed to know the market value, but this really is worth for recent instruments , less than 30 years old for instance.



Edited by Olek (09/16/13 05:26 PM)
_________________________
It is critical that you call your Senators and Representatives and ask them to cosponsor S. 2587 and H.R. 5052. Getting your legislators to cosponsor these bills


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#2151476 - 09/16/13 05:41 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Sweet06]
Olek Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7666
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: Sweet06
Whats funny is all these professional techs explaining what one should and shouldn't do before they buy a piano. Advice like, "just get a good one". As a total noobie, how does one find a good one? How does one identify a "good" technician vs a "bad" one? Isn't the point of someone calling BECAUSE they don't know what they are doing?


by exchanging, now most experienced techs have no much time to help someone top find a piano, but you do not need the absolute best one in town, all depend what instrument you are looking for.

WIth some experience a tech can instruct you minimally about pianos, and how to chase for them, so you avoid the gross mistakes, then, there is documentation and forums.

You need to have plenty of time in front of you, and the budget at hand.

After +- 6 months , generally the opportunity appears (sometime less, sometime more)
_________________________
It is critical that you call your Senators and Representatives and ask them to cosponsor S. 2587 and H.R. 5052. Getting your legislators to cosponsor these bills


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#2151522 - 09/16/13 06:22 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Minnesota Marty Online   content

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7439
Loc: Rochester MN
"My tech is a competent person."

Thorn,

He may very well be a competent person, but with everything you have mentioned, he doesn't seem to be a competent piano technician.

Give my best to his wife and family.
_________________________
Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

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#2151599 - 09/16/13 08:33 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Minnesota Marty]
thorn_was_taken Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 95
Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
"My tech is a competent person."

Thorn,

He may very well be a competent person, but with everything you have mentioned, he doesn't seem to be a competent piano technician.

Give my best to his wife and family.


What I think I actually learned about the guy in question, is that he may be the piano tech equivalent of the general dentist. Except that the general dentist would be expected to refer the patient to an endodontist for a root canal rather than undertaking to perform the procedure (and the billing) him- or herself.

PS. I do not intend to hijack this thread, which was plenty interesting before I got here. Carry on...


Edited by thorn_was_taken (09/16/13 08:37 PM)
_________________________
thorn

-- Sometimes I poke. Even if I like you.

1920's Mason & Hamlin A

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#2152176 - 09/17/13 01:20 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Thanks, thorn. You raise a valid point. Piano techs do specialize. Some tune only (in which case they are not really techs). Others rebuild only. Some do everything. Some do everything, but not evaluations or appraisals. All the more reason to ask the tech about his/her services before we secure them.
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2152316 - 09/17/13 05:02 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Gary Fowler]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: Gary Fowler
As a piano Technician, I don't buy or sell pianos on Craigslist, but I love when people do. They call me to clean up the mess. My services don't come cheap either


Thanks Gary: I like your slogan, "Making the world a better sounding place, one piano at a time..."
There's no better place to start than CL pianos.
Those pianos need help .


Edited by bkw58 (09/17/13 05:31 PM)
Edit Reason: clarity
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2152320 - 09/17/13 05:05 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: OperaTenor]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: OperaTenor
This is interesting. For myself, I feel that being able to comprehensively assess a piano is almost as important as being able to tune the darned thing.



thumb
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2152321 - 09/17/13 05:06 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Minnesota Marty Online   content

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7439
Loc: Rochester MN
Mr. Fowler,

Please identify yourself as professional which is required when using Piano World.
_________________________
Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

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#2152334 - 09/17/13 05:27 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Olek]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: Olek

the tech is supposed to know the market value, but this really is worth for recent instruments , less than 30 years old for instance.



True. I also believe that a prospective buyer tends to get a more realistic monetary appraisal from a good piano tech: what the piano is really worth considering above all, it's condition. Never, "what the market will bear" condition notwithstanding.


Edited by bkw58 (09/17/13 05:28 PM)
Edit Reason: typo
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www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2152356 - 09/17/13 05:56 PM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Olek Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7666
Loc: France
Yes, that, plus being able to understand the expectations, customers are sometimes very precise explaining what they wish.

But those are the ones that contact piano technicians, they have yet done some homework, sometime surprisingly in deep.

Now a tech cannot propose a large choice, as it happen in shops, it is more like hunting on CL, so the choices have to be done intelligently.

As there are not so much good opportunities, it is sort of limited.

Also, for the best brands, the dealers also want to buy, sometime at a higher price as they can sell better in the shop, generally with less work done.

(generally)

So one need to be fast to decide when the good candidate is there.
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#2155428 - 09/22/13 08:53 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Detecting the counterfeits (1)

A pianist upgraded to an old "Baldwin M" and paid a local company a large sum to refinish it.

Then she called the tech who, after arriving, made the following observations:

1. Baldwin fallboard decal to match period present? Yes.
2. Baldwin medallion present and re-tacked to it's proper place? Yes.
3. Baldwin "look," ferrule legs, et al.? Yes and no.
4. Size okay? No. Too short for an M.
5. Baldwin indicated in raised letters on the harp? Nothing present at all.
6. Harp match any known Baldwin product? No.


What is it? A counterfeit via a Baldwin decal placed on a refinished, cheap ca.1930s knock-off.


*Clearly, the client came out on the losing end of the deal. This might have been avoided by calling on a professional piano tech to evaluate the instrument prior to purchase.


Edited by bkw58 (09/23/13 02:15 AM)
Edit Reason: *addition/typo
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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#2155434 - 09/22/13 09:02 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: bkw58]
Olek Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/14/08
Posts: 7666
Loc: France
Yes probably, but it relate strangely with the thread, as those may be "professional" job.

A similar thing happen when a brand piano is rebuild with a new soundboard made in a different wood, and with different methods than the original.
_________________________
It is critical that you call your Senators and Representatives and ask them to cosponsor S. 2587 and H.R. 5052. Getting your legislators to cosponsor these bills


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#2155438 - 09/22/13 09:22 AM Re: It pays to use a qualified professional. [Re: Olek]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1749
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: Olek
Yes probably, but it relate strangely with the thread, as those may be "professional" job.

A similar thing happen when a brand piano is rebuild with a new soundboard made in a different wood, and with different methods than the original.


Thanks, Isaac. Good point. I've added a sentence or two for clarity.
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com/

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