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#2147292 - 09/09/13 11:26 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
Ken Knapp Offline



Registered: 04/18/06
Posts: 2200
Loc: Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: The Monkeys

There is no such a thing as can't afford an acoustic, not in North America. Visit Craiglist you can find a free (or almost free) acoustic piano, working one, as long as you are willing to move it.


I think I once heard a wise person once say that there is no such thing as a free piano.. laugh
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#2147296 - 09/09/13 11:48 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
rlinkt Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/08/12
Posts: 302
Loc: CA
I don't think there is much disagreement about the following preference order for playing classical piano:

good piano > good keyboard > no instrument > injuries

Now on to more interesting stuff ...

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#2147297 - 09/09/13 11:52 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
Nikolas Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/26/07
Posts: 5190
Loc: Europe
Originally Posted By: The Monkeys
There is no such a thing as can't afford an acoustic, not in North America. Visit Craiglist you can find a free (or almost free) acoustic piano, working one, as long as you are willing to move it.
Well, here it's not N. America. It's not only the issue of money, but also the issue of space. Some places in Greece are too cramped to fit a real acoustic piano.

And, since I've come across a few free pianos in London, when I was scouting for one, they were awful. A digital piano would be a much better choice for me. But alas it was about 10 years ago and I was still stuck with the idea of an acoustic. :-/
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#2147326 - 09/10/13 12:52 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: rlinkt]
The Monkeys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 420
Loc: Vancouver BC
Originally Posted By: rlinkt
I don't think there is much disagreement about the following preference order for playing classical piano:

good piano > good keyboard > no instrument > injuries


Absolutely.

The question was : good keyboard vs poor to mediocre piano.
Especially with the new insight : keyboard == injury

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#2147419 - 09/10/13 08:07 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3146
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: The Monkeys
Originally Posted By: rlinkt
I don't think there is much disagreement about the following preference order for playing classical piano:

good piano > good keyboard > no instrument > injuries



Especially with the new insight : keyboard == injury


It is a fact that enough acoustic piano playing usually leads to injury. It is not unreasonable that playing digital the same amount would do so as well. (the really serious students who get injured now are mostly on acoustics, because that's where serious students get to eventually)

It is only speculation that digital might be more risky; insight is too strong a word.
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#2147442 - 09/10/13 09:10 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
Marco M Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/28/12
Posts: 451
Loc: Europe
I still after reading through all the thread with great interest find the mayor question implied in the opening post of this thread unanswered. It concerns the general difference in the capabilities to shape the tone of a piano by varying keystroke and key release movements on a digital and on an acoustic piano, and this possibly impacting the education of the piano student in an uncorrectable way.

As a great artist can produce quite useful expressiveness on a digital piano of nowadays standard, it to me seems obvious that learning on a digital should not impose in general any significant drawback in achieving a good playing technique. Expressiveness is achievable on a modern digital instrument and thus it should be possible to study it on the digital.

The acoustic instrument and the digital instrument students initially in their trainings might emphasize on slightly different aspects of their movements to gain expresiveness on their particular instruments, but afterwards, when changing to the other instrument, only some adaption in this emphasis might be needed. I wouldn´t expect that certain movements couldn´t be apllied anymore or even frustrating a successfull change to the other instrument. Isn´t it just the way that the applied teaching program has to be adopted to the particular situation instead of in general demonizing the use of digital instruments in piano education? Couldn´t we nowadays summarize: same approach, slight adaptation phase, same result?

I am almost apt to say, that if a teacher is not able to well teach a student the piano playing on a modern digital piano, then this teacher would for sure also not be able to properly teach any student on a first class acoustic grand piano.
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#2147484 - 09/10/13 10:46 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Marco M]
Farmerjones Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 192
Loc: USA
So in response to the OP: An acoustic piano moves the air in a different way than does a speaker. The demonstration is miked for the benefit of distribution. If there is an electronic circuit involved in the demonstration, all bets are off. If I were standing in that studio, I would assure you I could tell the difference. I don't care about key acceleration, or pedal modulation, if there is a speaker involved, one is at the mercy of it. When in the presence of an acoustic piano, one feels it. As I said, an acoustic piano produces it's sound differently from a speaker, or speakers.

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#2147499 - 09/10/13 11:04 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Farmerjones]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3146
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Farmerjones
As I said, an acoustic piano produces it's sound differently from a speaker, or speakers.


That is certainly true.

Ah, do you ever listen to a CD of a piano performance?

That's a mere digital reproduction. But except for our own playing, and the rare expensive concert, much of our listening to piano IS a digital reproduction.
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#2147600 - 09/10/13 01:52 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Marco M]
The Monkeys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 420
Loc: Vancouver BC
Originally Posted By: Marco M
I still after reading through all the thread with great interest find the mayor question implied in the opening post of this thread unanswered. It concerns the general difference in the capabilities to shape the tone of a piano by varying keystroke and key release movements on a digital and on an acoustic piano, and this possibly impacting the education of the piano student in an uncorrectable way.


While the question is not directly answered, I think the answer is clearly implied, for the responses (and the lack of the responses) :

Get a good piano.

A keyboard is not a piano, a poor piano is a poor piano. Good luck if you are stuck with them, but get yourself out as soon as you can.


I take it. I didn't come here to argue, but to seek honest answers, whatever the answer is.





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#2147714 - 09/10/13 04:12 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Marco M]
TimR Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3146
Loc: Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: Marco M
I still after reading through all the thread with great interest find the mayor question implied in the opening post of this thread unanswered. It concerns the general difference in the capabilities to shape the tone of a piano by varying keystroke and key release movements on a digital and on an acoustic piano,


Shape the tone is unfortunate terminology. There is a lot of good research showing that tone shaping on an acoustic is not as possible as is assumed. And tone shaping (well, decay of tone shaping) by key lift does not seem to be much different between digitals and acoustics. It is really not tone shaping as much as nuances of dynamics (and in the case of the grand, repetition rate) that people find different.

We should also note that playing on an in-tune piano at a very early age can develop perfect pitch. An acoustic piano starts going out of the tune one minute after being tuned. If tuned regularly and maintained in a constant humidity environment, they may not go far enough out of tune to matter, but the reality is that most students play on less well maintained pianos. Many older pianos (most of the free ones) cannot be brought all the way up to 440.
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#2148496 - 09/11/13 10:46 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: laguna_greg]
LesCharles73 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/24/07
Posts: 739
Loc: Denton Texas
Originally Posted By: laguna_greg

Had you even been born then? And by the way, I think Keith Emmerson would argue the point with you, considering he got epicondylitis rather badly that became dystonia from playing mostly electronic keyboards. And the list goes on and on and...


To be fair, Keith Emerson plays Hammond Organs and Moog synthesizers much more than digital pianos. He plays very heavy-handed on unweighted actions (and in many unusual positions). Not saying he doesn't play weighted boards at all because I know for a fact that he does, but I think it's the Hammonds and unweighted synths that got him. This is a distinction that is important to digital players: Digital Pianos have weighted keys to resemble a piano (topic of discussion). Keyboards/synths are generally classified as having unweighted or semi-weighted keys; sometimes 88, many times not.


Edited by LesCharles73 (09/11/13 10:50 PM)
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#2148589 - 09/12/13 04:10 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
stalefleas Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/16/13
Posts: 249
I have seen a video on YouTube where Emerson plays acoustic piano with Oscar Peterson. Not sure who thought that was a good idea. Emerson hammers the keys... Compared to Peterson's nuanced touch Emerson looks and sounds like a novice. I have wondered if this is due to him playing so many synthesizers. This video really does illustrate the differences between a good pianist and a good keyboardist.

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#2148591 - 09/12/13 04:17 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
stalefleas Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/16/13
Posts: 249
By the way I believe keyboards are fine for a beginning student but generally agree that any serious student will greatly, greatly benefit from an acoustic in good shape. It's not a matter of getting a great keyboard or a mediocre piano, as mentioned before, they are different instruments and I think a lot of non-players fail to differentiate. "Oh, isn't that an electric piano?" Perhaps, but in name only.

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#2148627 - 09/12/13 07:37 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
Doritos Flavoured Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/12
Posts: 98
Loc: Brazil
many people with their career at risk here

so, just the kind of BS opinions I expected

the guy claiming about legato and staccato made me laugh out loud: not only did not see the video as probably also thinks digital pianos are the old time digital keyboard with organ action of light keys and no dynamic expression...
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#2148628 - 09/12/13 07:39 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: stalefleas]
Doritos Flavoured Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/12
Posts: 98
Loc: Brazil
Originally Posted By: stalefleas
It's not a matter of getting a great keyboard or a mediocre piano, as mentioned before, they are different instruments and I think a lot of non-players fail to differentiate. "Oh, isn't that an electric piano?" Perhaps, but in name only.


LOL

this one didn't even get on to the digital age

electric...
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#2148631 - 09/12/13 07:42 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: stalefleas]
Doritos Flavoured Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/12
Posts: 98
Loc: Brazil
Originally Posted By: stalefleas
I have seen a video on YouTube where Emerson plays acoustic piano with Oscar Peterson. Not sure who thought that was a good idea. Emerson hammers the keys... Compared to Peterson's nuanced touch Emerson looks and sounds like a novice. I have wondered if this is due to him playing so many synthesizers. This video really does illustrate the differences between a good pianist and a good keyboardist.


it shows the difference between an organist and a pianist

DP are not organs nor electric pianos

go to the store most close to you and try a digital piano yourself
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#2148652 - 09/12/13 09:02 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Gary D.]
Doritos Flavoured Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/12
Posts: 98
Loc: Brazil
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
Originally Posted By: John v.d.Brook
Perhaps the question ought to be phrased somewhat differently. Can a beginner rise to the ranks of artist using only a keyboard as a learning tool?

My answer: we don't really know IF we consider someone who more or less has to start on a keyboard (a number of factors play into this) but is moved over to a fine instrument fairly early.

My reasoning: in doing some research recently I found out that the famous tennis player, Poncho Gonzales, started with a 51 cent racket. He did not even get proper equipment until he started winning important matches.

The best way to go? Hardly. But he was without doubt one of the most incredible players who ever lived, winning major matches against the much younger players even when he was close to and past 40.

It's a lot the same in music. If you give an incredibly talented and motivated young player SOMETHING to play on, then that young player starts to do amazing stuff, most likely (or possibly) someone or more than "someone" will come along to help with "better equipment".

But if you put today's best rackets, with the power and "magic strings", into the hands of the average person, it just doesn't make much difference.

In the musical world, bringing in the tennis analogy and back to Gonzales, that might mean starting on a crap, no action 61 key keyboard - which by the way I also hate - but moving to something better within or shortly after 6 months, then little by little getting better instruments.

Today a lot of kids who have no aunt or friend with a piano to give to them, and whose budget does not currently allow going out and taking a chance on buying an instrument for a kid who has not yet started and who may have no talent or desire, get a keyboard from a friend, or buy something that is a couple hundred dollars.

Then I get some of these kids. Now, as you all can guess, MOST of these kids do not show any huge promise, or desire, or talent, or will power. Would they do better if they had an expensive grand at home? Maybe. But some of them simply are spoiled, lazy or innately so unmusical that the best instrument in the universe would not help them.

On the other hand, now and then we get a kid who just won't give up. That kid will do the best s/he can on an instrument that would stop most people, then people get excited and pitch in. Starting on a crap keyboard - one of those blow the keys down with a weak breath and not enough keys and a tinny sound - does not mean staying on it.

I think most of you work with kids who are way more entitled than most of the ones I start.

I started on a Hardman Peck, quite literally from nearly the century before. It only had 85 keys. It had sticky keys, and it was out of tune, although my parents did get a tech to try to make it work as well as possible

If I had to play on it today, I would quit. I'd rather play on any good 88 key weighted keyboard, a decent one, than that Hardman Peck.

It's all relative.

But yes, playing on any keyboard today just makes me dream of getting back to a grand. Even an upright frustrates me to the point that I don't want to play.

Once you play on a grand, and you master that playing, you just can't go back - not to perform and not to get the full range of sound and touch and everything else.

But the crap instrument was all I had when I started. It was sent down from NY by my aunt. My parents at that time had no money for such an instrument.

Later my parents got a Knight upright, so I only played on a grand in lessons, until I got into FSU. And having only the upright really hurt me, because the Steinway A felt heavy, sluggish, slow, and it caused tension. The instrument was excellent, but I could not master it only playing it in a lesson.

Once I got to FSU I had access to grands, and for the first time I had a chance to compete with other students who grew up with grands in their homes.

Anyone playing on an upright and then trying to enter the world of serious students playing on grands is playing catch-up, in a really huge and serious way.

But the other side of this is that I almost get the feeling that most teachers here would have given up on me because I did not have a grand at home.

I am torn between agreeing that a good grand is by far the best way to go, always, when navigating through the serious classical music world - and also wanting to stand up for all the people who come from a background where the best possible instrument is not an option.

I don't want to see the idea promoted that for anyone who for ANY reason can't get a first-class instrument, the world of music is forbidden, off limits, impossible, etc.

About teaching on uprights:

When Chopin taught on his upright - remember HE played on the upright while his students played on the grand - you can bet that he sounded a whole universe better on the upright. I also think it is highly unlikely that he considered the upright a truly inferior instrument.


best post in the whole thread

then again, Chopin's grand back then was far less grand than grands today
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#2148685 - 09/12/13 10:15 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Marco M]
Marco M Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/28/12
Posts: 451
Loc: Europe
Please let me question it again:
Originally Posted By: Marco M
Expressiveness is achievable on a modern digital instrument and thus it should be possible to study it on the digital.

Originally Posted By: Marco M
I am almost apt to say, that if a teacher is not able to well teach a student the piano playing on a modern digital piano, then this teacher would for sure also not be able to properly teach any student on a first class acoustic grand piano.


If the tone constructs from timing and dynamics alone, as some of you already agreed on, then mechanical playing technique is only of interest for supporting our attempts to consistently generate a well reproducable momentum, and this in the energetically most economical way in order to avoid injuries. Although, some might want to introduce psychological effects, addressing the player´s perception itself, or just doing showmanship for the audience.

We expect at the hammer a constant mass and stiffness and therefore mechanically here only have to think about its speed, while having at the players side several variables to control: the applied mass, applied speed, and varying absorbability and stiffness of in angle adjustable approaching fingertips. But once having these parameters well under control, technique then only has to adapt to different keyweight and energy transfer ratio when moving to a different instrument.
We should be able to adapt without having to change our playing technique, then!

If expression is 'only' about timing and dynamics, shouldn´t a modern digital instrument then not be the same feasable for stuying piano playing as an acoustic instrument, and a good teacher should be able to guide us well regardless of the used instrument?

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#2148694 - 09/12/13 10:28 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
childofparadise2002 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/13/04
Posts: 540
To add to the flame...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/05/techno...ed=all&_r=0

The price, as with all electronics/computers, will likely to drop drastically and quickly.

And this will appeal to the younger generations. My middle school child, who is a serious music student and practices on a grand piano, read this article and said: "when I get out of college and get a job, I want to buy this one".

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#2148709 - 09/12/13 10:53 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: childofparadise2002]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11513
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: childofparadise2002
To add to the flame...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/05/techno...ed=all&_r=0

The price, as with all electronics/computers, will likely to drop drastically and quickly.

And this will appeal to the younger generations. My middle school child, who is a serious music student and practices on a grand piano, read this article and said: "when I get out of college and get a job, I want to buy this one".

That article doesn't add to the flame at all. It's in "journalese" style, written for a business paper that is not involved in music, and thus written for non-musicians. The article makes it sound as though the way digital pianos work is a brand new discovery that Yamaha has just come out with for the first time. I had to force myself to read on.

Then we get to the clip, where we hear something rather nasal and disappointing - they didn't do much with that recording to enhance the sound, did they? The guy playing is banging out the notes, so if the instrument allows for subtle playing, we don't get to hear it.

Finally they don't write or talk about the things that interest pianists or piano students. They talk about how good the overall sound is - not what the pianist can produce on the piano. How do pedals and keys interact? Do you have to dig way down near keybed to get a sound, or does it have more sensors so that you can gently stroke a key for a quiet sound and actually produce a sound?

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#2148716 - 09/12/13 11:01 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Marco M]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11513
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: Marco M


If the tone constructs from timing and dynamics alone, as some of you already agreed on, then mechanical playing technique is only of interest for supporting our attempts to consistently generate a well reproducable momentum,..........

If expression is 'only' about timing and dynamics, shouldn´t a modern digital instrument then not be the same feasable for stuying piano playing as an acoustic instrument, and a good teacher should be able to guide us well regardless of the used instrument?


I have an entry level Yamaha, which nonetheless cost $2500 and was at the edge of what I could afford. I can't get an acoustic in here for other reasons as well. I can and do produce dynamics, and I also have guidance in that matter. HOWEVER, there are limitations. The biggest one is at what point of descent the piano key sensors respond. On an acoustic you only have to go down a fraction and the hammers are sent into motion. With a digital, you almost have to keybed to get a sound. If you are trying to play pianissimo, or if you are trying to play fast, this has a negative impact. There are times when you want to "stroke" the key, like brushing dust off it, and if I did that with my DP the only sound you would hear is silence.

So it is not just velocity and such. I have reached a point where my instrument is limiting me, because there is technique that I know about which I can't use, because the DP doesn't make room for it. That said, even at a student level, and not that advanced, there is still a lot that I can do.

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#2148721 - 09/12/13 11:14 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
childofparadise2002 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/13/04
Posts: 540
Another piece of reading.

http://www.musicincmag.com/Resources/the_ideabox/the_ideamakers/MI0909_TerryLewis.pdf

Whether it adds to the flame, or whether an article written for commercial media is nonetheless valuable, is merely personal opinion.

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#2148733 - 09/12/13 11:45 AM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: keystring]
Farmerjones Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 192
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: keystring
On an acoustic you only have to go down a fraction and the hammers are sent into motion. With a digital, you almost have to keybed to get a sound. If you are trying to play pianissimo, or if you are trying to play fast, this has a negative impact. There are times when you want to "stroke" the key, like brushing dust off it, and if I did that with my DP the only sound you would hear is silence.


That's a good and revealing description. NFN When you hear and see Elton John in concert you're hearing a processed electronic "interpretation" of a piano, but he starts the process with a true grand piano keybead. This tells me EJ knows something about what we're talking about. Real pianistic technique. Refer to my first post about real piano sound and tone. If the word "speaker" or "sample" is mentioned, there's nothing else to say.

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#2148826 - 09/12/13 03:06 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
Vid Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/12/01
Posts: 772
Loc: Vancouver, B.C.
Quote:
On an acoustic you only have to go down a fraction and the hammers are sent into motion. With a digital, you almost have to keybed to get a sound. If you are trying to play pianissimo, or if you are trying to play fast, this has a negative impact. There are times when you want to "stroke" the key, like brushing dust off it, and if I did that with my DP the only sound you would hear is silence.


Some companies are addressing these shortcomings. Kawai in particular with their new higher end digital pianos now feature a more realistic 'grand-like' action. The triple sensors let you press a key down again without having to fully release it so you can play with more speed and with softer dynamics.

The other shortcoming of digital pianos that hasn't been covered here are the sound engines. With some exceptions most digital pianos on the market today rely on sampling technology to produce sound. Since there maybe only a handful of samples per note on the piano the amount of tone color you can achieve is very limited.

Another approach to sound generation is modelling where an algorithm is used to generate the sound based on the midi input. This opens a lot in regards to expression but the result still sounds fairly artificial.

I am a serious amateur player who has practiced on a Clavinova for a number of years. It definitely had many short comings that I began to get frustrated with but upraded recently to the setup you can see in my tagline. It is working quite well and find it takes little adjustment now when I switch to on an acoustic grand. Since it simulates a grand piano action I sometimes feel I'm better off with that instead of an acoustic upright.
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#2148912 - 09/12/13 04:47 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
StarvingLion Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/30/13
Posts: 226
Piano World should terminate the digital piano forum. digital "pianos" and Acoustic piano owners are not compatible with one another.
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#2148919 - 09/12/13 04:55 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
Vid Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/12/01
Posts: 772
Loc: Vancouver, B.C.
What about the ones that own both? Torn from the inside/out?
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#2148934 - 09/12/13 05:10 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
StarvingLion Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/30/13
Posts: 226
The divide between digital and acoustic pianos mirrors today's society. There are going to be numerous threads in the future from digital fanboy's needing attention to justify their social status. Fact is, like I predicted, digital "pianos" are dropping in price like a rock. To compensate, the digital fans will be like a plague of locusts attempting to convert the "unwashed" (acoustic owners) that their technology is superior. It will happen, and you can't say I didn't warn you.


Edited by StarvingLion (09/12/13 05:12 PM)
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#2148939 - 09/12/13 05:18 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: Vid]
Farmerjones Offline
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Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 192
Loc: USA
There's a place for everything. Let's see you turn a Steinway down. Also a DP is pretty much always in tune. That's two big pros. But I don't treat a Telecaster (electric guitar) as I would a D28 (acoustic guitar)There's no discussions like this in guitar forums. There's not millions of dollars spent on R&D to make an one thing behave & sound like another, as there is with pianos. Add to it all the free-for-the-hauling pianos on Craig's List. Add to it nobody play musical instruments today as in the past, period. There's not a dozen people on my side of the state that play fiddle/violin. Local music stores have gone the bigbox Guitar Centers in bigger towns. The economic dilemma that is the high performance acoustic piano, is interesting. I think Yamaha has it figured out. Build p95s to keep the doors open, so they can keep building fine acoustic grand pianos.

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#2149036 - 09/12/13 08:53 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: StarvingLion]
LesCharles73 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/24/07
Posts: 739
Loc: Denton Texas
Originally Posted By: StarvingLion
To compensate, the digital fans will be like a plague of locusts attempting to convert the "unwashed" (acoustic owners) that their technology is superior. It will happen, and you can't say I didn't warn you.


Yep, that's the agenda alright. You nailed it and our cover is blown. Oh darn. wink



Edited by LesCharles73 (09/12/13 11:37 PM)
_________________________
Les C Deal





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#2149083 - 09/12/13 10:36 PM Re: Did you expect this? [Re: The Monkeys]
StarvingLion Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/30/13
Posts: 226
I cannot fathom why the apathetic acoustic pianists here put up with this digital fake piano madness. The synthetic sounds of the Roland V-Piano don't even come from a real piano. And, yet, almost all fanboys tell us that the future of digital pianos is physical modeling (aka fake pianos) that is implemented in the V-Piano.
_________________________
I'm starting the solid wooden keys revolution in digital pianos. Get'em now or be square!

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