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#2175747 - 11/02/13 01:48 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1212
Loc: Cleveland, OH
(Too ambitious? I may end up regretting this.)
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXIV

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#2175804 - 11/02/13 08:26 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
Morodiene Offline
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Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11935
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
(Too ambitious? I may end up regretting this.)
You have lots of time! Take it slow and be methodical in your approach. If you never push yourself, you won't ever know what you can accomplish! smile
_________________________
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#2175933 - 11/02/13 02:36 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
tangleweeds Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012


Registered: 12/21/08
Posts: 1269
Loc: Portlandia
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
(Too ambitious? I may end up regretting this.)

I'm feeling a bit of this too. But I'm taking Morodiene's words to heart also.

OTOH, if there's anyone out there who loves Op.39 no.22 The Lark as much as I do, but is more confident of their ability to pull it off, just let me know. I'll happily cede to anyone more competent than myself.

... but if no-one else wants it, I feel really good about it as a challenge piece.
_________________________
Oops... extremely distracted by mandolins at the moment... brb

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#2175955 - 11/02/13 03:54 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
peterws Online   content
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Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3619
Loc: Northern England.
I wish mine was half the length. 3 min is toooo long . . .I only have a half mb memory . . .and it`s already stretched to it`s max on the Joplin thingy . .
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes — but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

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#2176040 - 11/02/13 06:47 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
rnaple Offline

Silver Supporter until April 24 2014


Registered: 12/23/10
Posts: 2098
Loc: Rocky Mountains
I'm wondering. How can you have a Tchaikovsky Recital without the 1812 Overture?
Does somebody have something against playing with cannons? HHHHhhhhuuuuummmmm? smile
_________________________
Ron
Your brain is a sponge. Keep it wet. Mary Gae George
The focus of your personal practice is discipline. Not numbers. Scott Sonnon

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#2176042 - 11/02/13 06:50 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
AZ_Astro Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/19/12
Posts: 462
Loc: Tempe, Arizona
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
(Too ambitious? I may end up regretting this.)


I just listened to a Youtube recording of the Berceuse piece in Opus 72.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A7_ZbbKlj8

... and I read along with the score. Looked challenging for me (early intermediate) but depending on your level, it might be very manageable.

But what a delightful piece that will give you great joy! I was quite taken with its charm and I think it is well worth the effort.
_________________________
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#2176138 - 11/02/13 08:41 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: AZ_Astro]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1212
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By: AZ_Astro
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
(Too ambitious? I may end up regretting this.)


I just listened to a Youtube recording of the Berceuse piece in Opus 72.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A7_ZbbKlj8

... and I read along with the score. Looked challenging for me (early intermediate) but depending on your level, it might be very manageable.

But what a delightful piece that will give you great joy! I was quite taken with its charm and I think it is well worth the effort.
I wasn't sure I wanted to participate in this recital, because I'm not familiar with Tchaikovsky's piano music, and I couldn't find a piece on the list that really appealed until I got to Op. 72. This one I thought especially charming. I think it should be okay for my level (although there's an 8-measure sections of triplets that could be trouble!), but I'm just worried that I'm taking on a few too many pieces: one for the Joplin recital, the usual ABF quarterly recitals, this one, and then another very special piece that I'm going to start learning soon.
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXIV

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#2176148 - 11/02/13 08:58 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: rnaple]
jotur Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 5532
Loc: Santa Fe, NM
Originally Posted By: rnaple
I'm wondering. How can you have a Tchaikovsky Recital without the 1812 Overture?
Does somebody have something against playing with cannons? HHHHhhhhuuuuummmmm? smile


Or even a loose cannon? smile

Cathy
_________________________

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#2177286 - 11/05/13 12:42 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
AZ_Astro Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/19/12
Posts: 462
Loc: Tempe, Arizona
I am so pleased that I joined this Tchaikovsky recital. Maybe I like the Russian style? But I am finding that the Opus 39 pieces (Album for the Young) to be quite delightful and there are five or six pieces in there that I would enjoy knowing. The French Song looks almost sight-readable! (I'm sure it is, for those with the knack!)

The Grieg recital was also very rewarding to participate in and I adored many of those pieces as well.

AZ
_________________________
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#2178125 - 11/06/13 06:01 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
peterws Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3619
Loc: Northern England.
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
Originally Posted By: AZ_Astro
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
(Too ambitious? I may end up regretting this.)


I just listened to a Youtube recording of the Berceuse piece in Opus 72.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A7_ZbbKlj8

... and I read along with the score. Looked challenging for me (early intermediate) but depending on your level, it might be very manageable.

But what a delightful piece that will give you great joy! I was quite taken with its charm and I think it is well worth the effort.
I wasn't sure I wanted to participate in this recital, because I'm not familiar with Tchaikovsky's piano music, and I couldn't find a piece on the list that really appealed until I got to Op. 72. This one I thought especially charming. I think it should be okay for my level (although there's an 8-measure sections of triplets that could be trouble!), but I'm just worried that I'm taking on a few too many pieces: one for the Joplin recital, the usual ABF quarterly recitals, this one, and then another very special piece that I'm going to start learning soon.


That`s a great piece. I never had time to try `em before grabbing one I liked or I`d`ve had that!
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes — but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

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#2178127 - 11/06/13 06:03 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
peterws Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3619
Loc: Northern England.
Anybody other than me chord this stuff to assist the "flow" of the learning process?
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes — but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

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#2178217 - 11/06/13 09:50 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: peterws]
tangleweeds Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012


Registered: 12/21/08
Posts: 1269
Loc: Portlandia
Originally Posted By: peterws
Anybody other than me chord this stuff to assist the "flow" of the learning process?

I colored my score.
_________________________
Oops... extremely distracted by mandolins at the moment... brb

neglected piano blog

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#2178251 - 11/06/13 11:45 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: peterws]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1212
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By: peterws
Anybody other than me chord this stuff to assist the "flow" of the learning process?
What do you mean by "chord" it?
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXIV

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#2178271 - 11/07/13 01:32 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
peterws Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3619
Loc: Northern England.
You can pick out the chords in the music and write`em down. Mine`s written in Bflat. But many others come into play. Augmented, diminished, it all helps me to join up the left and right hands a tad faster! Like a busker`s sheet.
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes — but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

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#2178280 - 11/07/13 02:23 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: peterws]
Bobpickle Offline

Gold Supporter until July 10  2014


Registered: 05/24/12
Posts: 1383
Loc: Cameron Park, California
Originally Posted By: peterws
Anybody other than me chord this stuff to assist the "flow" of the learning process?


Yeah, I like doing this and then also memorizing the progressions. By analyzing the harmonic structures and progressions, you'll have a greater understanding of the music, an easier time memorizing it, and a more secure memorization once done.

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#2178750 - 11/07/13 09:56 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
Morodiene Offline
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Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11935
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I don't chord it, but I do practice just playing the block chords when it's a tricky spot. I also don't make such nice colors on mine! Tangleweeds, what do all the colors mean?

So I've been also working on the rest of Op. 2 in case I actually get to do it. I've noticed that in all 3 of the pieces, Tchaikovsky (can we just call him the Tchai-man?) used hemiolas and figures that cross over bar-lines and obscure the time signature. Anyone else encounter these?

I've also noticed he likes to state something and repeat it twice, then move on to another idea, and repeat.
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#2178756 - 11/07/13 10:01 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: tangleweeds]
Polyphonist Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7605
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: tangleweeds
Originally Posted By: peterws
Anybody other than me chord this stuff to assist the "flow" of the learning process?

I colored my score.


How in the world do you read that? laugh What does it all mean?
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Polyphonist

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#2178783 - 11/07/13 11:02 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
tangleweeds Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012


Registered: 12/21/08
Posts: 1269
Loc: Portlandia
The coloring is mostly to highlight the tonic and dominant in the main key, and relative minor. So the main key is G major = green, dominant = D = orange; then shift to relative minor, E minor = blue, dominant = B = purple. I also marked the grace note whatchacallems with slashes of magenta, made the 8va parts radioactive lemon, and what else? traced out clef changes and dynamic markings...

It's kind of a game of highlighting, marking and/or detailing out anything and everything of possible interest or significance, as a way of making explicit in my mind all of the details I might possibly need to remember.

When I went back to university in my 30s (I'm quite a bit older now), I got tested for learning styles, and I'm visual/kinesthetic. One of my study tricks was getting all kinesthetic (notes/lists/outlines in the margins, plus multi-color highlighting) on my visual text (or in this case score). At school I would kind of squint at my multicolor-highlighted textbooks and quiz myself to fill in the info on the basis of my defacements. I got all As, so maybe it worked.

So now I'm kinda doing the same thing with this score, as I use it to follow along with the various professional recordings I've found of my piece on iTunes.

It's all part of an elaborate plot to keep tension out of my hands (and entire being) when I'm at the piano. I've realized that a huge amount of the time I tense up, it's because I'm not entirely certain what's happening next. So I'm trying to be entirely certain about what the score says, so as to stay more relaxed at the piano.



Edited by tangleweeds (11/07/13 11:03 PM)
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#2179243 - 11/08/13 05:12 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: peterws]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1212
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By: peterws
You can pick out the chords in the music and write`em down. Mine`s written in Bflat. But many others come into play. Augmented, diminished, it all helps me to join up the left and right hands a tad faster! Like a busker`s sheet.
Oh, yes, I do that too. My teacher had me start doing that some time ago, and it actually helps me a bit with memorization too. Because instead of having to remember 5 notes, for instance, I just remember the chord.
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXIV

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#2179345 - 11/08/13 08:34 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: MaryBee]
Sam S Offline
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Registered: 12/12/07
Posts: 1415
Loc: Georgia, USA
I've got Schubert's op 90/3 on the backburner. If you've never heard it, it's got a top melody, a bass line, and tons of chord notes in the middle. I actually wrote out the whole thing as block chords so I could learn it that way. I play the block chords for a few measures, then switch to the music for the same passage.

It's too soon to tell if it's really helping though! So far I've been disappointed - I thought it would be a magic spell that would give me a big breakthrough - nope.

Sam

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#2179443 - 11/09/13 04:52 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: Sam S]
peterws Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3619
Loc: Northern England.
Writing the chords on the score helps mainly (I think) to identify the notes` order. Like, a B flat chord can come in 3 inversions, anywhere up or down the keyboard. The music identifies the inversion and positioning of the chord.

I know, it`s not as easy as I make it sound. But it does help quite a lot in learning and retaining! There are however, always those chords which defy description!*&%^!! We shall say nowt about them.
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes — but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

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#2180258 - 11/10/13 06:43 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2375
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: peterws
There are however, always those chords which defy description!
Despite their ability to avoid being named they are fairly unique and, certainly for me, their uniqueness makes them stand out and be more memorable.

I always analyse my music before starting but it begins mostly with a structural analysis to find repeated patterns and phrases or anything that might stand out. The harmonic analysis doesn't begin until I'm actually working one phrase at a time, fingering, phrasing, dynamics and all. It's only near the end, when all or most of the phrases have been learnt or when I start to put phrases together that I look at the overall harmonic progress through the piece. I tend to memorise better from a melodic or thematic analysis than harmonic.
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#2180373 - 11/10/13 09:56 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1212
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
Originally Posted By: peterws
There are however, always those chords which defy description!
Despite their ability to avoid being named they are fairly unique and, certainly for me, their uniqueness makes them stand out and be more memorable.
"The chord that must not be named." That sounds a little scary. laugh
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXIV

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#2180486 - 11/11/13 05:54 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: wayne33yrs]
Anne H Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/02/13
Posts: 116
I'll take a stab at the lovely Berceuse - I've never tried any of his piano music that wasn't in the Classics to Moderns books! It sounds like it will be a nice piece to move into spring with.

The Tchaikovsky Themed Recital is due to take place April 15.
To preserve existing selections, always QUOTE from the latest list then, in any order:

-- Delete the initial "[quote=<name> ]"
-- Delete the final "[/quote ]"
-- Add your name and the bold tags, "[b ]" and "[/b ]", around your chosen piece.

Then submit the new list.

A 30sec clip is available of each piece in the same order as below @ http://www.deezer.com/en/album/4725421 (If you sign up or in with FB, the whole pieces can be played for free)
Or here, if you're restricted from the above due to your location:
http://www.allmusic.com/album/tchaikovsky-complete-piano-works-mw0001360556

Op. 1 No. 1. Scherzo a la russe
Op. 1 No. 2. Impromptu

Op. 2 No. 1. Ruines d'un chateau (Morodiene)
Op. 2 No. 2. Scherzo
Op. 2 No. 3. Chant sans paroles

Op. 4 Valse caprice in D major
Op. 5 Romance in F minor (Ganddalf)
Op. 7 Valse-scherzo No. 1 in A major
Op. 8 Capriccio in G flat major

Op. 9 No. 1. Reverie
Op. 9 No. 2. Polka de salon
Op. 9 No. 3. Mazurka de salon

Op. 10 No. 1. Nocturne in F major (Valencia)
Op. 10 No. 2. Humoresque in E minor

Op. 19 No. 1. Reverie du soir (Dipsy)
Op. 19 No. 2. Scherzo humoristique
Op. 19 No. 3. Feuillet d'album (zrtf90)
Op. 19 No. 4. Nocturne (Rupak Bhattacharya)
Op. 19 No. 5. Capriccioso
Op. 19 No. 6. Theme originale et variations

Op. 21 No. 1. Prelude in B major
Op. 21 No. 2. Fugue a 4 voix in G sharp minor
Op. 21 No. 3. Impromptu in C sharp minor
Op. 21 No. 4. Marche funebre in A flat minor
Op. 21 No. 5. Mazurque in A flat minor
Op. 21 No. 6. Scherzo in A flat major

Op. 37 No. 1 January: By the Fireside (dynamobt)
Op. 37 No. 2 February: Carnival
Op. 37 No. 3 March: Song of the Lark (SwissMS)
Op. 37 No. 4 April: Snowdrop (Pavel.K)
Op. 37 No. 5 May: White Nights
Op. 37 No. 6 June: Barcarolle (Sam S)
Op. 37 No. 7 July: Song of the Reaper
Op. 37 No. 8 August: The Harvest (dire tonic)
Op. 37 No. 9 September: The Hunt
Op. 37 No. 10 October: Autumn Song (Andy Platt)
Op. 37 No. 11 November: Troika
Op. 37 No. 12 December: Christmas (carlos88)

Op. 39 No. 1. Morning Prayer (casinitaly)
Op. 39 No. 2. Winter Morning
Op. 39 No. 3. Mamma
Op. 39 No. 4. Hobbyhorse
Op. 39 No. 5. The Toy Soldiers' March
Op. 39 No. 6. The New Doll (ClsscLib)
Op. 39 No. 7. The Sick Doll (earlofmar)
Op. 39 No. 8. The Doll's Funeral
Op. 39 No. 9. Waltz
Op. 39 No. 10. Polka
Op. 39 No. 11. Mazurka
Op. 39 No. 12. Russian Song
Op. 39 No. 13. Peasant Prelude
Op. 39 No. 14. Popular Song
Op. 39 No. 15. Italian Song (sinophilia)
Op. 39 No. 16. Old French Song (Recaredo)
Op. 39 No. 17. German Song
Op. 39 No. 18. Neapolitan Song (IreneAdler)
Op. 39 No. 19. A Nursery Tale
Op. 39 No. 20. The Witch Baba Yaga
Op. 39 No. 21. Sweet Dreams (AimeeO)
Op. 39 No. 22. The Lark (tangleweeds)
Op. 39 No. 23. At Church (AZ_Astro)
Op. 39 No. 24. The Organ-Grinder's Song

Op. 40 No. 1. Etude
Op. 40 No. 2. Chanson triste
Op. 40 No. 3. Marche funebre
Op. 40 No. 4. Mazurka in C major
Op. 40 No. 5. Mazurka in D major
Op. 40 No. 6. Chant sans paroles
Op. 40 No. 7. Au village
Op. 40 No. 8. Valse in A flat major
Op. 40 No. 9. Valse in F sharp minor (PikaPianist)
Op. 40 No. 10. Danse russe
Op. 40 No. 11. Scherzo
Op. 40 No. 12. Reverie interrompue

Op. 51 No. 1. Valse de salon
Op. 51 No. 2. Polka peu dansante
Op. 51 No. 3. Menuetto scherzoso
Op. 51 No. 4. Natha-valse
Op. 51 No. 5. Romance
Op. 51 No. 6. Valse sentimentale (lyricmudra)

Op. 72 No. 1. Impromptu Prostnikova (Peterws)
Op. 72 No. 2. Berceuse (Anne H)
Op. 72 No. 3. Tendres reproches
Op. 72 No. 4. Danse caracteristique
Op. 72 No. 5. Meditation
Op. 72 No. 6. Mazurka pour danser
Op. 72 No. 7. Polacca de concert
Op. 72 No. 8. Dialogue
Op. 72 No. 9. Un poco di Schumann (Wayne32yrs)
Op. 72 No. 10. Scherzo-fantaisie
Op. 72 No. 11. Valse bluette
Op. 72 No. 12. L'espiegle
Op. 72 No. 13. Echo rustique
Op. 72 No. 14. Chant elegiaque
Op. 72 No. 15. Un poco di Chopin
Op. 72 No. 16. Valse a cinq temps
Op. 72 No. 17. Passe lointain
Op. 72 No. 18. Scene dansante: invitation au trepak
_________________________
Works in Progress:
Joplin - Binks' Waltz
Winston - Carol of the Bells
Bach Inventions
Einaudi - Berlin Song, Reverie

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#2180489 - 11/11/13 06:45 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
peterws Online   content
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3619
Loc: Northern England.
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
Originally Posted By: peterws
There are however, always those chords which defy description!
Despite their ability to avoid being named they are fairly unique and, certainly for me, their uniqueness makes them stand out and be more memorable.

I always analyse my music before starting but it begins mostly with a structural analysis to find repeated patterns and phrases or anything that might stand out. The harmonic analysis doesn't begin until I'm actually working one phrase at a time, fingering, phrasing, dynamics and all. It's only near the end, when all or most of the phrases have been learnt or when I start to put phrases together that I look at the overall harmonic progress through the piece. I tend to memorise better from a melodic or thematic analysis than harmonic.


I think I`m going to have to change my tactic. My usual method isn`t working, I`m still on p1 and likely to remain so in the forseeable future ,. . . .Guess I better break it down to a couple o` bars at a time. I`m not going to get a feel for the whole page. Just not gonna happen. . . see what another week brings.
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes — but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

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#2180515 - 11/11/13 08:33 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
Polyphonist Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7605
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
Originally Posted By: peterws
There are however, always those chords which defy description!
Despite their ability to avoid being named they are fairly unique and, certainly for me, their uniqueness makes them stand out and be more memorable.

Which chords are these? I have yet to see a chord that can't be named.
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

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#2180541 - 11/11/13 09:43 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2375
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Unfortunately, AnneH, Marybee has already taken the Berceuse. The list you used was rather out of date and missing several selections.


The Tchaikovsky Themed Recital is due to take place April 15.

To preserve existing selections, always QUOTE from the latest list then, in any order:

-- Delete the initial "[quote=<name> ]"
-- Delete the final "[/quote ]"
-- Add your name and the bold tags, "[b ]" and "[/b ]", around your chosen piece.

Then submit the new list.


Op. 1 No. 1. Scherzo a la russe
Op. 1 No. 2. Impromptu

Op. 2 No. 1. Ruines d'un chateau (Morodiene)
Op. 2 No. 2. Scherzo
Op. 2 No. 3. Chant sans paroles

Op. 4 Valse caprice in D major
Op. 5 Romance in F minor (Ganddalf)
Op. 7 Valse-scherzo No. 1 in A major
Op. 8 Capriccio in G flat major

Op. 9 No. 1. Reverie
Op. 9 No. 2. Polka de salon
Op. 9 No. 3. Mazurka de salon

Op. 10 No. 1. Nocturne in F major (Valencia)
Op. 10 No. 2. Humoresque in E minor

Op. 19 No. 1. Reverie du soir (Dipsy)
Op. 19 No. 2. Scherzo humoristique
Op. 19 No. 3. Feuillet d'album (zrtf90)
Op. 19 No. 4. Nocturne (Rupak Bhattacharya)
Op. 19 No. 5. Capriccioso
Op. 19 No. 6. Theme originale et variations

Op. 21 No. 1. Prelude in B major
Op. 21 No. 2. Fugue a 4 voix in G sharp minor
Op. 21 No. 3. Impromptu in C sharp minor
Op. 21 No. 4. Marche funebre in A flat minor
Op. 21 No. 5. Mazurque in A flat minor
Op. 21 No. 6. Scherzo in A flat major

Op. 37 No. 1 January: By the Fireside (dynamobt)
Op. 37 No. 2 February: Carnival
Op. 37 No. 3 March: Song of the Lark (SwissMS)
Op. 37 No. 4 April: Snowdrop (Pavel.K)
Op. 37 No. 5 May: White Nights
Op. 37 No. 6 June: Barcarolle (Sam S)
Op. 37 No. 7 July: Song of the Reaper
Op. 37 No. 8 August: The Harvest (dire tonic)
Op. 37 No. 9 September: The Hunt
Op. 37 No. 10 October: Autumn Song (Andy Platt)
Op. 37 No. 11 November: Troika
Op. 37 No. 12 December: Christmas (carlos88)

Op. 39 No. 1. Morning Prayer (casinitaly)
Op. 39 No. 2. Winter Morning
Op. 39 No. 3. Mamma
Op. 39 No. 4. Hobbyhorse
Op. 39 No. 5. The Toy Soldiers' March
Op. 39 No. 6. The New Doll (ClsscLib)
Op. 39 No. 7. The Sick Doll (earlofmar)
Op. 39 No. 8. The Doll's Funeral
Op. 39 No. 9. Waltz
Op. 39 No. 10. Polka
Op. 39 No. 11. Mazurka (MrPozor)
Op. 39 No. 12. Russian Song (Johnny D)
Op. 39 No. 13. Peasant Prelude
Op. 39 No. 14. Popular Song
Op. 39 No. 15. Italian Song (sinophilia)
Op. 39 No. 16. Old French Song (Recaredo)
Op. 39 No. 17. German Song (sydnal)
Op. 39 No. 18. Neapolitan Song (IreneAdler)
Op. 39 No. 19. A Nursery Tale
Op. 39 No. 20. The Witch Baba Yaga
Op. 39 No. 21. Sweet Dreams (AimeeO)
Op. 39 No. 22. The Lark (tangleweeds)
Op. 39 No. 23. At Church (AZ_Astro)
Op. 39 No. 24. The Organ-Grinder's Song

Op. 40 No. 1. Etude
Op. 40 No. 2. Chanson triste (Greener)
Op. 40 No. 3. Marche funebre
Op. 40 No. 4. Mazurka in C major
Op. 40 No. 5. Mazurka in D major
Op. 40 No. 6. Chant sans paroles
Op. 40 No. 7. Au village
Op. 40 No. 8. Valse in A flat major
Op. 40 No. 9. Valse in F sharp minor (PikaPianist)
Op. 40 No. 10. Danse russe
Op. 40 No. 11. Scherzo
Op. 40 No. 12. Reverie interrompue

Op. 51 No. 1. Valse de salon
Op. 51 No. 2. Polka peu dansante
Op. 51 No. 3. Menuetto scherzoso
Op. 51 No. 4. Natha-valse
Op. 51 No. 5. Romance
Op. 51 No. 6. Valse sentimentale (lyricmudra)

Op. 72 No. 1. Impromptu Prostnikova (Peterws)
Op. 72 No. 2. Berceuse (MaryBee)
Op. 72 No. 3. Tendres reproches
Op. 72 No. 4. Danse caracteristique
Op. 72 No. 5. Meditation
Op. 72 No. 6. Mazurka pour danser
Op. 72 No. 7. Polacca de concert
Op. 72 No. 8. Dialogue
Op. 72 No. 9. Un poco di Schumann (Wayne32yrs)
Op. 72 No. 10. Scherzo-fantaisie
Op. 72 No. 11. Valse bluette
Op. 72 No. 12. L'espiegle
Op. 72 No. 13. Echo rustique
Op. 72 No. 14. Chant elegiaque
Op. 72 No. 15. Un poco di Chopin
Op. 72 No. 16. Valse a cinq temps
Op. 72 No. 17. Passe lointain
Op. 72 No. 18. Scene dansante: invitation au trepak
_________________________
Richard

Top
#2180547 - 11/11/13 09:49 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: Polyphonist]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2375
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
Originally Posted By: peterws
There are however, always those chords which defy description!
Despite their ability to avoid being named they are fairly unique and, certainly for me, their uniqueness makes them stand out and be more memorable.

Which chords are these? I have yet to see a chord that can't be named.


Don't be so pedantic, PP.

We're just talking about chords that don't fall readily under a particular umbrella. E.g. M23 in Bach's Prelude, BWV 846. Either the B or C could be the non-essential note and the chord could be an Ab dim7 or Dm7b5 chord.
_________________________
Richard

Top
#2180577 - 11/11/13 10:56 AM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1212
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
Unfortunately, AnneH, Marybee has already taken the Berceuse. The list you used was rather out of date and missing several selections.
Oh, thanks zrtf! I was a little worried that my selection had got lost. And I'm already working through the first page. Sorry, AnneH. (But you might look at Op.72, No.5 (Meditation), or No.8 (Dialog). They're really beautiful too.)
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXIV

Top
#2180679 - 11/11/13 03:35 PM Re: Tchaikovsky Themed Recital: April 2014 [Re: zrtf90]
Greener Offline

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014


Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1203
Loc: Toronto
I've just downloaded the score for the Chason Triste and delighted to see it is only 2 pages.

In listening to a few from the list, I was immediately attracted to this one. Eventually I will want to do a nice production of it. Proof will be in the pudding, as they say, in how far along I get with this in preparation for the recital.

I could be wrong, but think this will be easier than my Joplin choice. Both will be a challenge though and I've been slow off the mark. Time to get movin ...
_________________________

Top
Page 4 of 13 < 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 12 13 >

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