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#2182648 - 11/15/13 05:03 AM Bad Teachers
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5458
Loc: Orange County, CA
That's right, bad teachers. I'm talking to you. You know who you are. Get out of the profession! Stop ruining these poor kids.

I recently (and very suddenly!) acquired many transfer students. While a few of them are pretty good, most are just plain awful. I feel like I'm the magnet for transfer wrecks.

Here are some of the things I've noticed in the last three weeks:

1) One teacher did not use any method books. The student was taught by random sheets of photocopies and some generic repertoire book plus Czerny. There are giant, gaping holes in the student's pianistic ability and musical knowledge. And the student already started CM. Hello!?

2) One teacher had her student use the theory book that came with the method books. Great! But there are some skipped pages, and many wrong answers going uncorrected. Not only did learning not take place, the student had wrong information uploaded into his brain, which I now have the unpleasant job of deprogramming.

3) One Suzuki teacher (yep, join the crowd already!!) decided it was okay to skip around the Suzuki books, picking and choosing only the "fun" pieces to teach, while writing out all the finger numbers and letting the student learn via the "copy me" method. The student can't read bass clef and barely knows the C-position in treble clef. And the student knows absolutely NOTHING about theory.

4) One student who is already out of method books has no concept of fingering and wants to play everything at 100 mph. But I somehow fixed both problems in two lessons. The kid is quite bright, and picks up things quickly. It just takes a bit of insistence for correctness from the teacher to fix these simple problems!

5) Just because a teacher has a "full studio" and a "waiting list" does not mean the teacher is good. In fact, a teacher who has her attention spread 60 different directions is probably not the most effective teacher at any given moment. Think about it.

I've seen bad teaching over the years, but if this recent wave of transfer students is any indication, the current state of piano teaching is one of gross incompetence.

Parents: Can you be more careful when choosing your kid's first piano teacher? Even if you just want your kid to "have fun," at least let them learn something correctly the first time instead of hiring a more qualified teacher later to UNDO the months or even years of incorrect, incompetent instruction.


Ugh! mad

------

{rant mode off}
_________________________
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#2182658 - 11/15/13 06:20 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
pianomouse Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/17/12
Posts: 88
Loc: Europe
I feel with you!

I'm getting transfer students every year and I know exactly what you're talking about.
Presently, I'm dealing with a 16-year-old student who certainly has talent, but hasn't seen one method book or any structure in his piano career. He's very stubborn, as he's used to having control over his lessons. Till now, he has chosen the pieces - and why does he suddenly have to play with fingerings when it's always worked out just right? Hey, and why does he have to change his hand technique, Horowitz also played with straight fingers........

This is just a sample of the discussions I've gone through with him since summer. Funny, isn't it? So tiring.
_________________________
The piano keys are black and white,
But they sound like a million colours in your mind.
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#2182677 - 11/15/13 07:41 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Morodiene Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11756
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I feel you! It's better if the student doesn't have any teacher at all than a bad one, but I don't think parents realize that. They think, "Something is better than nothing." and go with whomever is most convenient or affordable without taking the time to find out if they are any good. Then when they finally come to you, they heap upon expectations for their child to audition for thins or compete, and they have no clue how far away they are from that point due to the bad teaching. They just think, "they've studied piano for 4 years now, they should be good!" And of course, the previous teachers don't instill good practice habits, so the kids don't ever practice or if they do, it's running through the pieces from start to finish 2-3 times in a row. *sigh*
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#2182707 - 11/15/13 09:44 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Alan Lai Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/16/13
Posts: 309
Loc: USA/Hong Kong
I don't think #1 is a bad thing, provided the teacher is well equipped, knowledgeable, and experienced.

So back to your point, bad teacher, which I agree wholeheartedly.

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#2182715 - 11/15/13 09:57 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
catpiano Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/20/12
Posts: 55
I have 2 transfer students, siblings, who I have been teaching for 1.5 years. Before me they had another teacher for a year or so. The previous teacher had rushed them through the primer through level 2 books of I think Alfred's lesson books, maybe it was Bastien? I asked them each to play something from the book and they could only do the right hand. Yep, the teacher had ONLY taught the right hand through the level 2 book! They had never used their left hands! SO infuriating. And, the teacher jumped around and let them choose pieces they liked. A whole chunk of their books was skipped.

Though the number one thing I can't stand is getting transfer students who weren't taught to read, and have all the finger numbers or note names written in to the music. I got one this year who was halfway through Faber's level 1 and can't read music at all. She was taught just by rote/using finger numbers.

I hate these situations because in every case, I have to take the student back almost to the beginning. The student becomes frustrated with having to play music that is much easier than their last teacher assigned, even though they're not playing that music properly.

I agree, there are so many bad teachers out there.


Edited by catpiano (11/15/13 09:58 AM)

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#2182724 - 11/15/13 10:10 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
red-rose Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/20/13
Posts: 177
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Ugh. I totally sympathize. Having moved cities a couple years ago, I started out with completely new students, and of the ones who had already been taking piano, I would say about 70% of them had a similar experience to what you are describing with a "bad teacher." Thankfully, I started the last batch of them about 4 months ago, and I think we are starting to really get over the hump of most of these issues! :-D

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#2182731 - 11/15/13 10:32 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: red-rose]
Barb860 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/09
Posts: 1646
Loc: northern California
So the elephant in the room question is:

How do you deal with these transfer students who've had poor instruction?
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#2182778 - 11/15/13 11:57 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Polyphonist Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7573
Loc: New York City
Why do you accept these students?
_________________________
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Polyphonist

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#2182788 - 11/15/13 12:05 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
ezpiano.org Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/10/11
Posts: 1002
Loc: Irvine, CA
Do you mind share if these teachers are member of MTAC or not?
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#2182847 - 11/15/13 01:59 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Polyphonist]
red-rose Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/20/13
Posts: 177
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Why do we accept any piano student?
along with the fact that it's our source of income... wouldn't it be quite unfortunate if no "good" teacher ever accepted students who had previously learned bad habits from another teacher? Those unlucky students... It's not their fault! In addition to needing the income, I don't mind working at it as a challenge and an opportunity to HELP these students overcome their weaknesses and bad habits. Isn't that why we're all teachers to begin with? (Plus not everyone is lucky enough to have a waiting list of "perfect" students... I actually find that question rather condescending. Lucky you if you've always been able to turn away every single less-than-perfect student!)

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#2182886 - 11/15/13 02:59 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Ben Crosland Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/11/10
Posts: 419
Loc: Worcester, UK
I'm afraid you'll just be preaching to the converted on this forum wink

I've had a run of these recently, too - really appalling teaching, and lovely students that are more than willing to adjust to my requirements.

I just can't understand why these teachers continue to do what they do - I mean, why would anyone want to listen to playing that bad, day after day? Some of these teachers have been going for decades, too.

Regarding student numbers: that's no excuse. At all. It's a simple matter of caring about what you do.
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#2182895 - 11/15/13 03:17 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Ben Crosland]
Joyce_dup1 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/01/02
Posts: 191
Loc: Chicago
Just out of curiosity, what if each of you brings to mind your worst student at this moment. How long have you been teaching that student? What is the greatest problem with that student's current abilities? What have you been doing to address this problem? what has worked and what has not worked? And why do you think that is so? And finally, what do you hope to do to change this situation as your next plan of action for this student.

I think it would be enlightening to discuss the problem in this way because I suspect we all have such students.

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#2182906 - 11/15/13 03:50 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Michael_99 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/12
Posts: 935
Loc: Canada Alberta
AZNpiano, I have read your post, here:

subject: Bad Teachers

That's right, bad teachers. I'm talking to you. You know who you are. Get out of the profession! Stop ruining these poor kids.

I recently (and very suddenly!) acquired many transfer students. While a few of them are pretty good, most are just plain awful. I feel like I'm the magnet for transfer wrecks.

Here are some of the things I've noticed in the last three weeks:

1) One teacher did not use any method books. The student was taught by random sheets of photocopies and some generic repertoire book plus Czerny. There are giant, gaping holes in the student's pianistic ability and musical knowledge. And the student already started CM. Hello!?

2) One teacher had her student use the theory book that came with the method books. Great! But there are some skipped pages, and many wrong answers going uncorrected. Not only did learning not take place, the student had wrong information uploaded into his brain, which I now have the unpleasant job of deprogramming.

3) One Suzuki teacher (yep, join the crowd already!!) decided it was okay to skip around the Suzuki books, picking and choosing only the "fun" pieces to teach, while writing out all the finger numbers and letting the student learn via the "copy me" method. The student can't read bass clef and barely knows the C-position in treble clef. And the student knows absolutely NOTHING about theory.

4) One student who is already out of method books has no concept of fingering and wants to play everything at 100 mph. But I somehow fixed both problems in two lessons. The kid is quite bright, and picks up things quickly. It just takes a bit of insistence for correctness from the teacher to fix these simple problems!

5) Just because a teacher has a "full studio" and a "waiting list" does not mean the teacher is good. In fact, a teacher who has her attention spread 60 different directions is probably not the most effective teacher at any given moment. Think about it.

I've seen bad teaching over the years, but if this recent wave of transfer students is any indication, the current state of piano teaching is one of gross incompetence.

Parents: Can you be more careful when choosing your kid's first piano teacher? Even if you just want your kid to "have fun," at least let them learn something correctly the first time instead of hiring a more qualified teacher later to UNDO the months or even years of incorrect, incompetent instruction.


Ugh! mad

------

{rant mode off}

_____

It would be impolite for me to comment on teachers/piano teachers, so I will use lawyers as an example.

When a person has a (legal) problem, and needs a lawyer's help, they have to look for a lawyer. But there are only 12 types(!) of lawyers: young, old, honest, dishonest, rich, poor, expensive, cheap, bright, less bright, women, men, - and how does anyone know how to find a lawyer of the type they want to use and pay to do their work. It is not easy even for people in the profession to be able to pick or find a lawyer to use. So finding a piano teacher for a "loved one" can be impossible at best - based on the limited funds of the parent and what the parent knows or doesn't know about piano teachers.

What I would do, if it was a lawyer I would to go the local university or law school and do some talking and asking lots of questions.

If I was looking for a piano teacher, I would do the same thing, go to a local university, music department and ask a lot of questions.

You see, in the world no matter what you are interested in, people in the industry won't often recommend someone, but if you have a polite conversation with them about a piano teacher, for example, they will say something like I would say, Great teacher, but since you have a son, or a daughter or whatever description you use of your kid, you simply say, well, there are lots of teachers, and you should find one that suits your child and maybe I can help you if you bring me a list of teachers you are considering. When they bring the list to me or you, you simply say, well I have heard that these teacher are quite good with kids like yours and are reasonably priced - if that was a issue. So the parents get to pick one of several teachers from a list that are awesome, but you are able to politely point them in the right direction, but conversely, if someone asks you about a teacher and they are not a nice, good or whatever parent, you wouldn't be in a position to recommend a teacher that would be given grief. So it works both ways.

cheers,

3N15BT

And, of course, I have heard that there are as many piano teachers as there are types of lawyers I have listed - but I don't know that as a fact!

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#2182920 - 11/15/13 04:08 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Polyphonist]
Gary D. Online   content
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/30/08
Posts: 4783
Loc: South Florida
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Do you ever think before you write?
_________________________
Piano Teacher

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#2182921 - 11/15/13 04:11 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Gary D.]
ezpiano.org Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/10/11
Posts: 1002
Loc: Irvine, CA
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Do you ever think before you write?


thumb
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Piano lessons in Irvine, CA
Watch the introduction video on YouTube
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#2182941 - 11/15/13 04:45 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Alan Lai]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5458
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Alan Lai
I don't think #1 is a bad thing, provided the teacher is well equipped, knowledgeable, and experienced.

Unfortunately, this is nothing new. I've had similar transfers before. Some teachers just think they "got it" and can teach out of random photocopies and get all the bases covered.

But why risk giving an incomplete piano education when there are so many good methods out there? It's not hard to pick one method and supplement with other books if necessary.

Most of the time it's because the cheap parents want to have photocopied books so they don't have to buy any method books. That, or the teacher is just grossly incompetent.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2182946 - 11/15/13 04:49 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Ben Crosland]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5458
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Ben Crosland
Regarding student numbers: that's no excuse. At all. It's a simple matter of caring about what you do.

But if you do honestly care about all 60 students (the number is just for example), at some point you're going to be thinking about some or all of the students. Maybe it's just me, but I can't imagine myself being pulled 60 different directions and still do a good job. It would literally consume me.

I don't have anywhere near 60 students, but even at my current pace I'm starting to notice that I need to focus better in order to stay sharp.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2182953 - 11/15/13 04:57 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Barb860]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5458
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By: Barb860
So the elephant in the room question is:

How do you deal with these transfer students who've had poor instruction?

Well, a lot depends on the parents, actually, and how willing are they to accept the fact that they've wasted $$$ for many months or years. One parent in particular is giving me the vibes that she would like me to move her kiddo along faster, even though kiddo obviously can't read.

Other parents are like: "Well, my daughter passed X level so she must be at X level musically. I have proof. See? Certificate! Indicating passage of level." At this point, I give that kid a level 1 piece that she can't even begin to sight read; she can't even find the correct position to begin with.

Some parents cope with the truth better than the others.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2182956 - 11/15/13 05:01 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Opus_Maximus Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/27/04
Posts: 1485
While I'll be the first to admit that the world is plagued by inferior and unqualified teachers (as well as idiotic and sadistic assholes), I think we DO have to keep in mind that there are usually many, many factors in play behind a deficient piano student, and I think a lot of times the student, or other contributing factors could have just as much to do with it as the teacher.

Going off of what Joyce said a few posts above, let us all think of our worst students. I'm sure that if they suddenly switched teachers (or, even worse, took a 5 month break then went back to a new teacher), we would be completely embarrassed and ashamed of the impression that student would make on us, but it was out of out control. (After all, the very concept of a "transfer" student implies that something on the other end - of either a personal of logistical nature - was not working out in the first place).

Just yesterday, the mom of one of my highest-paying students (of over a year) called me and said "We really appreciate that you're trying to get him to read music and teaching him technique, but he really just wants to have fun and move his fingers. We'd appreciate it if you could just chill with him instead". The customer has spoken my friends. So let's say this kid goes to a new teacher in 5 months..obviously they will think I have taught him nothing, when in reality I tried to do everything. I have another student (also one of the highest paying), who I don't' bother to teacher correct technique to, because we've been working sitting on her couch on an unweighted 3 octave keyboard for the past year. Then you have situations where parents only want a 30 minute lessons when their level/ability clearly denotes more is needed. Then you have situations where students take 2 or 3 months off. Then you have students who don't touch the instrument between lessons. Then of course there are some students who, no matter how good the teaching or motivation, just can't really get anything to gel.

So my point is there are really too many factors at play to judge the quality of previous teaching, in my opinion.



Edited by Opus_Maximus (11/15/13 05:03 PM)

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#2183017 - 11/15/13 06:34 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Gary D.]
Polyphonist Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7573
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Do you ever think before you write?

Actually, yes. I thought quite hard and couldn't come up with a reason to subject oneself to these types of students.
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

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#2183039 - 11/15/13 07:27 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Brinestone Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/06/10
Posts: 351
While I agree with Opus Maximus to some extent. I inherited a student who had no sense of rhythm, and I was appalled at her previous teacher for failing to teach her to count. After a year of trying strategy after strategy after strategy to get her to feel the beat . . . well, she still is struggling. One of the things I am best at is teaching counting, and I have broken some VERY bad habits in some of my students, but with her, I was just stumped. I wonder now how many things her previous teacher tried. I did improve her technique quite a bit, though. The point is, it's sometimes impossible to tell where the weaknesses our transfer students have originated, whether from the teacher or from the student.

At the same time, well, you can kind of tell. This particular student, and her brother, were both very, very good at reading music. They could play with beautiful dynamics, and they practiced like a dream. Whenever I asked them to improve something on a piece (except for the girl's counting, of course), they'd come back the next week with it fixed. It was clear after a while that their previous teacher had been good, if not perfect.

Not so with another transfer student. She had "taken lessons" for three years before taking a year off due to frustration and then wanting to begin again with me. In those three years, she appeared to have learned nothing. Apparently after her first lesson with me, she went home and raved to her mom about how much she learned! She was so excited! Within a few months she was reading music and counting and actually, you know, playing piano. The previous teacher had insisted that a child her age (7-9) didn't have a long enough attention span for 30 minute lessons, so she did 15 minute lessons, and the teacher wasn't sitting right at the piano for the whole lesson even then. And the mom said this teacher was more expensive than I was (I was just starting out and had low rates back then). Oy. Just thinking about that makes me hot under the collar still. How can someone like that even have the gall to call themselves a piano teacher?
_________________________
Piano teacher since 2008, member of NFMC

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#2183042 - 11/15/13 07:29 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Polyphonist]
Ben Crosland Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/11/10
Posts: 419
Loc: Worcester, UK
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Do you ever think before you write?

Actually, yes. I thought quite hard and couldn't come up with a reason to subject oneself to these types of students.


I think the point is, these aren't "types of students" at all. Such a label seems to lay the blame on them, rather than the previous teacher.

Certainly, the two I have acquired recently have responded really well to me so far, and I thoroughly enjoy teaching them. So, I would be more inclined to ask "Why wouldn't you accept these students?"
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#2183055 - 11/15/13 08:03 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Polyphonist]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11655
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Do you ever think before you write?

Actually, yes. I thought quite hard and couldn't come up with a reason to subject oneself to these types of students.


Let's define "type of student" to make sure we're on the same page. A student takes lessons, listens attentively, and diligently practices what he is told. All the time this student is being mistaught, and this misteaching causes problems. Finally this attentive, diligent student goes to another teacher, having these problems which were caused by the first teacher. Your opinion is that this student should be rejected by good teachers, and never have a chance to improve. That student would be forced to try to fix his own problems which were caused by the poor teaching..... without having the ability to do so because of the results of the misteaching. Any student who was mistaught is condemned forever.

That is what you are saying. Did you think about this? Did you understand that this is what we are talking about? Or are you simply thinking of a student who plays badly because he has a poor attitude, "doesn't have it in him" or something like that?

There are people right in this forum whom you would condemn to not getting good instruction, because of the kind of instruction that they first received through no fault of their own.


Edited by keystring (11/15/13 08:54 PM)

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#2183122 - 11/15/13 11:06 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Polyphonist]
Barb860 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/09
Posts: 1646
Loc: northern California
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?

Do you ever think before you write?

Actually, yes. I thought quite hard and couldn't come up with a reason to subject oneself to these types of students.


You have a point here, for sure. These types of transfer students can be VERY difficult to deal with. It's tough. Easier to not take them, but some of us need the money, it's just the way it is. Do any piano teachers have only ideal students???
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#2183125 - 11/15/13 11:14 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
nyke Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/17/13
Posts: 49
In retrospect some transfer students stay in method books too long and you always find them saying what hand position is this song in?
I think if you are a qualified teacher then you can teach with or without a method book. Also what one teacher thinks is important for a child to learn another teacher may not.
Just look at all of the options there are for schools: Montessori, public school, homeschool etc. Many children are raised in different learning environments and also taught through different learning styles.
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#2183129 - 11/15/13 11:18 PM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Opus_Maximus]
Barb860 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/09
Posts: 1646
Loc: northern California
Originally Posted By: Opus_Maximus
While I'll be the first to admit that the world is plagued by inferior and unqualified teachers (as well as idiotic and sadistic assholes), I think we DO have to keep in mind that there are usually many, many factors in play behind a deficient piano student, and I think a lot of times the student, or other contributing factors could have just as much to do with it as the teacher.

Going off of what Joyce said a few posts above, let us all think of our worst students. I'm sure that if they suddenly switched teachers (or, even worse, took a 5 month break then went back to a new teacher), we would be completely embarrassed and ashamed of the impression that student would make on us, but it was out of out control. (After all, the very concept of a "transfer" student implies that something on the other end - of either a personal of logistical nature - was not working out in the first place).

Just yesterday, the mom of one of my highest-paying students (of over a year) called me and said "We really appreciate that you're trying to get him to read music and teaching him technique, but he really just wants to have fun and move his fingers. We'd appreciate it if you could just chill with him instead". The customer has spoken my friends. So let's say this kid goes to a new teacher in 5 months..obviously they will think I have taught him nothing, when in reality I tried to do everything. I have another student (also one of the highest paying), who I don't' bother to teacher correct technique to, because we've been working sitting on her couch on an unweighted 3 octave keyboard for the past year. Then you have situations where parents only want a 30 minute lessons when their level/ability clearly denotes more is needed. Then you have situations where students take 2 or 3 months off. Then you have students who don't touch the instrument between lessons. Then of course there are some students who, no matter how good the teaching or motivation, just can't really get anything to gel.

So my point is there are really too many factors at play to judge the quality of previous teaching, in my opinion.



Very interesting points here. FWIW I had a student transfer to me a few years ago. He was awful. I had to let him go after a few months of struggle. I learned that he studied with a very well-respected teacher in a neighboring community. She has a reputation of being a good teacher. This kid did not want to continue with piano lessons and was rebelling.
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#2183145 - 11/16/13 12:00 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Polyphonist]
Opus_Maximus Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/27/04
Posts: 1485
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?


Have you ever heard of money?

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#2183147 - 11/16/13 12:03 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: Opus_Maximus]
Polyphonist Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7573
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Opus_Maximus
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Why do you accept these students?


Have you ever heard of money?

Nope. What's that?

Yes, of course I have. What's your point?
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#2183150 - 11/16/13 12:21 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Opus_Maximus Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/27/04
Posts: 1485
You're a bit of an enigmatic poster, both here and on PC. I can't quite piece you together, or figure out what you do in life. That is not an insult, it's just how you come off to me here.

This forum is frequented mostly by those who have trained long and hard in the art of piano playing, and now are passing it on to others is their main/sole source of income. It is a long standing, dignified, and stable career path. Many of us are not trained in any secondary skills, nor have big inheritances, or an income generating spouse, thus if we don't teach, there is a risk of not being able to eat or pay rent.

No work = no money. Money = necessity for life. Piano students = money. Only taking piano students who are easy to teach and have been well trained = probably not enough money.

Tell me how that does not make sense to you.

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#2183151 - 11/16/13 12:23 AM Re: Bad Teachers [Re: AZNpiano]
Nikolas Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/26/07
Posts: 5243
Loc: Europe
I'm going to go the opposite way of AZPiano!

This year I got around 6 transfer students. And they all come from the same teacher. Well, she did an awesome job for the past couple of years (they all started together) and I'm pretty happy to have them as my students! smile
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