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#2196620 - 12/12/13 04:27 PM Hobbyist working on a grand
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
I've had a lot of fun working on my cheap upright this past year or so. Sooner or later I might buy a grand. Is it realistic for me to work on a grand or is it much harder or takes more dedicated tools or workbenches etc.?
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

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#2196638 - 12/12/13 05:03 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
TecFlip Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/16/12
Posts: 122
Loc: Kansas City, MO
Ive been having the same thoughts. Looking at a grand, it seems easier to repair, string, tune, etc because it is horizontal, unlike Uprights where you have to lay them on their backs. Techs usually make their own tools for the job, so I see no problem there. I would think that you would need a large table for the keybed/ action assembly because of its size, but if you have an oversized kitchen table, it will be no problem. I plan on picking up and old free upright when I run into some money. Hope this helps!
_________________________
-Jon Lee
YouTube Channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/JleewSongs
Yamaha P-35b

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#2196937 - 12/13/13 09:26 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
Anyone else?

Is it much harder for a hobbyist to work at home on a grand than on an upright? I am not talking about total rebuilding, but tuning, regulation and minor repairs etc.
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

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#2196945 - 12/13/13 09:57 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Rickster Offline


Registered: 03/25/06
Posts: 8491
Loc: Georgia, USA
Pinkfloydhomer, it is my opinion that hobbyist and amateurs are generally not welcome here… these guys despise and detest hobbyist and amateurs. You may eventually gain some acceptance here after you have gone through the gauntlet of insult and ridicule…

Good luck.

Rick
_________________________
Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel

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#2196964 - 12/13/13 10:32 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: Rickster]
Emmery Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 2366
Loc: Niagara Region, On. Canada
Originally Posted By: Rickster
Pinkfloydhomer, it is my opinion that hobbyist and amateurs are generally not welcome here… these guys despise and detest hobbyist and amateurs. You may eventually gain some acceptance here after you have gone through the gauntlet of insult and ridicule…

Good luck.

Rick


Not all of us are like this Rick. I have no issues with neophytes doing whatever they want with their own pianos. There are numerous things which can be figured out on their own or easily done with some good advice taken the right way. Whats important is that they understand the limitations for other things, things which require experience, extra expertise or special tooling. Its when they venture into this unprepared for, and uncharted territory that problems can occur.

I have a client who is a watchmaker/jewler and very good with his hands. He hung a set of hammers on his grand like a pro, actually better than what I have seen from most experienced techs. It did take him about a week to do it and I did give him advice along the way, but it can be done by some people.
_________________________
Piano Technician
George Brown College /85
Niagara Region

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#2197017 - 12/13/13 12:32 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: Rickster]
rxd Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/11/09
Posts: 1703
Loc: London, England
Originally Posted By: Rickster
Pinkfloydhomer, it is my opinion that hobbyist and amateurs are generally not welcome here… these guys despise and detest hobbyist and amateurs. You may eventually gain some acceptance here after you have gone through the gauntlet of insult and ridicule…

Good luck.

Rick


Most contention Is a result of people not reading accurately.

So far, in case nobody noticed, these posters have only made statements about their plans and intentions and no questions. If they asked a simple question, there would be many answers by now, as we well know. There is simply nothing to respond to and so everybody is silent until it is appropriate to speak. It is not the result of some tacit disapproval.

There are very few here who are actively against anybody doing anything they like to their own piano. It's their piano. In general, we have healthy boundaries. We have a peanut gallery and those who must answer every single thread whether they have anything to say or not.

There are some who somehow need to prove all others wrong in order to feel that they are right to themselves. It takes all sorts.

There are those who gave money when the forum was floundering who now think they own the forum but that's dying out, now.

When I first posted here, I was met with a totally unnecessary attack that only served to expose the abysmally low piano intelligence of the attacker. I was attacked twice in succession shortly after that. On observing the pattern of sycophantic posts between these attackers, I began to understand the dynamic there.

There are those who read a book and then decide to "educate" us poor ignorant professionals only to be totally surprised that there is more varied high level education among professional piano tuners than in many other professions. Perhaps because many come te the profession later in life as a second profession having previously been very successful in one or two other pursuits.

This is an excellent forum and is worth the odd bit of contention.

Does readership go up when there's contention? I think I have casually noticed this. I'm sure the advertisers don't mind. Nobody's been thrown off for a while to my knowledge so we can't all be that bad.

It's all there in the archives and it forms interesting patterns. If anybody wanted to study forum dynamics they could do worse than study this one. We're relatively healthy really in that we reflect society and family dynamics quite accurately. Most people must have relatives or neighbours just like us. It takes all sorts.
_________________________
Concert & Recording tuner-tech, London, England.
"in theory, practice and theory are the same thing. In practice, they're not." - Lawrence P. 'Yogi' Berra.

Eschew obfuscation.



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#2197041 - 12/13/13 01:07 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21447
Loc: Oakland
The original question: Grands are more difficult to work on than uprights. They require more tools and more skills.

The original poster: Has been asking questions that indicate problems that would be easy for a decent tech to figure out. That means that either he has not been reading or working carefully, or his piano is really bad, which is not what I have heard about the brand. It is an indication of his skill level or his ability to learn the skills necessary, and it is not promising.

To some people, that assessment may seem antagonistic. We get caught in the middle between those who want "nice" and providing honest information.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

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#2197051 - 12/13/13 01:22 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: BDB]
Emmery Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 2366
Loc: Niagara Region, On. Canada
Originally Posted By: BDB
The original question: Grands are more difficult to work on than uprights. They require more tools and more skills.

The original poster: Has been asking questions that indicate problems that would be easy for a decent tech to figure out. That means that either he has not been reading or working carefully, or his piano is really bad, which is not what I have heard about the brand. It is an indication of his skill level or his ability to learn the skills necessary, and it is not promising.

To some people, that assessment may seem antagonistic. We get caught in the middle between those who want "nice" and providing honest information.


I would have to agree with you on this BDB. I suppose an easy way to circumvent any misunderstandings is for techs to simply put a disclaimer after any advice and just state something to the effect of ... "without knowing any more details about the OP's experience and cabilities, damage or issues could arise from poor implimentation of process, proceed at your own risk".

Most sites have this also covered when people sign up they are informed that advice given here is not endorsed or checked as to its validity. For the most part here anyways, there are enough decent techs who would chime in if somebody is given poor or dubious recommendations.
_________________________
Piano Technician
George Brown College /85
Niagara Region

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#2197052 - 12/13/13 01:24 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
Well, thanks to you BDB for that assessment of my ability to read, work carefully, learn etc.
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

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#2197195 - 12/13/13 06:31 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: Rickster]
adamp88 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/24/09
Posts: 136
Loc: Omaha, NE
Originally Posted By: Rickster
Pinkfloydhomer, it is my opinion that hobbyist and amateurs are generally not welcome here… these guys despise and detest hobbyist and amateurs. You may eventually gain some acceptance here after you have gone through the gauntlet of insult and ridicule…

Good luck.

Rick


That strikes me as a rather unfair and oddly hostile assessment for a moderator to make, and it's not the first time you've made a similarly dismissive assessment of this forum and its members, Rickster. What gives?

Have there been amateurs who have been ridiculed here? Sure. Is that the de facto response from the techs to an amateur asking a question? Enough for you to justly claim that the techs here despise and detest amateurs? Hardly.


Edited by adamp88 (12/13/13 06:33 PM)
_________________________
Adam Schulte-Bukowinski
Piano Technician
Associate Member, PTG

ASB Piano Service
Omaha, NE

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#2197201 - 12/13/13 06:44 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
As an amateur who has asked a lot of questions, I would say that in general I've been treated very nice and have gotten a lot of good answers and insights from techs here.

It is true that I've also encountered the typical "don't mess with your piano, you will fail" - some techs here find it very hard to understand that I don't expect to be able to do as good a job as them and that I don't do it to save money, but to learn and because I think it is exciting. I've also had odd replies such as the one above from BDB where he attacks me out of nowhere. But I guess it's like that on every forum on the internet.


Edited by pinkfloydhomer (12/13/13 06:45 PM)
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

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#2197242 - 12/13/13 08:58 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Rickster Offline


Registered: 03/25/06
Posts: 8491
Loc: Georgia, USA
Originally Posted By: Adamp88
Have there been amateurs who have been ridiculed here? Sure. Is that the de facto response from the techs to an amateur asking a question? Enough for you to justly claim that the techs here despise and detest amateurs? Hardly.

Okay, Adam, you are right, and I apologize… despise and detest were perhaps the wrong words to use. How about loathe and abhor. smile

I don’t frequent this forum much any more, however, I do drop by on occasion; when I do, and see threads like this one, I feel the need to warn unwary travelers, like Pinkfloydhomer, about the treacherous territory they have drifted into.

Of course, it seems that Pinkfloydhomer can defend himself… smile

Rick
_________________________
Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel

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#2197244 - 12/13/13 09:04 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Johnkie Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/04/11
Posts: 708
Loc: England
And there was me imagining that moderators were in place to pour oil on troubled water ..... not to set light to it as well wink
_________________________
Concert Tuner & Technician for the past 49 years in the United Kingdom
and Member of the Pianoforte Tuners' Association (London)
www.jphillipspianoservices.freeindex.co.uk : E-mail jophillips06@aol.com

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#2197263 - 12/13/13 09:53 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1693
Loc: Conway, AR USA
If one is searching for milquetoast, it is not on the menu here.
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician

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#2197302 - 12/14/13 12:21 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
rxd Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/11/09
Posts: 1703
Loc: London, England
See how we all pull together when one of us steps out of line?
_________________________
Concert & Recording tuner-tech, London, England.
"in theory, practice and theory are the same thing. In practice, they're not." - Lawrence P. 'Yogi' Berra.

Eschew obfuscation.



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#2197357 - 12/14/13 05:38 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
I am grateful for all the answers in this thread, but I don't feel very much more informed. Let's say I have had success tuning, regulating and in minor ways repairing my upright. That means I have some experience, own some tools and books and have generally read a lot and tried a lot in practice.

How much harder would it be for me to continue doing this if I bought a grand? Not least of all the regulating.
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

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#2197378 - 12/14/13 07:46 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Withindale Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/09/11
Posts: 1939
Loc: Suffolk, England
Regulating a grand is a bit more difficult but it will provide you with a plentiful source of questions for this forum. You will never know until you try.
_________________________
Ian Russell
Schiedmayer & Soehne, 1925 Model 14, 55" upright
Ibach, 1922 49" upright (project piano)

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#2197406 - 12/14/13 09:33 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
Sounds reasonable.

What I can say is that it has been a very fun and educating experience to work on my upright. And there is no doubt that it plays much better now. I am not done, but it has made a huge difference to do the basic regulation of hammer blow distance, key dip, let-off and checking and most importantly (for the touch anyway) lowering the tension of the damper springs a lot and regulating collective and individual damper lift.

There is still stuff I can do. Most of all I can do the same things but with even more precision and consistency.

And sooner or later, I would like to work with the tone, needling etc.

Also, my pin setting technique and therefore the stability of my tunings suck. I think I'll buy the "Different Strokes" book.

I would really love to see a good video tutorial on pin/string setting.


Edited by pinkfloydhomer (12/14/13 09:35 AM)
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

Top
#2197425 - 12/14/13 10:32 AM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1693
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Originally Posted By: pinkfloydhomer
I've had a lot of fun working on my cheap upright this past year or so. Sooner or later I might buy a grand. Is it realistic for me to work on a grand or is it much harder or takes more dedicated tools or workbenches etc.?



With respect to regulation, there are so many types of pianos - both grand and upright - that the answer to your question may depend upon the particular technologies employed and what we are comparing these to.

The typical grand may take more time to regulate simply because there are more steps involved. A few additional specialized tools are required in grand regulation as well.

However, it does not necessarily follow that all grands are always more difficult and take more time to regulate than all uprights. Other factors come into play.

For example, it may take longer to regulate a grand where the repetition springs are adjusted by the skillful movement of a hand tool instead of the simple turn of a screw, and where there is a sostenuto to address as opposed to none.

Such things as the age of the instrument and whether or not one regulates largely with the grand action in the piano or on a workbench must be considered as well. Arguably, older often equates to more time; so does workbench.

There are enough differences within the various upright pianos that can make one more involved to regulate than the other. A direct blow action is far easier to regulate than a drop action, is one example that comes to mind.

And so, while it may be axiomatic that typical grand regulation is more involved and takes longer to effect, there are exceptions. An experienced tech can regulate a new Kawai grand action faster than an old Lester BR spinet. Once again, it depends upon what we are comparing.

As you search for the right grand to learn on, do the research and be aware of the differences.

Best wishes.


Edited by bkw58 (12/14/13 06:19 PM)
Edit Reason: clarity
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician

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#2197597 - 12/14/13 03:39 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: bkw58]
pinkfloydhomer Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/07/08
Posts: 215
That makes sense. I would probably buy either a new or recent, serious, not too cheap grand piano that was relatively easy to work on or alternatively whatever cheap one, possibly old, I could get my hands on.

Can any particular brands said said to be easier to work on? I live in Denmark so I do not have access to various pianos more or less exclusive to the American market. I have access to primarily world market pianos and secondarily Danish pianos and the major European brands.
_________________________
Amateur pianist working on: Bach. And amateur tuning, regulation and servicing of my own piano.
Piano: Frustrating and cheap Dongbei Nordiska 120CA upright from 2004.

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#2197751 - 12/14/13 10:18 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Gary Fowler Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/27/13
Posts: 375
Pink, with unlimited amount of time , I suppose one could learn to do anything!...rebuild a transmission, do a little brain surgery, even properly regulate a grand action

Good luck
_________________________
Making the world a better sounding place, one piano at a time...

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#2197946 - 12/15/13 01:03 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Hakki Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2480
Pink, Rickster has a point about this forum.

I myself experience the same situation. I really can't know why this is happening. Only the ones that are acting so can explain if they honestly decide to.

But it is what it is. Hobbyists, pianists with enthusiasm in tuning (like me), and similar are not welcomed here.
_________________________
Put in one of IMO, I think, to me, for me... or similar to all sentences I post

http://www.youtube.com/user/hakkithepianist

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#2197951 - 12/15/13 01:25 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Phil D Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/15/10
Posts: 551
Loc: London, England
Why are people so quick to tar everybody in a group with the same brush?
_________________________
Phil Dickson
The Cycling Piano Tuner

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#2197961 - 12/15/13 01:48 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: Phil D]
Hakki Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2480
Beyond Ricksters's point, in my case, it has almost turned into a form of embargo against my posts.
_________________________
Put in one of IMO, I think, to me, for me... or similar to all sentences I post

http://www.youtube.com/user/hakkithepianist

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#2197970 - 12/15/13 02:09 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Tuneless Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/17/13
Posts: 165
Loc: AZ, USA
Hakki, I am a DIYer, and am gradually working thru learning how to recondition my 125 year old upright, and will be slowly picking up tuning too. And I have to agree with most of the techs here, you are a bit of a pain in the neck. You beat subjects to death and if you don't like the answers, given as best these people can, you ask the question again in a more insistent manor. I have stopped reading the threads you have started as they are too painful to read. My thought being as I read them, why do these people put up with having to answer your insistent and not very different question threads, where you have used some nuance as an excuse for starting another new thread.

Just one beginners view of what I see. I do see some resistance in SOME techs to cooperating with DIYer, but it is not too bad as they eventually recognize that you are sincere about learning the correct way to work on pianos, and even if you screw the piano up, it isn't a great loss, if you are working on a non valuable instrument.
_________________________
Cynthia

Roland FP-50
Conover Upright, 1888/9, but a very low mileage piano. http://www.pbase.com/schnitz/conover_upright_piano__1888_or_9 .
Tuneless = Don't play piano(yet) and couldn't tune a guitar, much less a piano.
I'm technically very capable. I love my piano and love tinkering with it.

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#2197971 - 12/15/13 02:09 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Hakki Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2480
OTOH, this can have a negative impact against OPs that started these threads, that I can cause these threads to come to a halt.
_________________________
Put in one of IMO, I think, to me, for me... or similar to all sentences I post

http://www.youtube.com/user/hakkithepianist

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#2197979 - 12/15/13 02:31 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: Tuneless]
Hakki Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2480
Tuneless, I am not a DIY. I am an accomplished amateur pianist with an enthusiasm in discussing things related to piano tuning.

I don't want to go into this again but the situation here where I live (Ankara, Turkey) is different from the western world.

The piano is not our culture. Almost more than 99% of the population has never in their life time has seen a piano being performed live. The city I live has a population of about 5 million and I have access to only 3 tuners.

So, from time to time I come here and ask questions here that these 3 tuners are not able to answer.

At times, I get different answers from different posters. At such a situation I have to find the answer that is at least supported by the majority of tuners here.

To justify some of the answers I got, there might be situations as you refer that I might have asked the same question in a different way.

But, and this is really a big BUT.
All this has nothing to do with the tuners on this forum.

On the contrary I have expressed it a few times that how I was grateful for all the replies and that this forum existed.

So, to me, I think that my posts, be it a language thing or some other reasons, are considerably misinterpreted.

OTOH, there is not much I can do against prejudiced posts against me. I just feel unhappy when such a thing happens.

Of course there has been some unpleasant posts between some of the posters and me, that I would have not preferred them to be so. Inevitably, I had to respond to some personal attacks against me.

But, again, Rickster should have a point here. He is more experienced about this forum than me.
_________________________
Put in one of IMO, I think, to me, for me... or similar to all sentences I post

http://www.youtube.com/user/hakkithepianist

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#2197995 - 12/15/13 02:53 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: pinkfloydhomer]
Blues beater Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/04/13
Posts: 133
Loc: Austin, Texas USA
In my professional forum -- IATN, Independent Automotive Technicians Network, there is a similar thread. There is frequently scorn heaped on those who go Autozone, get a code read in their vehicle and then replace a bunch of parts that do not address the problem. Then they likely return the parts as "defective." BUT what I pointed out in MY professional forum I think also applies here. We (Automotive shop owners)/you (RPTs) see the DIY failures. We/you tend to remember the most egregious of these failures. What about all those who maintain their piano reasonably well and are invisible to you? Neither group sees a representative sample.

In most every field these individuals do exist. There are those who can do an expert restoration on a 1920 Buick/1920 Steinway grand and might have been clueless when they started and their first questions might make you roll your eyes. It will probably take them much longer than it would those who do it for a living, but people spend their time in far worse ways!

Granted, those that ask questions and have no interest in informative and constructive answers are a lost cause, but when the answer is "You can't do it, call an expert," I don't consider that a constructive answer. "Be prepared for a lengthy project, a challenging and expensive hobby for these specific reasons..." that is often totally fair. Better that than playing video games all night or snort crack.

I am fortunate that my piano tech has been very tactful with me about what I don't know, helpful with advice, sold me a tuning hammer cheap he no longer uses, and etc. etc. I got to bail him out when he got over his head on a brake job he was doing in the dirt at his house. He has come around to telling me "Don, I think you can do it." Sometimes he says "you probably CAN do it but do you really want to? This is what it will take."
_________________________
Don, playing the blues in Austin, Texas on a 48" family heirloom Steinway upright, 100 year old 54" Weber upright, and unknown make turn of the century 54" upright -- says "Whittier NY" on the plate

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#2198050 - 12/15/13 04:11 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: Hakki]
DoelKees Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/01/10
Posts: 1710
Loc: Vancouver, Canada
Originally Posted By: Hakki
Tuneless, I am not a DIY. I am an accomplished amateur pianist with an enthusiasm in discussing things related to piano tuning.

I don't want to go into this again but the situation here where I live (Ankara, Turkey) is different from the western world.

The piano is not our culture. Almost more than 99% of the population has never in their life time has seen a piano being performed live. The city I live has a population of about 5 million and I have access to only 3 tuners.

I'm surprised you haven't reached the conclusion yet that you're better off tuning your piano yourself, for example by buying tunelab and using it properly, not like one of those university tuners you described. If you somehow insist on tuning by ear you can use tunelab (or any of the professional ETD's) as a mentor in the beginning.

It's not as difficult to tune your own piano as some of the professionals claim it is.

To be able to go out to any customer's piano you've never seen, tune it in under 2 hours, and leave it stable enough to last for another 6 months or year is probably what they are taking about: that is indeed very difficult and takes a long time to learn.

Kees

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#2198066 - 12/15/13 04:34 PM Re: Hobbyist working on a grand [Re: DoelKees]
Hakki Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2480
Kees,

The last Russian tuner did use the Tunelab in a wrong way indeed. I am hoping to get him use it properly next time.

Before his visit, I will most probably come here (again) and ask about (probably several questions again) how to setup Tunelab for a Kawai RX-2 piano. Then, I will hope that I can explain what I learned from here to him ( not an easy thing considering my limited communication with him due to language problems.). Or I will try to use his iPad myself to set it up if he allows me.
_________________________
Put in one of IMO, I think, to me, for me... or similar to all sentences I post

http://www.youtube.com/user/hakkithepianist

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