Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) End Stage Fright
End Stage Fright
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Topic Options
#2232160 - 02/15/14 04:43 PM Playing things that are far too hard
ece9600 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/06/14
Posts: 5
Hello

I'd welcome any advice. I started the piano in January, having previously played classical guitar as a child/teenager. I am really enjoying it and am preparing for grade 1.

I've also started playing a few pieces that are probably too hard for me, given that I've only been playing a month, eg Bach's Prelude No 1 from the WTC which I can play well enough to actually enjoy playing, if that makes any sense, and bits of the Chopin A Minor waltz (post.) which I can play the easy bits of at a snail's pace.

In your opinion, is it a bad idea to attempt things you're not really ready for? If I could, I'd far rather learn the piano by playing the music I love, not the stuff that's written for beginners. I realise that beginner's things often have a learning objective so I'm not neglecting them and am also working on exercises and scales etc. But is there a risk of developing bad habits if I try to run before I can walk?

Top
(ads P/S)
Petrof Pianos

piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#2232171 - 02/15/14 05:13 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
Stubbie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/16/10
Posts: 337
Loc: Midwest USA
Do you have a teacher? Can you read music well? Are you using a method book or collection of beginner level pieces?

Generally, *far* too hard is a bad idea.

Yes, it's normal to want to play the things you like, but at one month into piano--a little more time getting some basics in would serve you much better in the long run.

Patience, grasshopper.
_________________________
Wherever you go, there you are.


Top
#2232173 - 02/15/14 05:21 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
Tubbie0075 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/17/10
Posts: 544
I think you know the answers to your questions. You do what you have to do. Some people has to learn it the hard way. At least you are still learning. Let us know how you go in a year's time.

Good luck!

Top
#2232181 - 02/15/14 05:35 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
ece9600 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/06/14
Posts: 5
Thanks, both of you. I do have a teacher and we're doing the Carol Barratt course books. I can read treble clef but find that bass clef is an effort- my brain goes through a process of thinking "that looks like a C to me so it's really an E" which makes sight reading quite hard.

At the moment I'm trying to do 10 mins exercises, 10 mins scales, 20 mins on my assigned pieces and 20 mins on whatever I want (the harder stuff), aiming for 7 days a week but it tends to be more like 5 given work and children. I should probably spend longer on what I'm supposed to be playing, I think. I shall try to channel David Carradine ;-)

Top
#2232280 - 02/15/14 09:48 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
hreichgott Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 496
Loc: western MA, USA
The harder stuff is great as long as it's stretching you and you're enjoying it. If you're getting stalled/frustrated then put it on the shelf for a while and visit it again later. It definitely is good to also have some pieces you can play beautifully and with confidence.
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Currently obsessed with Schubert/D. 845 and Ravel/Tombeau de Couperin
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

Top
#2232294 - 02/15/14 10:29 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
Silver Keys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/21/13
Posts: 56
Loc: Western N.Y.
What Stubbie and hreichgott said.

Top
#2232360 - 02/16/14 12:52 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
earlofmar Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/21/13
Posts: 1118
Loc: Australia
I self confess to being very similar in that I want to play the hard stuff but after playing for just over a year a couple of things have been learned. Firstly if you stretch too far then the piece begins to feel like a weight and you never finish it because of that one little thing (or several) you can't get right. If you stretch just enough then you feel a real breakthrough and some of the things you thought hard before seem easier. However attempting a piece you are not quite ready for generally means you will need to spend a lot more time on the piece to iron out one or more new technical requirements. If you have the time then fine but if you are time poor this needs to be re-thought.

After I read a post in which a teacher recommended learning up to 40 new pieces per year I did a bit more reading on the subject and had a change of heart in the direction I was going ie only learning a much smaller amount. I found I was constantly trying to force improvement by taking on harder and harder pieces to the point I was bogged down in technical challenges only getting a few of the pieces finished and having to call a halt on most of them. So now I am taking a different approach in that I am attempting to learn a few hard pieces, a few at what I consider my level and a lot more at a level below that. The reasoning is obvious, filling in missing technical gaps, satisfaction in learning a piece in under a week (and recording it), improvement to sight reading, as well as improving the way I learn which is a skill in itself and like everything in piano is leaned by repetition.

So my advice: yes take on a harder piece to stretch yourself and to find out what awaits you at higher levels, but keep a rein on ambition for the fundamentals you are learning now are very important. It is also a bit like the tortoise and the hare story, rushing too fast burns you out while a slow and steady pace gets you to the same place in better shape.

A final thought, for I remember well how difficult the first few (the first six for me) months are. It will get better and soon enough you will be attempting more interesting pieces. The Bach Prelude in C is a great piece and I have seen it rated as anything from grade 2 to 5. I recorded it for a recital here after five and a half months learning and I am not sorry I did as it was a much need confidence booster. I have the rest of my life to get it right lol
_________________________
I thought I understood endurance sport; then I took up piano
XXXIII-4-XXX

Top
#2232409 - 02/16/14 04:07 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: earlofmar]
SwissMS Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/09/11
Posts: 643
Loc: Switzerland
thumb for what earlofmar said. Taking on pieces that are too far above your abilities can actually slow down your development of skills.

When I first returned to piano as an adult (I had a couple of years of lesson as a pre teenager) I jumped into advanced material very quickly. My teacher assigned Chopin nocturnes, Mozart K545, etc. I played them, but very poorly, and I worked on them for months. I realised I had big holes in my foundation and lacked the technical skill to do the pieces justice.

My second return to lessons as an adult was in Jan. 2011. This time I worked through the basics with a teacher, and built up my technique through scales and pieces at my level. Progress was much steadier, and now I can play the more advanced pieces much more effectively. I still learn a mix of easy pieces and a couple that are a grade or two higher than what is currently comfortable. We pick those pieces to address a specific technique that I need to acquire. Now I feel like I have a sold foundation and can progress correctly. So, at least for me, stretching a little, but not a lot, is the way to improve the quickest.
_________________________
XXXIII-5-XXIX,XXVII-4-XXIV

Top
#2232411 - 02/16/14 04:13 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: SwissMS]
evamar Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/02/12
Posts: 516
Loc: Spanish living in UK
Originally Posted By: SwissMS
So, at least for me, stretching a little, but not a lot, is the way to improve the quickest.


Agree, no point in getting stuck and frustrated, you need to see some improving. Pick one piece over your current level -not a virtuoso one!- and continue with the graded pieces. Once that one is done, pick another.
_________________________
October 2013. Kawai CA65!

Time you enjoy wasting was not wasted
Because I actually like playing the piano in spite of the large number of mistakes I make... so many that for many people I'm just wasting my time. whome


Top
#2232414 - 02/16/14 04:36 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2227
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Originally Posted By: ece9600
At the moment I'm trying to do 10 mins exercises, 10 mins scales, 20 mins on my assigned pieces and 20 mins on whatever I want
Have you been playing for a month or just taken lessons for a month but have played longer? Did your teacher assign the scales and exercises? What exercises?

Playing harder pieces is fine if they're just a part of what you do at the piano. Playing scales with less than a year's experience I'd be more concerned about. The exercises? That depends on the exercises.


_________________________
Richard

Top
#2232578 - 02/16/14 12:40 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
landorrano Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2443
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: ece9600


In your opinion, is it a bad idea to attempt things you're not really ready for?


Hi, Ece. For my part, I think that it's a good thing. I've always done it, and I've always had the impression that this is an important part of my progress. Never with the idea of really being able to play these pieces but just to read them if you like, to get to know them. It is fascinating to see how is constructed music that you listen to, it greatly deepens your appreciation of the music and of the genius of its author.

As for developing bad habits, could be, but having a good time on the piano is a good habit, definitely to be cultivated.

Top
#2232640 - 02/16/14 03:09 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: landorrano]
Stubbie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/16/10
Posts: 337
Loc: Midwest USA
Originally Posted By: landorrano
Originally Posted By: ece9600


In your opinion, is it a bad idea to attempt things you're not really ready for?


Hi, Ece. For my part, I think that it's a good thing. I've always done it, and I've always had the impression that this is an important part of my progress. Never with the idea of really being able to play these pieces but just to read them if you like, to get to know them. It is fascinating to see how is constructed music that you listen to, it greatly deepens your appreciation of the music and of the genius of its author.

As for developing bad habits, could be, but having a good time on the piano is a good habit, definitely to be cultivated.


I agree with this for the most part, but not for someone one month into piano. What you describe above is reasonable for someone with good sightreading and listening skills and some knowledge of how pieces are constructed, but not for someone still in the early stages of reading notes on both staffs.

Originally Posted By: ece9600
Thanks, both of you. I do have a teacher and we're doing the Carol Barratt course books. I can read treble clef but find that bass clef is an effort- my brain goes through a process of thinking "that looks like a C to me so it's really an E" which makes sight reading quite hard.

At the moment I'm trying to do 10 mins exercises, 10 mins scales, 20 mins on my assigned pieces and 20 mins on whatever I want (the harder stuff), aiming for 7 days a week but it tends to be more like 5 given work and children. I should probably spend longer on what I'm supposed to be playing, I think. I shall try to channel David Carradine ;-)


Underlining mine.
_________________________
Wherever you go, there you are.


Top
#2233162 - 02/17/14 01:24 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: Stubbie]
landorrano Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2443
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: Stubbie

I agree with this for the most part, but not for someone one month into piano.


Hi Stubbie. You may be right. Maybe you is, maybe you ain't ... but if someone had told me that back when I was a month into piano I sure wouldn't have listened to them !!! No regrets!

Top
#2233175 - 02/17/14 01:42 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
Ataru074 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/22/11
Posts: 223
Loc: Houston, TX
I have my own golden rule of attainable difficulties... a given piece you should be able to read and play it reasonably well at the pace of one page per week, if it's repertoire. Exercises and etudes are different and takes more time because they need to be beyond your reach and might even take 2 to 4 time as much... meaning.. even a month for the first page while you're tackling the technical difficulties.

from that 1 page per week, to "ready for performance" is a totally different story.

there is no shame on dropping one piece that is too hard to allow your growth and than go back and pick it up again after some time, sometimes months, sometimes years... I found out that if you spent enough quality time with a given piece, it will come back in a matter of hours at most.

For me is also true that you can make the opposite mistake... spend too much time on repertoire that is not too challenging for you and you won't develop technically... but you might develop musicality from an increased knowledge of the repertoire.

As practical suggestion, especially as beginner, aim to grow technically as fast as you can until you get beyond the level of pieces that you'd love to perform... the better you're, the easier becomes to accumulate repertoire and the amount of material that you can learn in a short amount of time becomes incredibly vast.
_________________________
===============================================
working on:
Beethoven: Op. 110
Rachmaninoff: Op 3/2
===============================================

Top
#2233305 - 02/17/14 04:50 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
ece9600 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/06/14
Posts: 5
Thank you, everyone.

I was interested to see someone saying playing scales this early was concerning. Is that right? Scales are unavoidable if you want to do grades, surely?

Top
#2233354 - 02/17/14 06:31 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
zrtf90 Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/29/12
Posts: 2227
Loc: Ireland (ex England)
Yeah, I really believe scales are bad with less than a year's experience and especially so without a teacher and/or beginning with C major.

But if you're going the exam route the Grade 1 syllabus shouldn't begin without a year's foundation first and you should be with a teacher anyway, if you're going that route, who may (or may not) begin with B major so that you can work up to C, G, D and F (ABRSM Grade I scales).

I would also advise an adult to start at a higher grade if grades are going to be taken. There's less need for token markers of progress for an adult and a good teacher would ensure exam requirements are met well enough that fear of failure shouldn't be an issue. In fact, I don't even know anyone who's failed an exam below grade 6.

There are people who've posted here doing 30 minutes of scales every day as soon as they get their first piano. That is so dangerous as well as being a complete waste of time!

That's why I asked if it was your teacher who assigned the scales.

_________________________
Richard

Top
#2233372 - 02/17/14 07:06 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
earlofmar Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/21/13
Posts: 1118
Loc: Australia
I would second the delay in playing scales. At just fourteen months in to my journey I am better prepared to do scales today than I was in my first few months. After playing quite a bit of repertoire in my first year I think it prepared me for scales, particularity the fingering which makes more sense, intuitive actually, now I have some experience. I did start scales with my teacher in the first few months but dropped them until fairly recently. Now I see that not doing scales have not hampered my playing I am only doing them now to get used to the scale itself and not as a blind exercise.
_________________________
I thought I understood endurance sport; then I took up piano
XXXIII-4-XXX

Top
#2233494 - 02/18/14 01:34 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: SwissMS]
FarmGirl Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 02 2013


Registered: 09/14/10
Posts: 1795
Loc: Scottsdale, AZ
Originally Posted By: SwissMS
thumb for what earlofmar said. Taking on pieces that are too far above your abilities can actually slow down your development of skills.

When I first returned to piano as an adult (I had a couple of years of lesson as a pre teenager) I jumped into advanced material very quickly. My teacher assigned Chopin nocturnes, Mozart K545, etc. I played them, but very poorly, and I worked on them for months. I realised I had big holes in my foundation and lacked the technical skill to do the pieces justice.

My second return to lessons as an adult was in Jan. 2011. This time I worked through the basics with a teacher, and built up my technique through scales and pieces at my level. Progress was much steadier, and now I can play the more advanced pieces much more effectively. I still learn a mix of easy pieces and a couple that are a grade or two higher than what is currently comfortable. We pick those pieces to address a specific technique that I need to acquire. Now I feel like I have a sold foundation and can progress correctly. So, at least for me, stretching a little, but not a lot, is the way to improve the quickest.

+1
This my second time around as an adult returner as well. It's funny I did almost exactly what you did, SwissMS. I did 7 years as a child. My last piece as a child was Chopin's raindrop prelude. So I did not like to go back to "baby" pieces. Big mistake. I too took on Moz 545. Ahhh I still remember the tormentingly uneven scale. The more I play the worse it sounded. I thought I had never heard anything as horrible as this. I came back to piano 2009. This time I too took a step back. Did scales, arpeggio, exercises and went back to manageable pieces. It was much better.
_________________________
Pieces at work - Schubert Sonata D960 2nd mvmnt Andante sostenute, Bach f minor Fugue WTC Bk1, Rachmaninoff Elegie Op 3 #1, Chopin Trois Nouvelles Etudes #1, Haru No Umi-the Sea In Spring (Michio Miyagi) for Flute & Piano (Nov Diversity Fair at work)

Top
#2233700 - 02/18/14 12:06 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: zrtf90]
landorrano Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2443
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: zrtf90
Yeah, I really believe scales are bad with less than a year's experience and especially so without a teacher and/or beginning with C major.


Originally Posted By: earlofmar
I would second the delay in playing scales.


I take the opposite point of view, I believe that scales are really good, from day one. Better with a teacher, even better with a good teacher, and even better with a real good teacher, but that's so with pretty much anything.

And beginning with C-major. Parallel motion, contrary motion, one two three four octaves. All tonalities, it needn't take a long time. An adult, if he's got a little free time, can get to doing all tonalities in a couple of weeks, even in a day or two.

It's a great way for you and your piano to get to know each other, with possibilty for stable relationship if affinities! Better than spending weeks and months and years just hopscotching around middle C. I mean, you've paid for 88 keys: use 'em !!!

Plus, lt's a great musical exercise, and an excellent help with reading.

Top
#2233908 - 02/18/14 07:32 PM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
ShannonG Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/14
Posts: 135
Loc: Canada
I find that my main reason for taking on pieces beyond me is that the boiled down 'easy piano' versions often are unrecognizable. I'd rather fight for a week or two and play the song as it was intended than poke through some of the modified versions.
I have a truly horrible adaptation of In The Mood by Joe Garland that I would rather use to light a campfire than play.
_________________________
How did I end up with 3 pianos? Starting to think I may need a 12 step program...

Top
#2236206 - 02/23/14 01:56 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ShannonG]
Cristian88 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/27/14
Posts: 22
Originally Posted By: ShannonG
I find that my main reason for taking on pieces beyond me is that the boiled down 'easy piano' versions often are unrecognizable. I'd rather fight for a week or two and play the song as it was intended than poke through some of the modified versions. I have a truly horrible adaptation of In The Mood by Joe Garland that I would rather use to light a campfire than play.


I agree with this. I've been playing some easy note piano music and it's horrid to listen to and some parts are downright unrecognizable. If the number 1 reason to play the piano is for enjoyment, I think I get the most enjoyment out of actually producing music that is pleasant to my ears, not an abortion of an interpretation, even if it takes a little longer to learn.

Top
#2237250 - 02/25/14 08:00 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: ece9600]
WiseBuff Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/03/05
Posts: 770
Loc: Brighton Colorado
Seems to me that we all long to play the hard ones...to effortlessly float through beautiful music. I climbed Long's Peak (a 14ner here in Colorado) once and the view was incredible, the feeling of accomplishment amazing, indescribable. Glad it wasn't my first climbing experience however. I needed to learn and strengthen first. Once you get past basic beginner taking on a challenging one is inspiring. Once I got to all challenging ones it was overwhelming. There were specific skills I didn't have as solid as I needed so now I play so lower level pieces to build speed and mastery and work on a more challenging one too. You may have to experiment a bit to find what works for you.
_________________________



Love to learn

Top
#2237271 - 02/25/14 09:03 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: Cristian88]
Morodiene Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 10743
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted By: Cristian88
Originally Posted By: ShannonG
I find that my main reason for taking on pieces beyond me is that the boiled down 'easy piano' versions often are unrecognizable. I'd rather fight for a week or two and play the song as it was intended than poke through some of the modified versions. I have a truly horrible adaptation of In The Mood by Joe Garland that I would rather use to light a campfire than play.


I agree with this. I've been playing some easy note piano music and it's horrid to listen to and some parts are downright unrecognizable. If the number 1 reason to play the piano is for enjoyment, I think I get the most enjoyment out of actually producing music that is pleasant to my ears, not an abortion of an interpretation, even if it takes a little longer to learn.


Then seek out better arrangements. I agree there are some that aren't recognizable, and then there are some that you can add a few things or change them slightly to make them sound better, and some you just avoid. But don't forget, there is tons of awesome music out there at any level in any style. It may not be recognizable, but very enjoyable and fulfilling.
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
#2237278 - 02/25/14 09:12 AM Re: Playing things that are far too hard [Re: Morodiene]
MrPozor Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/11/12
Posts: 58
Loc: near Paris, France
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
But don't forget, there is tons of awesome music out there at any level in any style. It may not be recognizable, but very enjoyable and fulfilling.


This is absolutely true. Of course we would all like to be able to play the masterpieces of piano music but even an easy piece can be very interesting to learn and master. It can offer a lot of room for interpretation and be very enjoyable to play.
There is just no direct correlation between the difficulty of a piece and its appeal in my opinion. It's just that we know the masterpieces much better than the easier repertoire because they are what we are hearing all the time on the radio etc.
_________________________
Currently learning:

Equipment: Petrof 118 L1

Top

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
128 registered (36251, alex-kid, ando, Almaviva, anotherscott, 37 invisible), 1394 Guests and 45 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74213 Members
42 Forums
153520 Topics
2249727 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Buzz-project: How do composer earn big money?
by talfi composer
04/17/14 09:10 AM
Buzz-project: How do composer earn big money?
by talfi composer
04/17/14 09:07 AM
A question about app.box
by LarryShone
04/17/14 07:08 AM
Re-stringing an 84yr old Grand.....?
by Grandpianoman
04/17/14 01:56 AM
Theme identification
by Polyphonist
04/17/14 01:26 AM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission