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#2240812 - 03/03/14 05:04 PM Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms
RaindropPrelude Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/12/09
Posts: 73
Hey all,

A year ago I purchased the the Roland FP-7 model - this is my primary practice keyboard which I use for practice about an hour/day typically (or more, but never longer than a 1 hour period). In the past 2 weeks I've been noticing unspecific hand and forearm discomfort after playing the keyboard for 20 minutes +.
However, playing my piano teachers Yamaha grand, and my own acoustic upright I've noticed either absolutely no pain, or only discomfort after playing for a long period. So essentially, it seems the digital keyboard I am most sensitive too, while an acoustic instrument gives me almost no discomfort.

Is this a common issue? I don't understand if it would be my own playing or the digital keyboard (and then that in conjunction with some bad habit perhaps). And I don't get why I am only experiencing this now after having this instrument for over a year. Any help would be appreciated.
_________________________
If they cut off both hands, I will compose music anyway holding the pen in my teeth. - Shostakovich

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#2240830 - 03/03/14 05:30 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11967
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
I have owned an FP-7 for many years, but only up until this past summer was it the only instrument I had to practice on. From this experience I developed a lot of tension in my playing, and I think it was because I was subconsciously bracing myself for the harsh bottoming out in the keybed of the Roland. When I returned to playing my acoustic grand after the summer I was able to work out the problems within a week or so, so I am positive it was the FP-7. Now I have to be conscious of my playing that I don't react that way in the future.

For this reason I have upgraded to the Kawai MP11 and am ecstatic with the results. Also, the Kawai VPC1 I had owned for a brief period of time was excellent - both so much better than the feel of the FP-7. Even my parent's Yamaha clavinova was better feeling. I think you should look into getting something else - I highly recommend Kawai. What is your budget?
_________________________
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Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2240831 - 03/03/14 05:31 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
peterws Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3646
Loc: Northern England.
First, try measuring your relative seat height compared to the acoustic . . . .mine was out by less than an inch; it made a big difference. My hands were too high and it affected my lower back since the music and keys were correspondingly lower. The average music stand on a (slab) digital is a health and safety disaster . . . that might also cause problems which translate to your hands. Just a long shot, but who knows?


Edited by peterws (03/03/14 05:32 PM)
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

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#2240833 - 03/03/14 05:34 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
Dave Horne Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5276
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
forearm discomfort ... ?

Top forearm muscles?

Anytime anyone has pain, discomfort, tension, whatever, in their top forearm muscles, you can be sure they are playing using the wrong set of muscles.
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#2240934 - 03/03/14 08:23 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: Morodiene]
RaindropPrelude Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/12/09
Posts: 73
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I have owned an FP-7 for many years, but only up until this past summer was it the only instrument I had to practice on. From this experience I developed a lot of tension in my playing, and I think it was because I was subconsciously bracing myself for the harsh bottoming out in the keybed of the Roland. When I returned to playing my acoustic grand after the summer I was able to work out the problems within a week or so, so I am positive it was the FP-7. Now I have to be conscious of my playing that I don't react that way in the future.

For this reason I have upgraded to the Kawai MP11 and am ecstatic with the results. Also, the Kawai VPC1 I had owned for a brief period of time was excellent - both so much better than the feel of the FP-7. Even my parent's Yamaha clavinova was better feeling. I think you should look into getting something else - I highly recommend Kawai. What is your budget?


Hmm so it's not just me - What do you mean by "bottoming out" though?

I can definitely feel there's something not meshing with myself and the Roland atm, but it sucks because it was almost $2000 and my dad bought it for me as a gift, and I dunno how he'd react to me complaining that after a year it's not working out lol. My budget would be around the $2000 area. I send half my time in my apartment downtown and half at my parents house uptown (of which we are currently looking into buying a grand for). So the purpose of the digital is something smaller that I can practice on during the few days during the week I am downtown.
_________________________
If they cut off both hands, I will compose music anyway holding the pen in my teeth. - Shostakovich

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#2240956 - 03/03/14 09:10 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
ShiverMeTimbres Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/08/14
Posts: 207
"Dad, I'm going to need to trade the keyboard you bought me in. It's causing me some pain". Honesty is better than suffering through playing.

http://rsi.unl.edu/music.html

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#2240962 - 03/03/14 09:24 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
Are you playing your DP at too low a volume, and therefore compensating by hitting the keys much harder than you would when playing an acoustic?

I see this 'problem' frequently when I watch others playing in DP stores - they bang because they can. If they played like that on acoustics, they'd deafen themselves and everyone near them.

You should always play your DP at the same volume for the same key strike as on acoustics.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2240985 - 03/03/14 10:31 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
Vansh Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/18/13
Posts: 46
There's a couple of possibilities that come to mind:

1. What is the height of the digital piano compared to you, relative to when you're on an acoustic? Ideally you should measure the key height from the floor as well as the seat height for both instruments, and see if they differ. You might have tension from playing the digital at a different height relative to your body.

2. Bennevis already mentioned the volume thing. That's the other thing that I'd consider. I don't know how well the Roland plays, especially if its velocity curve (i.e. how fast you press the key -> how loud the sound is) is close to an acoustic, but you may be doing something different to try to get the same sound out that you'd expect from an acoustic, such as by playing the keys harder.

3. Also, what is your practice routine? I've found that since buying a digital piano, my practice routine is fairly sloppy nowadays. Previously, I'd have to go to the practice rooms at school, sit through the waiting list, and then have a maximum of 2 hours to practice. This meant that I had a more structured or orderly schedule -- some warmups, some of my easier pieces, then harder pieces once I'm fully warmed up. Nowadays, with the digital piano at home, I tend to plunk out notes for brief stretches, whenever it strikes my fancy. It's more convenient this way, but I find that I tend to skip the "boring" warmups and such and start tackling the harder pieces without really warming up, and then my fingers will feel sore afterwards. So I don't know if you're doing something different on your digital compared with acoustic.

On the other hand, unless your digital piano's action is like an acoustic's, it's entirely possible that it has something to do with the digital piano. But then there's too many possibilities so I think it'd be hard to pin down.

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#2241020 - 03/04/14 12:36 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
Marcos Daniel Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/07/13
Posts: 166
Loc: Punta Alta, Buenos Aires, Arge...
Are your hands big?
If keys have a short fulcrum, the response from the front to the back of the key is very uneven, playing as close to the front of keys as possible could help (specially true for black keys and big hands).

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#2241071 - 03/04/14 04:00 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
If you search back through you will find that the Roland PHAIII action is not recommended for people with wrist, hand, finger problems, by people who have used it. Possibly the same applies to the FP7 and PHAII? The supposed cause is hard bottoming out, push back from the keys, and shape and height of the keys.

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#2241077 - 03/04/14 04:37 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
peterws Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3646
Loc: Northern England.
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
If you search back through you will find that the Roland PHAIII action is not recommended for people with wrist, hand, finger problems, by people who have used it. Possibly the same applies to the FP7 and PHAII? The supposed cause is hard bottoming out, push back from the keys, and shape and height of the keys.


Surely any acoustic piano has a hard bottoming out?
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

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#2241083 - 03/04/14 04:59 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
phunqe Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/21/14
Posts: 48
As mentioned, I would also start by measuring all heights. Even if it feels like they are the same, a small amount can make a difference.
Remember to factor in the chair, if you have different ones and one is for example harder than the other (which can make a height difference). If you can, try with the same chair to rule that out.

I would also use my phone to record (from the side) a snippet of me playing the same piece on both pianos and see if there are any noticeable differences that I might not pick up consciously.

If everything seems to fail, looking at a replacement is probably the best option. Since you've practiced a long time on it you might simply have reached a point where any shortcomings or "incompatibilities" in the keybed are taking their toll.

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#2241151 - 03/04/14 09:04 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: peterws]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
Originally Posted By: peterws
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
If you search back through you will find that the Roland PHAIII action is not recommended for people with wrist, hand, finger problems, by people who have used it. Possibly the same applies to the FP7 and PHAII? The supposed cause is hard bottoming out, push back from the keys, and shape and height of the keys.


Surely any acoustic piano has a hard bottoming out?

Is this a joke?

Of course it's all relative what we mean by hard bottoming out, but relatively the PHAIII is the worse. Try it for yourself and compare with others.

I don't see why an acoustic would claim to be hard too. The hammer action escapes from the key so its stop is not felt, and the felts below the key and length of key provide the cushion. On PHAIII there is felt too below the key, but also the hammer stops without escaping the key by hitting felt, and that is felt by the fingers on the key. Hard felt, and obviously not thick enough as recognised in their marketing speak for PHAIV. Unravel the 'felts' for material and feeling in in that!

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#2241178 - 03/04/14 09:50 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
joflah Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/09/09
Posts: 307
Loc: St. Louis, MO, USA
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
Originally Posted By: peterws
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
If you search back through you will find that the Roland PHAIII action is not recommended for people with wrist, hand, finger problems, by people who have used it. Possibly the same applies to the FP7 and PHAII? The supposed cause is hard bottoming out, push back from the keys, and shape and height of the keys.


Surely any acoustic piano has a hard bottoming out?

Is this a joke?

Of course it's all relative what we mean by hard bottoming out, but relatively the PHAIII is the worse. Try it for yourself and compare with others.

I don't see why an acoustic would claim to be hard too. The hammer action escapes from the key so its stop is not felt, and the felts below the key and length of key provide the cushion. On PHAIII there is felt too below the key, but also the hammer stops without escaping the key by hitting felt, and that is felt by the fingers on the key. Hard felt, and obviously not thick enough as recognised in their marketing speak for PHAIV. Unravel the 'felts' for material and feeling in in that!


Obviously written with a deeply felt pen.
_________________________
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#2241186 - 03/04/14 10:09 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
btcomm Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/07
Posts: 275
Loc: California
The only Roland I ever tried that didn't have a hard bottoming out was/is the FP4. Unfortunately it doesn't sound too good.

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#2241189 - 03/04/14 10:17 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha

I don't see why an acoustic would claim to be hard too. The hammer action escapes from the key so its stop is not felt, and the felts below the key and length of key provide the cushion. On PHAIII there is felt too below the key, but also the hammer stops without escaping the key by hitting felt, and that is felt by the fingers on the key. Hard felt, and obviously not thick enough as recognised in their marketing speak for PHAIV. Unravel the 'felts' for material and feeling in in that!

Would you care to elaborate your explanation in simple English, so that the non-technical amongst us (i.e. me, myself, yours truly grin) can understand?

Are you talking about the kickback from the hammer? Because the hammer does escape the key, and you can feel it. If the hammer is always attached to the key, it's not a hammer, it's just a lever.

As for the 'hard' bottoming-out, yes, it is when compared to other Japanese brands (Kawai and Yamaha APs & DPs). But play some European acoustic brands, and you'll find similarly firm actions. The Grotrian-Steinweg grand that I sometimes play on (and it's only a few years old) feel very similar to the PHA-III on my V-Piano.

I've also played some older acoustic grands where the (previously plushy) felt beneath the most used keys in the middle have worn/flattened down, and it's disconcerting when the bottoming of the key action changes depending on where on the keyboard the key is.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2241192 - 03/04/14 10:27 AM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 11967
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
My Petrof had a hard bottoming-out too until I recently had all the felt replaced. It had never been replaced and the instrument I think is from around 1988, so understandably it was time. The feel is much better now. I think with the FP-7 perhaps there is that lack of enough felt coupled with a very light action that caused the unnecessary strain I felt.

edited to add: Something else to keep in mind is the repertoire being played. I think with heavy Romantic or later music there's more of a chance to experience this than with Baroque or Classical periods, as less arm weight is used in the latter.


Edited by Morodiene (03/04/14 10:29 AM)
_________________________
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Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

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#2241271 - 03/04/14 01:11 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: bennevis]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha

I don't see why an acoustic would claim to be hard too. The hammer action escapes from the key so its stop is not felt, and the felts below the key and length of key provide the cushion. On PHAIII there is felt too below the key, but also the hammer stops without escaping the key by hitting felt, and that is felt by the fingers on the key. Hard felt, and obviously not thick enough as recognised in their marketing speak for PHAIV. Unravel the 'felts' for material and feeling in in that!

Would you care to elaborate your explanation in simple English, so that the non-technical amongst us (i.e. me, myself, yours truly grin) can understand?

Are you talking about the kickback from the hammer? Because the hammer does escape the key, and you can feel it. If the hammer is always attached to the key, it's not a hammer, it's just a lever.

As for the 'hard' bottoming-out, yes, it is when compared to other Japanese brands (Kawai and Yamaha APs & DPs). But play some European acoustic brands, and you'll find similarly firm actions. The Grotrian-Steinweg grand that I sometimes play on (and it's only a few years old) feel very similar to the PHA-III on my V-Piano.

I've also played some older acoustic grands where the (previously plushy) felt beneath the most used keys in the middle have worn/flattened down, and it's disconcerting when the bottoming of the key action changes depending on where on the keyboard the key is.

If you can still find a shop in the UK with one of those Roland PHAIII actions on display in a clear plastic case, take a look. The hammer does not escape the key when struck. Sure it's a separate lever, but press the key to the bottom and decide for yourself why the key cannot go further. Is it the key bed or the hammer? This is not how it is on an acoustic.

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#2241294 - 03/04/14 01:55 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha

If you can still find a shop in the UK with one of those Roland PHAIII actions on display in a clear plastic case, take a look. The hammer does not escape the key when struck. Sure it's a separate lever, but press the key to the bottom and decide for yourself why the key cannot go further. Is it the key bed or the hammer? This is not how it is on an acoustic.

I have, and am pretty sure that the hammer is not attached to the key itself.

Look at this video, starting from 0:38 (this is PHA-II - I can't find one for PHA-III). The hammer seems attached to the key, because the key stroke is gentle, but notice how the hammer's head (i.e. distal end) bounces when released, yet the key itself is still. If you jerk the key (on a PHA-III) down sharply but stop it abruptly before it hits the bottom, you can feel the hammer kicking back a microsecond later, on its return. The fact that the key bottom rests on the proximal end of the hammer is irrelevant to how hard the key bottoms out - if Roland wanted to, they could have used thicker/softer felt underneath, when the bottoming would feel as mushy as you like.

http://youtu.be/y-yQO0sD6SQ
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2241377 - 03/04/14 04:32 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
I think we're talking at cross purposes. I agree the hammer is not attached to the key, but it does not escape from the key lever in the same way as on an acoustic. It might disconnect under its own inertia, that's all. In fact that's another potential for injury, the weight on falling back pushes back on the finger which might still be depressing the key. You can hold the key close to the bottom, and feel the hammer weight, after playing the note, the YT video even shows that (it is held in position against the felt or where a string would be). On an acoustic, the hammer escapes but is caught and the double escapement allows you to play repetitive notes but only partially lifting the key to re-engage the hammer and that's what you feel.

The escapement advertised by Roland for DP s, is that simulated feel by a rubber notch or protrusion between hammer and key. That's all. Similar thing for Yamaha and Kawai.


Edited by spanishbuddha (03/04/14 04:33 PM)

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#2241426 - 03/04/14 06:22 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
I think we're talking at cross purposes. I agree the hammer is not attached to the key, but it does not escape from the key lever in the same way as on an acoustic. It might disconnect under its own inertia, that's all. In fact that's another potential for injury, the weight on falling back pushes back on the finger which might still be depressing the key.

Everything has the potential to cause injury, it seems. grin

I really don't know what you're getting at. The acoustic action also 'pushes back' on the finger when the hammer falls back. And yes, you can feel that too. Try it out on any acoustic grand for yourself.

http://youtu.be/9dEOqU_Y-4A (from 3:48)

Watch in slow motion what happens to the key (at the bottom) when the hammer falls back. Don't forget, there's a human finger out of sight "which might still be depressing the key".....
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2241631 - 03/05/14 12:20 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: bennevis]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
Originally Posted By: bennevis


I really don't know what you're getting at. The acoustic action also 'pushes back' on the finger when the hammer falls back. And yes, you can feel that too. Try it out on any acoustic grand for yourself.


No, the acoustic action hammer does not push back on the finger at the bottom of the keystroke until you re-engage by lifting the key past the escapement point. It's only mm but that's the difference, there's an escapement in the acoustic action, but not in a DP just the rubber feely notch.

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#2241637 - 03/05/14 12:31 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
Originally Posted By: bennevis


I really don't know what you're getting at. The acoustic action also 'pushes back' on the finger when the hammer falls back. And yes, you can feel that too. Try it out on any acoustic grand for yourself.


No, the acoustic action hammer does not push back on the finger at the bottom of the keystroke until you re-engage by lifting the key past the escapement point. It's only mm but that's the difference, there's an escapement in the acoustic action, but not in a DP just the rubber feely notch.

Did you actually watch the video and/or try it out on an acoustic?

Where do you think the hammer lands back on?
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2241653 - 03/05/14 12:59 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: bennevis]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
Originally Posted By: bennevis


I really don't know what you're getting at. The acoustic action also 'pushes back' on the finger when the hammer falls back. And yes, you can feel that too. Try it out on any acoustic grand for yourself.


No, the acoustic action hammer does not push back on the finger at the bottom of the keystroke until you re-engage by lifting the key past the escapement point. It's only mm but that's the difference, there's an escapement in the acoustic action, but not in a DP just the rubber feely notch.

Did you actually watch the video and/or try it out on an acoustic?

Where do you think the hammer lands back on?

Yes I try it on an acoustic action all the time, and a DP. Answer to the question is the backcheck on an acoustic and key on a DP.

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#2241659 - 03/05/14 01:05 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
What is the backcheck attached to?
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2241667 - 03/05/14 01:15 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: bennevis]
spanishbuddha Online   content
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 2361
Loc: UK
Originally Posted By: bennevis
What is the backcheck attached to?

The key, but it's not taking the full weight of the hammer (they are aligned obliquely), and the back check is not used to propel the hammer again.

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#2241670 - 03/05/14 01:21 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
Hideki Matsui Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/19/10
Posts: 787
I'm not sure about PH3 but the PH4 action on my LX-15e is excellent. I think they added some felt. Although I really enjoy the action on the CA95, the PH4 feels like a perfectly broken-in action to me.
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#2241678 - 03/05/14 01:37 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: spanishbuddha]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5154
Originally Posted By: spanishbuddha
Originally Posted By: bennevis
What is the backcheck attached to?

The key, but it's not taking the full weight of the hammer (they are aligned obliquely), and the back check is not used to propel the hammer again.


The hammer itself is light, but it lands back squarely on the back check and the force (small as it is) is transmitted directly back to the pianist's finger. Note that the back check is attached almost at the far end of the key, well away from the fulcrum, so you could say that the force is actually magnified due to the leverage.

On the slow-motion video, you can actually see the 'jolt' on the key (on the pianist's side of the fulcrum) when the hammer falls back and lands on the backcheck.

But just like on the PHA-III, this jolt is barely noticeable, unless you're feeling out for it. (On my V, I have to grasp the key with thumb and index finger and jerk it down sharply, stopping it just before it lands on the bottom, to feel it.) But it's there nevertheless. But a cause of injury (according to yourself)? No.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2241910 - 03/05/14 09:24 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: btcomm]
Kona88 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/09/14
Posts: 5
For what it is worth, I learned long ago that I have sensitive wrists. If I play too much on a stiff grand or a simulated stiff grand (like many newer Yamaha DPs) I get internal wrist swelling which causes cold hands and hands "going to sleep". If I am careful about which keyboards I play I have little or no problems.

I do fine on a Yamaha U1 acoustic upright and also on a Roland FP4 which I have had for about 7 years. I mostly play the Roland due to living in a condo.

To my ears, the Roland FP4 sounds great. The internal speakers are minimal but through headphones or a good PA system I still really like it. I have used it on countless gigs and very extensively at home. 90% of the time I use the acoustic piano sounds but I also really like the rhodes/wurly sounds and the B3 sounds.

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#2241952 - 03/05/14 11:34 PM Re: Digital Keyboard + Sore hands/arms [Re: RaindropPrelude]
FrankDaddy Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/24/10
Posts: 68
Loc: Louisiana, US
Are you keeping your wrists up in a neutral position? chair height can cause you to drag your wrists down and not keep the forearms parallel to the floor. Your forearms and wrists should be straight and parallel to the floor. Have you talked to your teacher about this. they may be able to recommend some stretches you can do before you start playing. I agree with the bottoming out of the Roland keyboard. But I would first talk to your teacher to check your posture at your Roland. someone mentioned using a camera to take some video. I would show the video to your teacher. Posture is everything for piano. Actions that bottom out do make it worse. But first rule out your posture, chair height, wrist and forearm position before you could really injure yourself.

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