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#2242881 - 03/07/14 09:10 PM I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER H*E*L*L....
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 878
...I broke a string on a customer's Strohber upright, the string sharing B7/C8, and since I still haven't bought a reel of wire, or spares, I just uncoiled the side that didn't break, and re-wound it, ended up with about 1.5 turns on each pin instead of 3.

I'm gonna burn in H*E*L*L, right?

But it seemed to hold a tune, at least while I was there.

You guys told me you have reels of piano wire. Are the un-wrapped treble strings mostly the same gauge? They appear to be. Is the treble gauge standardized for uprights, or do you have to measure with digital calipers to get the exact gauge every time? If I were to buy only 2-3 reels to start off with, what would you all recommend for the most common un-wrapped, bare string gauge?

I also brought my heat gun, and used it to straighten out hammers that were missing strings.

I guess I'll burn in H*E*L*L, twice.

grin


Edited by Paul678 (03/07/14 09:13 PM)

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#2242884 - 03/07/14 09:16 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
beethoven986 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/20/09
Posts: 3371
No offense, but if you have to ask these questions, you are not ready to be tuning for other people. No, the wires are not the same gauge. You need to use a micrometer. And no, what you did with the coils is not acceptable.
_________________________
B.Mus. Piano Performance 2009
M.Mus. Piano Performance & Literature 2011
PTG Associate Member
Certified Dampp-Chaser installer

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#2242931 - 03/07/14 10:39 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Mark Cerisano, RPT Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/24/10
Posts: 1494
Loc: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
I disagree. Unwinding a string from one pin and moving it down around the hitch pitch, straightening out the hitch pin bend and creating a new one so you have some extra wire to wrap around the next pin is totally acceptable on an old piano.

The gauge is the same, the string has already settled, it is a faster repair, and it looks better.

If strings are breaking because they are old, then they are all old. Replacing with a new string is not as good a repair because: the new string will go out of tune right away, it will look out of place, the tone may be different, and the hammer mating will be off.

However, if it is a newer piano and the string broke because of heavy playing then a new string is best. But if course, it would have broke at the v-bar anyway.

Get a set of 12 and 13 gauge piano wire to start. Those are usually the thinnest top treble strings.

Gauge = (Diameter in 1/1000ths of an inch - 5) / 2

Example:
Measured diameter = 0.037"
Gauge = (37 - 5) / 2
= 16

Gauge 12 = 12 x 2 + 5
= 0.029"

Hope that helps.

IMHO, There are two acceptable paths to becoming a competent technician. One, extended education and practice to become proficient (the German apprentice model, for example) and two, learning on the job with appropriate customers and pianos. As long as you don't over represent yourself, the second method can be quite acceptable.
_________________________
Mark Cerisano, RPT
www.howtotunepianos.com

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#2242933 - 03/07/14 10:40 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Mark Cerisano, RPT Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/24/10
Posts: 1494
Loc: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
I didn't understand the hammer thing you did. What was the problem?
_________________________
Mark Cerisano, RPT
www.howtotunepianos.com

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#2242938 - 03/07/14 10:49 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Emmery Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 2481
Loc: Niagara Region, On. Canada
Paul, there is the piano tech side of me which wants to say the same thing beethoven mentioned, but I believe you came on here in good faith looking for info to help you out of a pickle. No sense in throwing salt into a wound.

If you already have a digital caliper, you may be able to utilize it to get the right gage, but in all honesty, a micrometer is a more sure thing. As a general machinist, we never relied on a caliper for +/- .001" measurements or less, but after many many years and familiarity with the caliper one can get reasonably close with a good quality one.
These days you can pick up a chinese miclometer from HFT for 30-40$ so its not going to kill ya to get the right tool. It works for center pins and tuning pins also.

That said, if you are out there tuning, you should have access to the entire set of plain strings you will need. I will send you a PM indicating what and where to get it since its frowned upon to post links of non-sponsors in open here. It is also a good idea to have a universal bass string set at your disposal, and also a connection with a bass string manufacturer. One can break one of these also. I'm not big on the universals since they often sound worse than bagpipes on a hangover but they can save your butt in the right circumstances.

Hopefully you understand the difference between a hammer tht is travelling improperly as opposed to aligned improperly. I rarely use my shank heating pliers (same principle) but if I do, it is usually to square up the hammer to the string and to fit more parallel to its neighbouring hammers. There are other adjustments which can take care of hitting all the strings or getting a square straight travel.



Edited by Emmery (03/07/14 11:00 PM)
_________________________
Piano Technician
George Brown College /85
Niagara Region

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#2242940 - 03/07/14 10:56 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Emmery]
Spot Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/21/13
Posts: 118
Loc: Australia
Hi Emmery,

Would you be able to send me a similar pm please?

Ben
_________________________
Trainee tuner/technician

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#2242941 - 03/07/14 11:03 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21926
Loc: Oakland
The thinnest wire gauge in most pianos is #13. The strings which are most likely to break have gauges 13 through 16 by half-sizes, i.e. 13, 13-1/2, 14, 14-1/2 etc., but eventually, you should have 12 through 20 by half gauges, plus 21 and 22.
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Semipro Tech

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#2242944 - 03/07/14 11:05 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Emmery Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 2481
Loc: Niagara Region, On. Canada
NP Ben.
_________________________
Piano Technician
George Brown College /85
Niagara Region

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#2242963 - 03/08/14 12:01 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Mark Cerisano, RPT]
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 878
Originally Posted By: Mark Cerisano, RPT
I disagree. Unwinding a string from one pin and moving it down around the hitch pitch, straightening out the hitch pin bend and creating a new one so you have some extra wire to wrap around the next pin is totally acceptable on an old piano.

The gauge is the same, the string has already settled, it is a faster repair, and it looks better.

If strings are breaking because they are old, then they are all old. Replacing with a new string is not as good a repair because: the new string will go out of tune right away, it will look out of place, the tone may be different, and the hammer mating will be off.

However, if it is a newer piano and the string broke because of heavy playing then a new string is best. But if course, it would have broke at the v-bar anyway.

Get a set of 12 and 13 gauge piano wire to start. Those are usually the thinnest top treble strings.

Gauge = (Diameter in 1/1000ths of an inch - 5) / 2

Example:
Measured diameter = 0.037"
Gauge = (37 - 5) / 2
= 16

Gauge 12 = 12 x 2 + 5
= 0.029"

Hope that helps.

IMHO, There are two acceptable paths to becoming a competent technician. One, extended education and practice to become proficient (the German apprentice model, for example) and two, learning on the job with appropriate customers and pianos. As long as you don't over represent yourself, the second method can be quite acceptable.


Thanks Mark. I really appreciate your helpful
attitude. I've seen your videos before, but I will
take another look at them again. Although I'm aware
you're supposed to keep 3 turns on the pins, I figured
the worst that could happen, is the two highest notes
would fall out of tune, and I would have to replace the string on another visit.

What you wrote was on page 96 of Reblitz.

I performed the heat-gun hammer to correct crooked
hammers:

http://www.raglandpiano.com/recondition2.htm

Some people here didn't accept this as a solution, but
it has worked for me many times. I'm aware that you
really should file off the string grooves once you reposition the hammer, but I felt it was enough in this case to just get the hammer to hit all the strings.

BTW, this piano was for the couples' grand-daughter visiting, so it's not like it was for Glen Gould at Carnegie Hall!!

This piano had real ivories, and was quite old, according to the owner, who had it in his childhood.

Thanks again.


Edited by Paul678 (03/08/14 12:05 AM)

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#2242972 - 03/08/14 01:17 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: BDB]
phantomFive Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/11/14
Posts: 1788
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: BDB
The thinnest wire gauge in most pianos is #13. The strings which are most likely to break have gauges 13 through 16 by half-sizes, i.e. 13, 13-1/2, 14, 14-1/2 etc., but eventually, you should have 12 through 20 by half gauges, plus 21 and 22.

This fascinates me because as a piano player, all the strings I've broken have been bass strings.
_________________________
Poetry is rhythm.

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#2242978 - 03/08/14 01:51 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21926
Loc: Oakland
Bass strings have different physics, and replacing them is a different situation.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

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#2243023 - 03/08/14 07:40 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER H*E*L*L.... [Re: Paul678]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1847
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Good points all.

Unless I've missed it, no one is really defining what is meant by "old" piano wire. Really old wire is generally not amenable to being straightened out and rewound. For example, if this is a ca.1920 Smith & Barnes Strohber, then the wire could just as easily break again with repositioning around the hitch pin and unwinding/new becket/rewinding/ with the tuning pins. Given the circumstances you exercised the only option short of ordering new wire and another service call. You are fortunate that it worked. (Splicing would be tricky too and a big waste of time if it doesn't work.) In the field you need on hand a full compliment (all sizes including half-sizes) of reels (preferably with brakes). I used a digital micrometer. In rare cases I found a caliper helpful. It doesn't hurt to have one. Also, you should have a complete set of universal bass strings for temporary situations. However, universals do not work in every situation, even temporary. And so, it pays to be prepared for this as well, but you're probably not at that point yet.


Edited by bkw58 (03/08/14 08:15 AM)
Edit Reason: clarity
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com

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#2243032 - 03/08/14 08:24 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: phantomFive]
Emmery Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 2481
Loc: Niagara Region, On. Canada
Originally Posted By: phantomFive
Originally Posted By: BDB
The thinnest wire gauge in most pianos is #13. The strings which are most likely to break have gauges 13 through 16 by half-sizes, i.e. 13, 13-1/2, 14, 14-1/2 etc., but eventually, you should have 12 through 20 by half gauges, plus 21 and 22.

This fascinates me because as a piano player, all the strings I've broken have been bass strings.


Bass strings are typically struck with heavier hammers and take more abuse because the force goes across 1 or two strings instead of the more common 3 in a unison farther up.

Some older pianos have some awkward scaling on them also where the tensions get extremely high in some of the bass strings. I remember having to splice a bass string years ago in an emergency at a concert. The splice wire was the the largest diameter wire I carried at the time, yet it broke twice before getting up to tension. I believe it was #24 ASW which is .055" and the original core wire measured about .064" which would be about #26 I believe.

I ended up saving some old thick core wire from older pianos after that just for these splicing instances and also purchased a coil of "industrial" music wire in #26. This wire is galvanized on its outer surface and not pretty, but for splices on the non speaking length it will outlast anything else I've used. Personally, I find wire thicker than #26 is a near impossible PITA to work with and bend for splicing with normal field tools. Also, if I'm not mistaken, we begin to reach the size limit for the becket hole on most pianos near the 1/16" mark.


Edited by Emmery (03/08/14 10:38 AM)
_________________________
Piano Technician
George Brown College /85
Niagara Region

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#2243047 - 03/08/14 09:19 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Silverwood Pianos Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/10/08
Posts: 4234
Loc: Vancouver B. C. Canada

1/3 lb of treble wire with or w/o the brake can be found at piano supply houses for less than ten dollars per…

Emmery I have some old 26 wire and will try that for bass strings, thanks.
_________________________
Dan Silverwood
www.silverwoodpianos.com
http://silverwoodpianos.blogspot.com/
http://www.facebook.com/SilverwoodPianosDotCom
"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

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#2243201 - 03/08/14 02:16 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
David Boyce Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 293
Loc: Scotland
On Wednesday a private school (whose new head of music is a client of mine and I know also from other schools) phoned to ask if I could come the following day to check a sticking note on their tiny "Offenbach" grand (so short as to have almost negative length...).

I hadn't done work for the school before and was eager to obilge, so went along though the time window I had available was a bit tight. The sticking note was due to a combination of tight hammer flange and weak repetition spring, easily fixed. But it turend out they wanted it tuned as well. I had just enough time left for a tuning, so that was OK. But when I finsihed I wasn't happy with F4, which had proven to be a bit false. So I tweaked it, and the string broke right at the becket. Fortunately I was able to make a new becket and still have two-and-a-bit coils. (It's allready skimpy on coils, barely three and a half, I'd say).

Paul678, I'd second Emmery's comments about getting a micrometer. If you are not yet sure how to read one, it's really not difficult, and it's a great tool to have. You can't beat it for accuracy.

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#2243220 - 03/08/14 02:52 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: David Boyce]
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 878
Originally Posted By: David Boyce
On Wednesday a private school (whose new head of music is a client of mine and I know also from other schools) phoned to ask if I could come the following day to check a sticking note on their tiny "Offenbach" grand (so short as to have almost negative length...).

I hadn't done work for the school before and was eager to obilge, so went along though the time window I had available was a bit tight. The sticking note was due to a combination of tight hammer flange and weak repetition spring, easily fixed. But it turend out they wanted it tuned as well. I had just enough time left for a tuning, so that was OK. But when I finsihed I wasn't happy with F4, which had proven to be a bit false. So I tweaked it, and the string broke right at the becket. Fortunately I was able to make a new becket and still have two-and-a-bit coils. (It's allready skimpy on coils, barely three and a half, I'd say).

Paul678, I'd second Emmery's comments about getting a micrometer. If you are not yet sure how to read one, it's really not difficult, and it's a great tool to have. You can't beat it for accuracy.


Yes, I have a good pair of digital calipers.

I'll probably get this set to start off:

http://www.howardpianoindustries.com/piano-music-wire-assortment-various-sizes/

And 10 feet replacements:

http://www.howardpianoindustries.com/piano-music-wire-in-10-lengths/

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#2243246 - 03/08/14 03:43 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Silverwood Pianos Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/10/08
Posts: 4234
Loc: Vancouver B. C. Canada


Originally Posted By: Paul678
Yes, I have a good pair of digital calipers.


We all do. But for measuring piano wire accurately you need a digital or manual micrometer. The manual ones are less than 30 bucks.

Otherwise you will go from piano tuning h e l l to piano tuning purgatory. Not the place you want to be around here…...
_________________________
Dan Silverwood
www.silverwoodpianos.com
http://silverwoodpianos.blogspot.com/
http://www.facebook.com/SilverwoodPianosDotCom
"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

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#2243277 - 03/08/14 04:58 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Silverwood Pianos]
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 878
Originally Posted By: Silverwood Pianos


Originally Posted By: Paul678
Yes, I have a good pair of digital calipers.


We all do. But for measuring piano wire accurately you need a digital or manual micrometer. The manual ones are less than 30 bucks.

Otherwise you will go from piano tuning h e l l to piano tuning purgatory. Not the place you want to be around here…...



Oh, you mean like this one:

http://www.harborfreight.com/digital-micrometer-68305.html#.UxuRNz-wJ4c

Accurate to 0.0001", it claims.

@*!@#! YOU MEAN I GOTTA SPEND MORE MONEY???!!

!?@!$#! THIS ALREADY IS PIANO TUNING H E L L!!

mad

grin


Edited by Paul678 (03/08/14 04:59 PM)

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#2243281 - 03/08/14 05:05 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
BenP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 166
Loc: South Jersey
Originally Posted By: Paul678


Yes, like that. Although here is a non-digital version of the same thing on the same site. This is what I use, and it works fine.

http://www.harborfreight.com/0-to-1-inch-range-digital-micrometer-895.html#.UxuS84Uqj2g

I think the bottom line in these threads you have started is that you're getting into complex, specialized, and expensive piano work. Many are willing to help you, but don't expect to be able to do any of it quickly, easily, or cheaply when you're starting out.

I am relatively new to the trade myself, and I have found I have to prioritize both skills training and tool purchase. There are some skills and tools that I need on a daily basis, some that I need on a monthly basis, some that I've needed only once or twice ever, and some that I have never needed yet with my relatively small client base. The needs of my customers dictate the growth of my "arsenal."


Edited by BenP (03/08/14 05:07 PM)
Edit Reason: clarity
_________________________
Ben Patterson
Part-time Piano Tech
Rural South Jersey

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#2243282 - 03/08/14 05:05 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
BDB Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/03
Posts: 21926
Loc: Oakland
I suggest you read this. Read the entire topic.
_________________________
Semipro Tech

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#2243374 - 03/08/14 11:26 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
bkw58 Offline

Silver Supporter until December 19, 2014


Registered: 03/14/09
Posts: 1847
Loc: Conway, AR USA
Scrimping on proper technical tools is a money loser.
_________________________
Bob W.
Retired piano technician
www.pianotechno.blogspot.com

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#2243543 - 03/09/14 10:56 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
David Boyce Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 293
Loc: Scotland
I agree that it's not necessary to have a digital micrometer - an ordinary one is fine, and it doesn't take long to learn how to read one.

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#2243590 - 03/09/14 12:48 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
OperaTenor Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/13/06
Posts: 2468
Loc: Sandy Eggo, California
I have an analog micrometer and I'm not afraid to use it...

(I also have a string gauge...)
_________________________
Happiness is a freshly tuned piano.
Jim Boydston, proprietor, No Piano Left Behind - technician
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#2243676 - 03/09/14 02:43 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: BenP]
Emmery Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 2481
Loc: Niagara Region, On. Canada
Originally Posted By: BenP
Originally Posted By: Paul678


Yes, like that. Although here is a non-digital version of the same thing on the same site. This is what I use, and it works fine.

http://www.harborfreight.com/0-to-1-inch-range-digital-micrometer-895.html#.UxuS84Uqj2g

I think the bottom line in these threads you have started is that you're getting into complex, specialized, and expensive piano work. Many are willing to help you, but don't expect to be able to do any of it quickly, easily, or cheaply when you're starting out.

I am relatively new to the trade myself, and I have found I have to prioritize both skills training and tool purchase. There are some skills and tools that I need on a daily basis, some that I need on a monthly basis, some that I've needed only once or twice ever, and some that I have never needed yet with my relatively small client base. The needs of my customers dictate the growth of my "arsenal."


Take that "accuracy" claim for the micrometer with an incredibly big grain of salt. The specmanship which chinese manufacturers apply to their products is sometimes borderline criminal. The micrometer has a "resolution" of .0001". Its accuracy however, is entirely related to how true the two anvils are on the mike, and also how true the spindle thread axis is to the anvil, and also how much play there is on the thread pitch diameters and how well it can be adjusted out with the internal adjusting ring. You are not going to get +/- .0001" accuracy and repeatability out of a micrometer selling for this price. It certainly is capable of measuring wire for our purposes, in spite of this embellishment of its performance.

One of the biggest advantages of the micrometer over the caliper is that you can utilize the friction thimble on it (sometimes they ratchet clik also). This feature allows consistant measuring pressure; the variation in how much pressure you put on the measuring surfaces is the main cause of innacuracy with this tool FWIW.


Edited by Emmery (03/09/14 02:47 PM)
_________________________
Piano Technician
George Brown College /85
Niagara Region

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#2243677 - 03/09/14 02:44 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
SMHaley Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/06/13
Posts: 860
Loc: Seattle
Having been involved in many intense discussions with Paul678, as have others, its almost surprising there isn't an "I told you so." Well done everyone not jumping all over it. I'm sure the mods are proud. I really hope Paul isn't taking money from these folks.
_________________________
AA Music Arts 2001, BM 2005
Pipe Organ Builder
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#2243692 - 03/09/14 03:04 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: SMHaley]
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 878
Originally Posted By: SMHaley
Having been involved in many intense discussions with Paul678, as have others, its almost surprising there isn't an "I told you so." Well done everyone not jumping all over it. I'm sure the mods are proud. I really hope Paul isn't taking money from these folks.


I made $90 on this last job.

And the piano sounded good after I was done!

Tunelab Pro is an AWESOME program!


Edited by BB Player (03/09/14 05:32 PM)
Edit Reason: profanity deleted

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#2243861 - 03/09/14 08:13 PM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
BenP Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/16/12
Posts: 166
Loc: South Jersey
Originally Posted By: Emmery
The variation in how much pressure you put on the measuring surfaces is the main cause of innacuracy with this tool FWIW.


Excellent point. I didn't know it was called a friction thimble (makes sense), but I certainly discovered very early on with the micrometer that measurements could vary significantly without using that.

Originally Posted By: Paul678
I made $90 on this last job.

And the piano sounded good after I was done!

Tunelab Pro is an AWESOME program!


Be very careful what you charge for. Charging customers for work that you are not experienced with or qualified to do, besides being unethical, will come back to bite you.
_________________________
Ben Patterson
Part-time Piano Tech
Rural South Jersey

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#2244043 - 03/10/14 04:21 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
Mark R. Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/31/09
Posts: 2069
Loc: Pretoria, South Africa
Originally Posted By: Paul678
Originally Posted By: SMHaley
Having been involved in many intense discussions with Paul678, as have others, its almost surprising there isn't an "I told you so." Well done everyone not jumping all over it. I'm sure the mods are proud. I really hope Paul isn't taking money from these folks.


I made $90 on this last job.

And the piano sounded good after I was done!

Tunelab Pro is an AWESOME program!


Paul,

As as fellow beginner, I'd give you this piece of (unsolicited) advice: if you want to get friendly and constructive help from the techs on this forum,
... rather than flaunting your earnings (whether they be justified or not), show a willingness to learn
... rather than flaunting how good your work was, focus on the room for improvement (because there always is some).

Please keep it modest - if not for your own sake, then at least do it for the rest of us, who visit this forum to learn from the professionals.
_________________________
Autodidact interested in piano technology.
LinkedIn profile
1922 49" Zimmermann, project piano.
1970 44" Ibach, daily music maker.

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#2244132 - 03/10/14 09:04 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: Paul678]
UnrightTooner Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/08
Posts: 4980
Loc: Bradford County, PA
Originally Posted By: Paul678
...I broke a string on a customer's Strohber upright, the string sharing B7/C8, and since I still haven't bought a reel of wire, or spares, I just uncoiled the side that didn't break, and re-wound it, ended up with about 1.5 turns on each pin instead of 3.

I'm gonna burn in H*E*L*L, right?

But it seemed to hold a tune, at least while I was there.

You guys told me you have reels of piano wire. Are the un-wrapped treble strings mostly the same gauge? They appear to be. Is the treble gauge standardized for uprights, or do you have to measure with digital calipers to get the exact gauge every time? If I were to buy only 2-3 reels to start off with, what would you all recommend for the most common un-wrapped, bare string gauge?

I also brought my heat gun, and used it to straighten out hammers that were missing strings.

I guess I'll burn in H*E*L*L, twice.

grin


At St. Reblitz's ivory gate wink there will be two doors with signs on them. One will say "For tuners who think they have always done the right thing and deserve to Eternally work on the finest pianos in blissful satisfaction." The other door will say "For tuners who know they have not always done the right thing and deserve to Eternally work on the worst pianos in degrading frustation."

Choose wisely, the doors may not lead where you expect them to!
_________________________
Jeff Deutschle
Part-Time Tuner
Who taught the first chicken how to peck?

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#2244149 - 03/10/14 09:37 AM Re: I'M GOING TO PIANO TUNER heck.... [Re: UnrightTooner]
Silverwood Pianos Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/10/08
Posts: 4234
Loc: Vancouver B. C. Canada
Perhaps a copy of Chris Gudgeon and "Sugar" Ray Carboyle’s book is required.

A Demotivational Guide
_________________________
Dan Silverwood
www.silverwoodpianos.com
http://silverwoodpianos.blogspot.com/
http://www.facebook.com/SilverwoodPianosDotCom
"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

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