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#2249916 - 03/21/14 11:23 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: landorrano]
BostonTeacher Offline
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Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Originally Posted By: landorrano
Good morning. This is such an interesting topic, unfortunately I don't have time this morning to flesh out my thoughts on the matter but I do want to say that I have taken the opposite direction from you, BostonTeacher. I moved to Europe from the US as an adult. Learning solfège has been like a revelation for me, like finally realising what it means to read music. I encourage you to continue as best as you can to relate your teaching in Beantown to your European musical formation, it represents an incredible enrichment for the students who have you as the professeur, they are quite lucky, even if they don't realize it.


Thank you very much for your encouragement landorrano. The world is so small. Here we are , from all parts of the planet talking about solfege and what it means to us. I don't have much time either but I'l post this quickly.
Thinking about solfege brings back memories from my childhood. I was atypical as a kid because I loved solfege. Most children hated it.Perhaps because it was my father who first taught me I got to spend more time with him doing something special but I'm not sure it was that or that I loved singing. He was a pretty good teacher actually but he didn't teach me the intervals. He played the solfege lessons on the violin and I just followed the melodies by ear. Later though,I started solfege with a teacher and I went through the 5 years. We used Danhauser book and the lessons were a bit boring. I remember when I took the conservatory exams, I was a bit older when I started taking exams, that there were children crying. They were so scared singing in front of what we called the "tribunal" .. I felt bad for them. In any case, I'm told nowadays it has changed a lot. I think if I start teaching solfege it has to be a different method. I would be curious to know what method do you use?


Edited by BostonTeacher (03/21/14 11:23 AM)

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#2249923 - 03/21/14 11:33 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: Saranoya]
BostonTeacher Offline
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Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Saranoya,
You remind me of myself when I was in my 6th year of piano. I heard a recording of Horowitz playing Rachmaninoff's prelude in g minor and I loved it so much that I got the score and tried to play it. I could read the notes but I could not play it. ha
Perhaps finding scores that are no too easy nor too difficult would be a good thing for you. Even if you are there mentally your body is telling you "nope" so you have to listen to your body and give it more time, do the steps in between.
It happens to me all the time. I need to be patient and don't give up if something doesn't happen right away. It will eventually happen if we don't give up. There is no other way around it.
I don't have good memory so I need to understand what's happening in the music in order to memorize it. Either this or saying the note names out loud, separate hands. This is what one of my teachers made me to do to memorize pieces and this is why after 10 years I can still sing them by heart. We always go back to the singing. It must be very powerful because they say people with alzheimer loose memory but they can still sing songs by heart.

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#2249953 - 03/21/14 12:47 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
keystring Online   content
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The ability to sing what I saw lost its effectivess when the music became atonal, and when the music consisted primarily of constantly changing chords creating a kaleidoscope of harmony. Otoh, being able to relate a note on the page with a location on the instrument and also a feel in the hands, served me well every time. One of the pieces I work on is Debussy's Feuilles mortes. I can hear it in my head. The chords have a texture because of the combined sound of their notes. I would not be able to sing what I hear, because I cannot create multiple sounds with my voice.

The ability to sing what I saw also left me with a deficit in recognizing register. I could easily play an octave too high or too low and not notice it, because when you sing, you have to shift toward the range of your voice. You learn to discount register so that all C's are the same. But in fact, we must hear the difference and not just the sameness, or at least know how to reach in the right spot.

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#2250037 - 03/21/14 03:54 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
BostonTeacher Offline
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Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
During my bachelors I took a class in atonal solfege and we did sing. Instead of note names we sung "nah-nah" The book is called Modus Novus. I even took a class in microtonal ear training later on. I wasn't very good at it but some classmates could sing microtones very well. In another class, in order to recognize harmony a teacher made us sing each individual note of the chord from bottom to top, left to right. First I thought it was a loss of time but after a while I started noticing how my aural skills started improving considerably. We didn't sing solfege, we sang scale degree numbers. Somehow if you can sing it, you can hear it and the sounds in your mind become more lively. I don't think it is a requirement but I've noticed how singing makes the process of reading, listening, and playing less cerebral and more intuitive which is a good thing in my book.
I'm an ear trainer nerd though. I even have an app in my phone to practice if I'm stuck in traffic. It's called Ear Trainer.
Have a good day. It's Friday already !

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#2250038 - 03/21/14 03:57 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: laguna_greg]
BostonTeacher Offline
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Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Originally Posted By: laguna_greg
Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher

Is it difficult to "convince" them or they actually come to you because of your approach?


The beginners don't know enough to ask any of the right questions, nor do their parents usually if they are young. So I just tell them that this is how it's going to be, take it or leave it. I've had a few people who had some hesitation at the beginning because of lessons they had earlier in their lives with other teachers. If they can hear it, I point out to them that they don't know enough yet to form an opinion, and they'll have to trust me for a little while to see the results. I'm simply not interested in teaching any other method, so they can look for another teacher if they really don't want to do it my way.

Yes, that makes sense. So far I have kept my approach neutral when I advertise my lessons in order to reach as many students as possible but I'm starting to realize I don't have to worry about narrowing it down because in the end it all works out. Luckily for us, there is always people interested in learning to play piano. heart


Edited by BostonTeacher (03/21/14 03:59 PM)

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#2250083 - 03/21/14 05:50 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
landorrano Offline
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Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2457
Loc: France
Good evening Boston Teacher.

Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher
I would be curious to know what method do you use?


I should mention that I am not a music teacher. However, judging by your post, you've been living in the States for quite some time. It seems to me that the teaching of solfège has changed a great deal. In France in fact, at elementary levels they don't say solfège class anymore, they say "Formation musicale", music training, and it appears to me that it is the case in Spain, it Italy as well. There is a great choice of teaching materials, and there is a stream of new things coming out all of the time. I know only a small part of this material, but I am very impressed by the will of music educators to find ways pass their knowledge on to youngsters.

Dannhauser is still there, though. Personally, I love the Solfège des solfèges. I've used it a great deal myself, and I've used it with my kids as a complement to the material that they've been given in their "formation musicale" classes. There can be no doubt, though, that Dannhauser is "old school".

One series that I like a great deal is by Ireneu Segarra, called "Llenguatge Musical", Musical Language. It is written in Catalan and uses a lot of Catalan and Spanish folksongs, but I am sure that you would find it very interesting to see the way he develops things starting from the most elementary level.





Edited by landorrano (03/21/14 05:54 PM)

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#2250146 - 03/21/14 07:59 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: landorrano]
BostonTeacher Offline
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Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Originally Posted By: landorrano


One series that I like a great deal is by Ireneu Segarra, called "Llenguatge Musical", Musical Language. It is written in Catalan and uses a lot of Catalan and Spanish folksongs, but I am sure that you would find it very interesting to see the way he develops things starting from the most elementary level.




I know this method very well because I used it ! (I'm Catalan of origin) This method is a mixture of Kodaly , Dalcroze, and Orff adapted to the Catalan folk song repertoire.

I have been looking at the Yamaha Piano School . Their teaching integrates singing and solfege.

Rather than solfege, perhaps Kodaly is the best.

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#2250161 - 03/21/14 08:27 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
laguna_greg Offline
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Registered: 04/02/13
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Loc: guess where in CA and WA
Boston,

Can you get copies of that method here in the US? I'd very much like to read it.
_________________________
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#2250170 - 03/21/14 08:54 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
riley80 Offline
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Registered: 08/03/08
Posts: 380
Loc: Florida
I was brought up on the solfege system, starting in first grade.
I started piano lessons 2 years later, and of course, learned the note letters. To this DAY, I still think in movable do - if I hear a tune and need to jot it down real fast, it's
m m m d, r r r t (apologies to Ludwig).

In a choral group, my music is noted with the solfege system on tough passages. If my choir is learning something, I am liable to explain it in solfege terms.

I'd be lost without it the movable do - fixed would slay me.

As a teacher, I think you'd be wise to stick to letter names, and for the sharper student, explain the solfege system too after a year or two.

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#2250316 - 03/22/14 04:06 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
landorrano Offline
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Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2457
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher
I'm Catalan of origin




Doncs benviguts al forum, amic meu !!! Veus, la multiplicitat des cultures i llengues es un riquesa a mai desvalorar!

In fact, when you wrote about kids crying during exams, I suspected that there might be something Iberic in your origins ... although I am not so sure that it wasn't similar in France or other countries in those days.

Just to be clear, and in response to a comment in Riley80's post, I am not suggesting that you should make your students do solfège. But I do believe very firmly that the european solfègic formation is a very important musical capital, to be cultivated and passed along as best as one can. This way of bringing everything back to the voice and of considering reading music as a subject in itself is very important, very rich. As I said earlier, it is a great chance for the kids who happen into your studio. Of course you will use this capital in your teaching in Boston in the way that you judge best.

In any case I felicitate you for posing this problem for yourself.

Que vagi bé!

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#2250444 - 03/22/14 11:57 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
dumdumdiddle Offline
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Registered: 09/16/06
Posts: 1264
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher
I have been looking at the Yamaha Piano School . Their teaching integrates singing and solfege.


If you're looking at the Yamaha program, consider also the Harmony Road course.
www.harmonyroadmusic.com

Both programs are group piano-based programs; the curriculum is not designed to be used in private lessons. Lots of singing, rhythm ensembles, ear training, and the parent participates as well. I taught Yamaha in the 80's and now teach HR. There are over 100 locations in the US.
_________________________
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#2250972 - 03/23/14 01:28 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: laguna_greg]
BostonTeacher Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Originally Posted By: laguna_greg
Boston,

Can you get copies of that method here in the US? I'd very much like to read it.


Hi Greg,
I don't think the book is available through any store because it hasn't been translated. I googled it though and I found it is available in google books:
http://books.google.com/books/about/El_Meu_llibre_de_m%C3%BAsica.html?id=6e4fBPjzgogC

It's in Catalan though !

In the past I have used the two volumes of Kodaly method book called Sound Thinking by Philip Tacka and Micheal Houlahan. It has similar exercises as Ireneu Segarra but the songs are from the North-American popular repertoire. It's very well explained.


Edited by BostonTeacher (03/23/14 01:30 PM)

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#2250983 - 03/23/14 01:40 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: landorrano]
BostonTeacher Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Originally Posted By: landorrano


Just to be clear, and in response to a comment in Riley80's post, I am not suggesting that you should make your students do solfège. But I do believe very firmly that the european solfègic formation is a very important musical capital, to be cultivated and passed along as best as one can. This way of bringing everything back to the voice and of considering reading music as a subject in itself is very important, very rich. As I said earlier, it is a great chance for the kids who happen into your studio. Of course you will use this capital in your teaching in Boston in the way that you judge best.



Beautifully written ! Can I hire you to write my school marketing ? heart

Originally Posted By: landorrano

Doncs benviguts al forum, amic meu !!! Veus, la multiplicitat des cultures i llengues es un riquesa a mai desvalorar!


wow
Em pensava que parlaves frances i no catala !

Originally Posted By: landorrano

In fact, when you wrote about kids crying during exams, I suspected that there might be something Iberic in your origins ... although I am not so sure that it wasn't similar in France or other countries in those days.

This is very funny. I heard all the stereotypes but not this one !


Edited by BostonTeacher (03/23/14 01:57 PM)

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#2250984 - 03/23/14 01:42 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: dumdumdiddle]
BostonTeacher Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Originally Posted By: dumdumdiddle
Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher
I have been looking at the Yamaha Piano School . Their teaching integrates singing and solfege.


If you're looking at the Yamaha program, consider also the Harmony Road course.
www.harmonyroadmusic.com

Both programs are group piano-based programs; the curriculum is not designed to be used in private lessons. Lots of singing, rhythm ensembles, ear training, and the parent participates as well. I taught Yamaha in the 80's and now teach HR. There are over 100 locations in the US.


Thank you so much for letting me know. I will definitely look into it !

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#2250996 - 03/23/14 01:58 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: landorrano]
BostonTeacher Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Landorrano,
I thought you would enjoy this quote:
"Teach music and singing at school in such a way that it is not a torture but a joy for the pupil;instill a thirst for finer music in him, a thirst which will last for a lifetime. Music must not be approached from its intellectual, rational side, nor should it be conveyed to the child as a system of algebraic symbols, or as the secret writing of a language with which he has no connection...Often a single experience will open the young soul to music for a life time. This experience cannot be left to chance, it is the duty of the school to provide it."
Kodaly , Selected Writings.

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#2251008 - 03/23/14 02:38 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: landorrano]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11647
Loc: Canada
Just a note for accuracy
Originally Posted By: landorrano

But I do believe very firmly that the european solfègic formation is a very important musical capital, to be cultivated and passed along as best as one can.

I do not believe that this is done across all of Europe. I suspect that it's done in some countries in Europe and that there may also be differences. When it's Kodaly, is that still fixed Do, or is that movable Do? In countries that use movable fixed Do because of language (what the notes happen to be called) do all those countries follow that tradition? Etc.


Edited by keystring (03/23/14 05:15 PM)
Edit Reason: fixed error

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#2251090 - 03/23/14 05:53 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
BostonTeacher Offline
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Registered: 03/18/14
Posts: 40
Hi Keystring,
Kodaly method uses movable do but it still uses solfege sillables. Movable do and fixed do use solfege sillables too.
If I want to teach Kodaly I would have to learn it first.
The difference is that if you sing in fixed do if you are in the key of GMajor( sol Major) sol would be tonic in fixed do. In movable do sol would become do because in movable do always the first scale degree is do. This way it's easier to see the tonal tendencies.
If you are trained in fixed do switching to movable do is a headache at the beginning because you have to transpose mentally onthe spot ( you see a sol but you need to sing do ) I know some people who have done the switch and they say its worth it though .
By the way, I'm just sharing my opinions here but I'm really not an expert or I don't hold any academic position anywhere. It's just something that I've worked on in the past and now it's popping up again . I hope it doesn't seem like I'm imposing my views.
I believe that everybody needs to find their own way . This is what I have learned in America. There are many ways of doing things , not just one.

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#2251118 - 03/23/14 07:05 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11647
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher
Hi Keystring,
Kodaly method uses movable do but it still uses solfege sillables. Movable do and fixed do use solfege sillables too.
If I want to teach Kodaly I would have to learn it first.

Yes, so I remembered right. Things were starting to be mixed together, as though Europe as a whole taught the same thing, and I saw movable Do systems being mixed together with fixed Do. As long as people are aware that different things are being talked about, it's fine. smile

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#2251304 - 03/24/14 08:37 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
TimR Offline
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Registered: 08/17/04
Posts: 3187
Loc: Virginia, USA
I heard an interesting comment at a panel discussion this weekend. (I just spent three days at a trombone conference watching masterclasses, seminars, and performances).

A university professor talking about auditions for entrance to music programs said he always requires sight reading along with the usual prepared solo. He said sight reading is your true level of performance; that's where your actual level of tone production, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, etc., show.

Of course it's a bit different for a monotonic instrument like low brass, where you play one note at a time and the instrument itself limits what you can do technically. I'm not sure if his comment applies to piano much if at all. But it was a comment that caught my attention.
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#2251436 - 03/24/14 03:17 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: TimR]
Polyphonist Offline
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Registered: 03/03/13
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Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: TimR
He said sight reading is your true level of performance; that's where your actual level of tone production, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, etc., show.

Amen. It seems he knows what he's talking about.
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Polyphonist

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#2251453 - 03/24/14 03:43 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: TimR]
Gary D. Offline
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Registered: 08/30/08
Posts: 4776
Loc: South Florida
Originally Posted By: TimR
I heard an interesting comment at a panel discussion this weekend. (I just spent three days at a trombone conference watching masterclasses, seminars, and performances).

A university professor talking about auditions for entrance to music programs said he always requires sight reading along with the usual prepared solo. He said sight reading is your true level of performance; that's where your actual level of tone production, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, etc., show.

Of course it's a bit different for a monotonic instrument like low brass, where you play one note at a time and the instrument itself limits what you can do technically. I'm not sure if his comment applies to piano much if at all. But it was a comment that caught my attention.

I think sight-reading says a lot about your performance potential. It also indicates students who have over-prepared on one or two audition pieces, because even if they play very well, they will probably have problems learning new repertoire.
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#2251478 - 03/24/14 04:51 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
AZNpiano Offline
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Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5454
Loc: Orange County, CA
There are students who are super fast at sight reading new music, but they lack the discipline and/or desire to polish one or two pieces for performance. All they can do is sight reading.
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#2251500 - 03/24/14 05:17 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
Polyphonist Offline
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Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7573
Loc: New York City
I can't fathom a student like that.
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Polyphonist

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#2251548 - 03/24/14 06:56 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: AZNpiano]
Gary D. Offline
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Registered: 08/30/08
Posts: 4776
Loc: South Florida
Originally Posted By: AZNpiano
There are students who are super fast at sight reading new music, but they lack the discipline and/or desire to polish one or two pieces for performance. All they can do is sight reading.

That's a problem, but there are also many different levels of sight-reading.

The really top sight-readers come close to playing a lot of music right before polishing, and they play musically.

So it's not a black and white thing.

If someone has enough talent to play fairly well sight-reading and then won't move to the next step, that's just a kind of laziness that is beyond what we do when we teach.
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#2251780 - 03/25/14 07:24 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
Maechre Offline
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Registered: 01/01/12
Posts: 242
Loc: Melbourne, Australia
I've only read bits and pieces of this thread, but thought I'd drop in with my own thoughts. I'll be going to France at some point in my life, and will be discussing music at one point or another, so I know the differences and have considered this topic before.

It's quite simple. You teach the method that would be used in that country. So if you're in America/Australia/UK, you use letter names. If you're in France/Spain/elsewhere, use fixed do. That's not to say I wouldn't use solfège at all. I'd probably use moveable do for aural training.

I've learnt a second language, so I'm sure I can translate the different notes into solfège names.
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#2252394 - 03/26/14 12:39 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: BostonTeacher]
landorrano Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/06
Posts: 2457
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: BostonTeacher
Landorrano,
I thought you would enjoy this quote:
"Teach music and singing at school in such a way that it is not a torture but a joy for the pupil;instill a thirst for finer music in him, a thirst which will last for a lifetime. Music must not be approached from its intellectual, rational side, nor should it be conveyed to the child as a system of algebraic symbols, or as the secret writing of a language with which he has no connection...Often a single experience will open the young soul to music for a life time. This experience cannot be left to chance, it is the duty of the school to provide it."
Kodaly , Selected Writings.


Definitely an interesting comment. And a most interesting person. Kodaly said, it seems, when asked at what age the musical education of a child should be started, "at nine months before birth"!

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#2252589 - 03/26/14 05:47 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: Maechre]
Gary D. Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/30/08
Posts: 4776
Loc: South Florida
Originally Posted By: Maechre
I've only read bits and pieces of this thread, but thought I'd drop in with my own thoughts. I'll be going to France at some point in my life, and will be discussing music at one point or another, so I know the differences and have considered this topic before.

It's quite simple. You teach the method that would be used in that country. So if you're in America/Australia/UK, you use letter names. If you're in France/Spain/elsewhere, use fixed do. That's not to say I wouldn't use solfège at all. I'd probably use moveable do for aural training.

I've learnt a second language, so I'm sure I can translate the different notes into solfège names.

The only way I see a true need for letters vs do re mi is for people who want to get fast at reading letter chord notation.

I don't you are going to see "do7" instead of C7.

Other than that I have NO preference. The syllables seem much better for singing. (I don't sing, never have...)
_________________________
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#2252602 - 03/26/14 06:07 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: keystring]
Gary D. Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/30/08
Posts: 4776
Loc: South Florida
Originally Posted By: keystring
The ability to sing what I saw lost its effectivess when the music became atonal, and when the music consisted primarily of constantly changing chords creating a kaleidoscope of harmony. Otoh, being able to relate a note on the page with a location on the instrument and also a feel in the hands, served me well every time. One of the pieces I work on is Debussy's Feuilles mortes. I can hear it in my head. The chords have a texture because of the combined sound of their notes. I would not be able to sing what I hear, because I cannot create multiple sounds with my voice.

The ability to sing what I saw also left me with a deficit in recognizing register. I could easily play an octave too high or too low and not notice it, because when you sing, you have to shift toward the range of your voice. You learn to discount register so that all C's are the same. But in fact, we must hear the difference and not just the sameness, or at least know how to reach in the right spot.

I do not understand why more people do not mention the "register" problem and keep harping on singing everything when a great deal of what we play on the piano is not singable.

It's just stupid, but no one ever brings up the problem.

The object is to hear things accurately in your mind, not to drive people insane by humming all the time.
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#2252682 - 03/26/14 08:22 PM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: Gary D.]
Saranoya Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 589
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Originally Posted By: Gary D.
The object is to hear things accurately in your mind, not to drive people insane by humming all the time.


I've heard of people who do exactly that: hum constantly as they play. I even saw one perform live, once. But I can't imagine those who do that are anything other than a small minority, especially among those who play a polyphonic instrument with a range that's obviously beyond any singer's.

As you say, the object is to develop a good inner ear. Learning to read through singing rather than playing is a good way to do that, I think, because singing, more than any other way of making music, forces you to hear every note in your mind. If you can't hear it, you can't sing it. You can lack that inner ear entirely, and you'll probably still be able to play the piano passably. Assuming you know basic fingering, you'll even be able to get by, more or less, on strings or brass, although if you can't hear the difference between 440 Hz and 455 Hz (which is somewhere North of A4, but not quite A#) and correct accordingly, a teacher or roommate who does hear that difference may eventually run away screaming.

The idea behind solfège, I think, is just to get people into the habit of hearing notes internally. The singing is just a way go get there. Eventually, the singing stops, or at least it should. For pianists, it should probably stop after the first ten or so pages of the first method book, because no singer, no matter how skilled, can sing harmonies on their own. That doesn't mean it's a useless or stupid way to go about developing the inner ear.

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#2252833 - 03/27/14 03:57 AM Re: Teaching how to read music- solfege versus letter names [Re: Saranoya]
johan d Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 02/20/14
Posts: 64
Loc: Belgium
Originally Posted By: Saranoya
Learning to read through singing rather than playing is a good way to do that, I think, because singing, more than any other way of making music, forces you to hear every note in your mind. If you can't hear it, you can't sing it.



Edited by johan d (03/27/14 03:58 AM)

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