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#2260801 - 04/12/14 06:54 PM Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times
pianoloverus Offline
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Loc: New York City
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/12/arts/m....html?ref=music

I will certainly want to listen to some of his YouTube videos after a review like this. Anyone heard him live or on recordings?

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#2260831 - 04/12/14 08:25 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
bennevis Offline
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Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/12/arts/m....html?ref=music

I will certainly want to listen to some of his YouTube videos after a review like this. Anyone heard him live or on recordings?

He can be heard frequently on BBC Radio 3 in concert and on recordings.

I have to say that my opinion of him took a nose dive after hearing the way he simplified some passages of Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy (and not just the octave section). Even his teacher Alfred Brendel didn't simplify quite as much.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2260834 - 04/12/14 08:37 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
pianoloverus Offline
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Originally Posted By: bennevis
I have to say that my opinion of him took a nose dive after hearing the way he simplified some passages of Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy (and not just the octave section). Even his teacher Alfred Brendel didn't simplify quite as much.
Brendel and apparently Lewis are generally considered important Schubert pianists. I think most people are far more concerned with how much music they make then whether they simplify some passages.


Edited by pianoloverus (04/12/14 08:40 PM)

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#2261462 - 04/14/14 08:34 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
Gerard12 Offline
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Loc: South Carolina
Just on the basis of the Lewis' Beethoven recordings I have heard - which impress me as being remarkably unfussy, direct, and un-pretentious - Mr. Lewis has been on my "must see" list for some time.

(I just live too far away from the concert loop)
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Piano performance and instruction (former college music professor).

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#2261539 - 04/14/14 12:00 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
Eldridge Offline
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Registered: 01/10/14
Posts: 62
Loc: New Mexico
If he can do justice to the Brahms first, why would he need to simplify the Wanderer Fantasy?


Edited by Eldridge (04/14/14 12:05 PM)
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#2261554 - 04/14/14 12:27 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: Eldridge]
bennevis Offline
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Registered: 10/14/10
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Originally Posted By: Eldridge
If he can do justice to the Brahms first, why would he need to simplify the Wanderer Fantasy?

It begs the question - is he playing all the notes in the Brahms?

The missing notes in the Schubert are pretty obvious to anyone who has played it, or know the music well, but in the Brahms, I'd think that it's quite easy to leave out a few notes in some of the thick chords, or play some octaves as single notes, without it being obvious - especially when you have the orchestra to underpin (or mask wink ) you.

That is the problem when you've heard someone simplify a piece - does he do the same with other pieces, when it suits him? Maybe even most other pieces?

I've been listening to another UK pianist Barry Douglas, on his new CD which couples the Wanderer with D960 (where, unlike Lewis and Brendel, he plays the first movement repeat). There's absolutely no fudging there - and he doesn't even try to make things easier for himself by making an unmarked 'rhetorical' rit, as many other pianists do, for those octaves.

When you have pianists like Douglas who can play all the notes as the composer wrote them (and with great flair and panache), why would you settle for someone who (seemingly) can't?
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2261760 - 04/14/14 08:33 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
asthecrowflies Offline
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Registered: 03/11/12
Posts: 122
Loc: London, Cambridge, San Francis...
Originally Posted By: bennevis

When you have pianists like Douglas who can play all the notes as the composer wrote them (and with great flair and panache), why would you settle for someone who (seemingly) can't?


That's right, who needs interpretations from those slouches Horowitz and Rubinstein, geez. smile
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#2261764 - 04/14/14 08:43 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
pianoloverus Offline
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Originally Posted By: bennevis
When you have pianists like Douglas who can play all the notes as the composer wrote them (and with great flair and panache), why would you settle for someone who (seemingly) can't?
Alternatively, one could ask...if the pianist has something beautiful or important to say about a piece why would one care if they left out a few notes or simplified some passages?

Many people revere Cortot's recordings although many of them were error filled...perhaps even more "serious" than some simplification.

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#2261862 - 04/15/14 12:38 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
square-39 Offline
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Registered: 06/11/08
Posts: 57
I was in attendance at his performance of the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1, on April 11th, with the New York Philharmonic. In the program notes, Lewis stated "I am going to have to be thinking very seriously about the sound I make from the piano; I will have to try to step up to this Orchestra's sound."

Unfortunately, although he did play beautifully, he failed to meet his objectives. He lacked the power this piece demands and could not match the Philharmonic's strength.


Edited by square-39 (04/15/14 12:40 AM)

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#2261931 - 04/15/14 03:59 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: asthecrowflies]
bennevis Offline
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Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: asthecrowflies
Originally Posted By: bennevis

When you have pianists like Douglas who can play all the notes as the composer wrote them (and with great flair and panache), why would you settle for someone who (seemingly) can't?


That's right, who needs interpretations from those slouches Horowitz and Rubinstein, geez. smile

You (deliberately?) misunderstand my post, like a few others here.

BTW, English is my fourth language, but I do try to understand what people mean in their posts, before replying - unlike some people here.

There's a huge difference between playing wrong notes in the heat of the moment in concert (or even in studio recordings, like Cortot, Schnabel, Horowitz et al), and deliberately simplifying passages that one cannot play as written, or cannot be bothered to practise properly to play them, because the pianist thinks that people won't notice. And the likes of Horowitz altering Liszt, Rachmaninov et al to produce a more impressive effect isn't the same as Brendel and Lewis and one or two others simplifying difficult sections in order to be able to play them.

Do you get it now?
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2262216 - 04/15/14 03:32 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: square-39]
pianoloverus Offline
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Originally Posted By: square-39
I was in attendance at his performance of the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1, on April 11th, with the New York Philharmonic. In the program notes, Lewis stated "I am going to have to be thinking very seriously about the sound I make from the piano; I will have to try to step up to this Orchestra's sound."

Unfortunately, although he did play beautifully, he failed to meet his objectives. He lacked the power this piece demands and could not match the Philharmonic's strength.
The reviewer from the NY Times didn't agree with you and gave he performance a sensational review(including saying Lewis did keep up with the orchestra).

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#2262253 - 04/15/14 04:58 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
ScriabinAddict Offline
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Registered: 06/10/12
Posts: 335
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: bennevis
I have to say that my opinion of him took a nose dive after hearing the way he simplified some passages of Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy (and not just the octave section). Even his teacher Alfred Brendel didn't simplify quite as much.
Brendel and apparently Lewis are generally considered important Schubert pianists. I think most people are far more concerned with how much music they make then whether they simplify some passages.

Some of his simplifications are way too far though, e.g. his laughable facilitations in the dante sonata and his abject removal of the third hand arpeggios from the Norma fantasy. So much for the composer "coming first". And yes, as Rach would say, Brendel's playing is incredibly "musical".

Haven't heard much of Lewis's playing, though the article has piqued my interest. Any recommendations on recordings?

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#2262337 - 04/15/14 08:02 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
square-39 Offline
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Registered: 06/11/08
Posts: 57
Thank-you. I did see the review. I wasn't discussing "keeping up"; I was critical of his "strength".

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#2263077 - 04/17/14 01:33 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
KenM Offline
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Registered: 02/11/12
Posts: 5
I had never heard about Lewis' simplifications until this thread--I haven't heard his Wanderer--but I listen to him frequently (even saw him once), and I can vouch that he's the real deal. Brendel reigns in my book, but compare Lewis' current Beethoven to Brendel's early Beethoven, and I'll take Lewis every time. His playing demonstrates incredible nuance and a masterly (though not flashy) technique. There's no doubt in my mind that he, perhaps with Till Fellner and a few others, leads the next generation of pianists specializing in the Austro-German repertoire.

I would start with the Beethoven sonatas, but the Beethoven concertos and Schubert sonatas are also solid in my book.


Edited by KenM (04/17/14 01:34 PM)

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#2263143 - 04/17/14 04:34 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
hreichgott Offline
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Registered: 04/11/13
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Loc: western MA, USA
It's hard for me to believe that in this day and age, with the level of technical development of most conservatory freshmen, a seasoned concert performer would plan to play something simplified. What performances or recordings exactly are we talking about and what is the proof? Are we sure it isn't just a live performance where the pianist had a memory lapse and was able to carry through with fewer notes until arriving at a different section, and then someone posted the performance to youtube, or something?
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Sounding the depths of small pieces: Beethoven Op. 33
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I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

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#2263147 - 04/17/14 04:44 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: hreichgott]
bennevis Offline
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Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: hreichgott
It's hard for me to believe that in this day and age, with the level of technical development of most conservatory freshmen, a seasoned concert performer would plan to play something simplified. What performances or recordings exactly are we talking about and what is the proof? Are we sure it isn't just a live performance where the pianist had a memory lapse and was able to carry through with fewer notes until arriving at a different section, and then someone posted the performance to youtube, or something?

Paul Lewis's simplified Wanderer is on a fairly recent CD release. It is a studio recording - buy it and enjoy simplified Schubert! wink

I don't know whether Brendel's simplified Wanderer is still available in USA - it is available via Amazon in the UK as a download, and another version on DVD.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2263242 - 04/17/14 09:47 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
hreichgott Offline
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Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 1001
Loc: western MA, USA
I read some reviews of the Lewis Wanderer recording by knowledgeable people. No mention of simplifications.
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Sounding the depths of small pieces: Beethoven Op. 33
Daily attempts at 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 4, Pischna
Totally loving Fauré/Barcarolles and Ravel/Tombeau de Couperin
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

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#2263253 - 04/17/14 10:16 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: KenM]
Emanuel Ravelli Offline
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Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 687
Loc: Virginia
Originally Posted By: KenM
Brendel reigns in my book, but compare Lewis' current Beethoven to Brendel's early Beethoven, and I'll take Lewis every time. His playing demonstrates incredible nuance and a masterly (though not flashy) technique. There's no doubt in my mind that he, perhaps with Till Fellner and a few others, leads the next generation of pianists specializing in the Austro-German repertoire.

I would start with the Beethoven sonatas, but the Beethoven concertos and Schubert sonatas are also solid in my book.


My favorite Beethoven sonata recordings have always been Kempff's and Gilels' -- until I got Lewis' set. He brings peerless technique, great dynamic range and well-conceived musicality to every one of these, along with a freshness and liveliness that isn't always there in other great recordings. I also like his concerto recordings. If you only buy one set of complete sonatas, Lewis' set is highly recommended.
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#2263336 - 04/18/14 03:26 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: hreichgott]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: hreichgott
I read some reviews of the Lewis Wanderer recording by knowledgeable people. No mention of simplifications.

You should beg, borrow or steal that Harmonia Mundi recording and listen for yourself.

How many of those critics have played the piece? Or even know it well? Are you sure they really are 'knowledgeable'?

I have a BBC broadcast recording of Lewis playing it from over a decade ago. He played some of the octaves as single notes then. On his new studio recording, he did the same plus omit the LH arpeggios in a short section prior to that: he's the only concert pianist I've ever heard who does that, though there are others (including his teacher Brendel, of course) who've omitted some of those octaves - including Elisabeth Leonskaya (who once partnered Richter in Grieg's arrangements for two pianos of Mozart sonatas: Richter would have thrown a fit if he ever heard her simplify Schubert.......).

P.S. I think I've seen one review that mentioned those simplifications - it was probably in one of these three: Gramophone or International Record Review or BBC Music Magazine. See if you can look them up.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2263345 - 04/18/14 04:15 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
sandalholme Offline
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Registered: 12/31/09
Posts: 770
Loc: Dorset, UK
I have heard Paul Lewis in the Brahms 1st with the Bournemouth Symphony orchestra. Wonderful performance and didn't lack power. Re "strength": normally it is the soloist who in rehearsal sets his/her own interpretation down and the orchestra who adjusts accordingly. In other words, a conductor would up the power/muscularity for a powerful solo interpretation and similarly scale down the orchestral sound for a performer who takes a more intimate view. It seems Paul Lewis heard the orchestra and decided to adjust his interpretation, successfully according to that review.

I have his Beethoven sonata set, recorded live, and he does have an intriguing mix of romantic and classical approach: clear and precise, yet not lacking in feeling. Well worth listening to.

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#2266518 - 04/24/14 04:53 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
Pogorelich. Offline
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Registered: 12/28/08
Posts: 4528
Loc: in the past
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Originally Posted By: hreichgott
I read some reviews of the Lewis Wanderer recording by knowledgeable people. No mention of simplifications.

You should beg, borrow or steal that Harmonia Mundi recording and listen for yourself.

How many of those critics have played the piece? Or even know it well? Are you sure they really are 'knowledgeable'?

I have a BBC broadcast recording of Lewis playing it from over a decade ago. He played some of the octaves as single notes then. On his new studio recording, he did the same plus omit the LH arpeggios in a short section prior to that: he's the only concert pianist I've ever heard who does that, though there are others (including his teacher Brendel, of course) who've omitted some of those octaves - including Elisabeth Leonskaya (who once partnered Richter in Grieg's arrangements for two pianos of Mozart sonatas: Richter would have thrown a fit if he ever heard her simplify Schubert.......).

P.S. I think I've seen one review that mentioned those simplifications - it was probably in one of these three: Gramophone or International Record Review or BBC Music Magazine. See if you can look them up.


And based on a few missing notes, you are ready to dismiss this actually amazing pianist. So much judgement....

I've worked with him, and he was very inspiring. Also an incredibly pleasant human being, btw.
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#2266521 - 04/24/14 05:05 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: Pogorelich.]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.

And based on a few missing notes, you are ready to dismiss this actually amazing pianist. So much judgement....

I've worked with him, and he was very inspiring. Also an incredibly pleasant human being, btw.

I was judging him as a pianist, not as a person. He seems like a nice guy in TV interviews, but I've never met him in person. I never let pianists' personae influence my perception of them as pianists - just as I never judge people's professional competence based on how nice they are as people, in my job.

So, would you play a simplified Wanderer, ŕ la Lewis, in your own concerts?
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2266524 - 04/24/14 05:07 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
beet31425 Online   content
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Registered: 06/12/09
Posts: 3788
Loc: Bay Area, CA
I heard Paul Lewis in concert several years ago. He played Ligeti's exhilarating Musica Ricercata, and the Schubert G major sonata. It was beautifully done, and actually inspired me to get back into playing seriously.

Music is just an auditory illusion, and every conservatory teacher has his or her bag of tricks. I know at least one of the simplifications Barenboim uses (in Appassionata), and I'm sure some members here would find it reprehensible. To me this has little to do with the greatness of the artist.

-J
_________________________
Beethoven: op.109, 110, 111

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#2266525 - 04/24/14 05:09 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
Pogorelich. Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/08
Posts: 4528
Loc: in the past
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.

And based on a few missing notes, you are ready to dismiss this actually amazing pianist. So much judgement....

I've worked with him, and he was very inspiring. Also an incredibly pleasant human being, btw.

I was judging him as a pianist, not as a person. He seems like a nice guy in TV interviews, but I've never met him in person. I never let pianists' personae influence my perception of them as pianists - just as I never judge people's professional competence based on how nice they are as people, in my job.

So, would you play a simplified Wanderer, a la Lewis, in your own concerts?


I don't play Wanderer. And my mention of his personality had nothing to do with his pianistic abilities. Hence why I added the "btw" at the end. smile
_________________________

'I want to invest my emotions only in music; it will never disappoint me or hurt me - it is a safe place to be.'

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#2266537 - 04/24/14 05:25 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: beet31425]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: beet31425
I know at least one of the simplifications Barenboim uses (in Appassionata), and I'm sure some members here would find it reprehensible. To me this has little to do with the greatness of the artist.

-J

I couldn't give a toss how pianists achieve what they achieve - whatever sleights of hand they employ, how they redistribute notes contrary to what is printed in the score (e.g. in the opening of the Hammerklavier or Op.111), etc, etc - as long as they achieve it.

But when what they do is immediately obvious to the listener as contrary to what the composer wrote - I haven't heard Barenboim in the Appassionata (apart from his early EMI recording, where I didn't hear anything amiss), but it doesn't seem like it was anything as obvious as what Lewis did - and the composer isn't Liszt, then I take note, and say so.

Heck, there're plenty of people here who throw up their hands in horror at the great Michelangeli (et al) playing the start of Beethoven's Op.111 with two hands, though he was playing exactly the notes in the score. Why should Schubert be afforded far less respect, to the extent that it's actually OK to leave out notes - which are immediately obvious by their absence - to make things easier to play? That is double standards writ large.....

_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2266555 - 04/24/14 06:16 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
carey Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 6339
Loc: Phoenix, Arizona
Originally Posted By: bennevis
I have a BBC broadcast recording of Lewis playing it from over a decade ago. He played some of the octaves as single notes then. On his new studio recording, he did the same plus omit the LH arpeggios in a short section prior to that: he's the only concert pianist I've ever heard who does that, though there are others (including his teacher Brendel, of course) who've omitted some of those octaves - including Elisabeth Leonskaya (who once partnered Richter in Grieg's arrangements for two pianos of Mozart sonatas: Richter would have thrown a fit if he ever heard her simplify Schubert.......).

I'm assuming you mean the octaves in measures 160 through 163 in the first movement as well as the LH arpeggios in measures 132 and 134. Correct???
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#2266560 - 04/24/14 06:33 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: carey]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: carey
Originally Posted By: bennevis
I have a BBC broadcast recording of Lewis playing it from over a decade ago. He played some of the octaves as single notes then. On his new studio recording, he did the same plus omit the LH arpeggios in a short section prior to that: he's the only concert pianist I've ever heard who does that, though there are others (including his teacher Brendel, of course) who've omitted some of those octaves - including Elisabeth Leonskaya (who once partnered Richter in Grieg's arrangements for two pianos of Mozart sonatas: Richter would have thrown a fit if he ever heard her simplify Schubert.......).

I'm assuming you mean the octaves in measures 160 through 163 in the first movement as well as the LH arpeggios in measures 132 and 134. Correct???

Correct.

I only heard this CD recording once, maybe two years ago (or could have been last year), via a radio broadcast, but I recall that he didn't omit all the octaves, just some of them - and not all the same ones he omitted in the BBC broadcast from a decade or so earlier either. Have you got that CD/download?
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2266612 - 04/24/14 08:23 PM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: bennevis]
carey Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 6339
Loc: Phoenix, Arizona
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Originally Posted By: carey
Originally Posted By: bennevis
I have a BBC broadcast recording of Lewis playing it from over a decade ago. He played some of the octaves as single notes then. On his new studio recording, he did the same plus omit the LH arpeggios in a short section prior to that: he's the only concert pianist I've ever heard who does that, though there are others (including his teacher Brendel, of course) who've omitted some of those octaves - including Elisabeth Leonskaya (who once partnered Richter in Grieg's arrangements for two pianos of Mozart sonatas: Richter would have thrown a fit if he ever heard her simplify Schubert.......).

I'm assuming you mean the octaves in measures 160 through 163 in the first movement as well as the LH arpeggios in measures 132 and 134. Correct???

Correct.

I only heard this CD recording once, maybe two years ago (or could have been last year), via a radio broadcast, but I recall that he didn't omit all the octaves, just some of them - and not all the same ones he omitted in the BBC broadcast from a decade or so earlier either. Have you got that CD/download?
No I don't. smile
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#2268139 - 04/28/14 09:22 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: pianoloverus]
hreichgott Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 1001
Loc: western MA, USA
Hi Bennevis and others,

I'm aware I'm being annoying about this and I apologize for that. I persevere because I am deeply interested in this question of whether or not there exists a modern day concert pianist who purposely simplifies core repertoire. I have always assumed not.

I listened to this harmonia mundi recording on spotify

while following the Peters score available on imslp. I heard all the same notes I saw, with the following exceptions. Occasional grace notes and 16ths in inner voices during slow sections were struck so quietly that I was not completely sure I wasn't imagining them. But these were not technically difficult passages, and nearby grace notes and 16ths were audible. In the last movement there are passages at 2:32 and 2:42 where the LH has ascending arpeggios. I really could only hear the LH during the first and third beats, not the second and fourth, during the measures where the hands are close together on the second and fourth beats. When the hands move farther apart around 2:48 it is easy enough to hear all LH notes. If he did indeed leave out those notes it would eliminate the need for a couple of rapid jumps. But then why do that if capable of playing it unsimplified in surrounding measures, which he does. I think a better explanation is that he was only changing the pedal on beats 1 and 3 and making a diminuendo during the arpeggio, a good choice when the hands move close together and one wants to differentiate the voices, but it would cover up the end of an ascending arpeggio.

Relatedly, I felt the one drawback in an otherwise beautiful and wise interpretation was that the voices are sometimes differentiated too much; there were many places where the non-melodic voices were almost absent and I missed them.

There was an oddity about the recording that I noticed and maybe this contributed to your feeling that more notes were eliminated: the notes in the contra range are hard to hear in general, due to either how they miked the piano or how they did the mastering. In fact I had to plug in to the good speakers to make sure all the contra notes were there.

Anyway, I thought it was wonderful and now I'm off to play some D. 845 laugh


Edited by hreichgott (04/28/14 09:26 AM)
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Sounding the depths of small pieces: Beethoven Op. 33
Daily attempts at 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 4, Pischna
Totally loving Fauré/Barcarolles and Ravel/Tombeau de Couperin
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

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#2268159 - 04/28/14 10:25 AM Re: Sensational review of pianist Paul Lewis in NY Times [Re: hreichgott]
bennevis Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5118
Originally Posted By: hreichgott
while following the Peters score available on imslp. I heard all the same notes I saw, with the following exceptions. Occasional grace notes and 16ths in inner voices during slow sections were struck so quietly that I was not completely sure I wasn't imagining them. But these were not technically difficult passages, and nearby grace notes and 16ths were audible. In the last movement there are passages at 2:32 and 2:42 where the LH has ascending arpeggios. I really could only hear the LH during the first and third beats, not the second and fourth, during the measures where the hands are close together on the second and fourth beats. When the hands move farther apart around 2:48 it is easy enough to hear all LH notes. If he did indeed leave out those notes it would eliminate the need for a couple of rapid jumps. But then why do that if capable of playing it unsimplified in surrounding measures, which he does. I think a better explanation is that he was only changing the pedal on beats 1 and 3 and making a diminuendo during the arpeggio, a good choice when the hands move close together and one wants to differentiate the voices, but it would cover up the end of an ascending arpeggio.

Relatedly, I felt the one drawback in an otherwise beautiful and wise interpretation was that the voices are sometimes differentiated too much; there were many places where the non-melodic voices were almost absent and I missed them.

There was an oddity about the recording that I noticed and maybe this contributed to your feeling that more notes were eliminated: the notes in the contra range are hard to hear in general, due to either how they miked the piano or how they did the mastering. In fact I had to plug in to the good speakers to make sure all the contra notes were there.

Anyway, I thought it was wonderful and now I'm off to play some D. 845 laugh

I didn't hear anything amiss in the slow 'movement' or finale, which was all you alluded to (unless I'm misunderstanding you).

All the missing notes I noticed were in the first 'movement'.

However, I only heard his recording once, as I mentioned in a previous post, via digital radio, without the score in hand (though I know the work very well, having played it), and as I have no intention of buying the recording, won't have any opportunity to hear it again. I don't have Spotify.

Incidentally, for Brendel, you can see him leave out several of the octaves (or rather, replacing them with single notes) on YouTube. Someone posted a link to it before, but I can't be bothered to look for it now.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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