Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#2262250 - 04/15/14 04:50 PM Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Born in Kharkov, Ukraine in 1877, Sergei Bortkiewicz studied with Liadov and Arek at the Imperial Conservatory in St. Petersburg and in Leipzig with Reisenauer. He toured Europe as a performing artist and also taught at the Klindworth-Scharwenka Conservatory in Berlin. He gave many master classes and also composed primarily for piano solo as well as composing four piano concertos. Bortkiewicz’s musical style is late romantic with stylistic links to Chopin, Liszt, Tchaikovsky and Wagner.

World War II brought severe hardships to Bortkiewicz and his wife then residing in Vienna. Much of his sheet music was destroyed by the Allied bombings in Germany, thereby cutting off his income. His friend Hugo van Dalen, a Dutch touring artist, helped Bortkiewicz financially, and was an exponent of the composer’s music. Bortkiewicz also taught at the Vienna City Conservatory at that time. After the war Bortkiewicz tried to rebuild his status as a composer and pianist, but after his death in 1952, he and his music were all but forgotten. There is now a renaissance of his music.

Very recently the Yugoslav Suite, Op. 58 composed in 1940--but lost for decades--was discovered in the Rahter publishing archive. From the suite I’ve drawn No. 5, “Nocturne”, and have made the first recording of this “new music”. The piece is largely in E minor, however, the key of the coda becomes E major casting brilliant sunshine replacing an earlier dark mood.

LINK: http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=55045.0

Piano: Baldwin Model L Artist Grand (6’3”) with lid fully open
Recorder: Roland R-44
Mics: Matched pair of Earthworks TC-20 small diaphragm, omni-directional condenser mics in A-B configuration


Edited by RachFan (04/15/14 04:55 PM)

Top
#2263359 - 04/18/14 05:23 AM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Tony007 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/27/13
Posts: 122
Loc: Switzerland
Hi RachFan, thank you very much for this precious post! How sad that there is still no reply, I want to change this today!

What a moving fate! This music is full of melancholy and nostalgia, and your very good playing brings finally to life so many noble feelings. Are you planning to record the other parts of that Suite as well? By the way: why that name "Yugoslav Suite"? Is there some biographical explanation?


Edited by Tony007 (04/18/14 05:27 AM)

Top
#2263428 - 04/18/14 09:26 AM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Tim Adrianson Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/10
Posts: 1021
Hi, RachFan -- Tony007's post reminded me that I hadn't responded, as I had planned. My general reaction is that the piece is effective, but not top-drawer Bortkiewicz - the few other pieces I've heard of his are more complex and inventive. But, like Tony, I'd like to hear the entire Suite -- I suspect this Nocturne needs to be understood in context; it doesn't come off for me as a "stand-alone" piece, and this is probably by design. For me emotionally, the entire piece is sad - the finish in a major mode only serves to underline the resignation and defeat of a sweet-sad smile.

I don't know if you noticed, but there's another thread for submissions of various Suites for piano, and they don't have to be submitted until early November. This would be a nice addition to that.

Top
#2263497 - 04/18/14 11:56 AM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Tony007,

Thanks so much for noticing my post! I had pretty much given up on it here at Piano World, thinking that next time I should post only on Piano Street, Piano Society and YouTube. I'm glad now to know my thinking was premature!

And thanks so my for you praise of my playing of this piece. I agree with you, it is hauntingly beautiful.

As for the name "Yugoslav Suite". Bortkiewicz and his wife resided mostly in Berlin and Vienna; however, there was a time around 1920 when they spent time in Istanbul. At that time Bortkiewicz toured as a pianist through some of the countries in that region, and often his recitals were organized by foreign embassies. In Istanbul the Bortkiewicz's became friends with the Yugoslavian ambassador and his wife Natalie Chaponitsch in Istanbul. So she was the probable link to Yugoslavia.

There are three other pieces in the suite--"In the Woods", "Village Dance", and "On the Banks of the Danube". In my earlier years I was a "well rounded pianist", but since the 1980s I've focused only on the Late Romantic period. The logistical problem is this: The piano literature is extremely vast, and in the normal lifetime one can only scratch the surface of it. In other words, the repertoire is huge, but life is too short. This year I turn 70, so I've narrowed the field and play only the Late Romantics now. Also aesthetically, I look for music that's achingly beautiful with plenty of romantic surge in them. If a piece doesn't meet my aesthetic standard, then I keep looking.

When it comes to full sets, I normally don't do them--because I would have to play pieces that I don't enjoy. The one exception was when I did three complete sets of the Russian composer Georgy Catoire--only because all of his music is astonishingly beautiful!

Thanks again for pausing here and listening to my recording. I really appreciate it!

David

Top
#2263500 - 04/18/14 12:01 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: RachFan
In my earlier years I was a "well rounded pianist", but since the 1980s I've focused only on the Late Romantic period. The logistical problem is this: The piano literature is extremely vast, and in the normal lifetime one can only scratch the surface of it. In other words, the repertoire is huge, but life is too short. This year I turn 70, so I've narrowed the field and play only the Late Romantics now.

If you're only going to play one type of music, hadn't it better be Bach or Mozart rather than late romantics?
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263505 - 04/18/14 12:06 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Tim Adrianson]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Tim,

I appreciate your stopping by. I agree with you that this score is not Bortkiewicz at his best. And it has an echo of Chopin. But it has been exciting doing the first recording of one of these pieces. I listed the other titles from Op. 58 in reply to Tony007. I agree that the group might provide more context. As for this nocturne, it's brief but very plaintive and beautiful too.

I haven't completely ruled out doing this suite, but if it were to turn out that I am less enthusiastic about the other three pieces, then I might not like preparing them. In that sense, as a pianist I wouldn't want to rob Bortkiewicz of his genius.

Thanks again for your comments.

David

Top
#2263525 - 04/18/14 01:09 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Old Man Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/12
Posts: 777
Loc: Michigan, USA
RachFan, a wonderful piece of music and beautifully played! thumb

As one who is not fond of most 20th century+ music, I read your introduction, and almost moved on. I'd never heard of Bortkiewicz, and figured why bother? But then I thought, "What the heck, you're already here. Click the damn link!" I'm so glad I did.

The Wikipedia article about him describes a life of constant dislocation and upheaval, both physical and emotional, and this small sample of his music certainly reflects that. The article also says that "He was unaffected by the music trends of the 20th century — the composer never saw himself as a 'modernist'" (which may explain my immediate attraction to his music.) grin

Anyway, thank you for the introduction!

Top
#2263536 - 04/18/14 01:42 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Polyphonist,

To be honest Baroque and Classical music were never my forte, though I do like to listen to others playing it.

David

Top
#2263539 - 04/18/14 01:44 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
I see. It just seems silly, though, to limit yourself to such a narrow range when there is so much better music out there.
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263546 - 04/18/14 01:58 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Polyphonist]
Old Man Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/12
Posts: 777
Loc: Michigan, USA
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
I see. It just seems silly, though, to limit yourself to such a narrow range when there is so much better music out there.

"Better" to whom?

When you reach a certain age, you realize that time's a wastin'. So you listen to, or play whatever feeds your soul. The word "better" is somewhat meaningless. smile

Top
#2263560 - 04/18/14 02:27 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
And I thought you would agree with me. whome
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263600 - 04/18/14 03:22 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Old Man]
JoelW Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 4762
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: Old Man
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
I see. It just seems silly, though, to limit yourself to such a narrow range when there is so much better music out there.

"Better" to whom?

When you reach a certain age, you realize that time's a wastin'. So you listen to, or play whatever feeds your soul. The word "better" is somewhat meaningless. smile

You are wise, Old Man. smile

Top
#2263657 - 04/18/14 04:51 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Old Man,

Thanks! I could not have phrased that answer any better.

And I see that JoelW gets it too.

I can well understand that many pianists enjoy Bach, for example, with its statements/sequences, attention to fugue voices' entrances, strettos, mordents, picadie thirds, palltrillers, etc. To that I say great!! I respect their preferences in the piano literature, and am glad they enjoy that set of challenges. And I admire their artistry.

For me now it's very different. I enjoy the achingly beautiful melodies and the big romantic surges of Late Romanticism. And that piano literature is huge too. Just to mention a few: Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Dohnanyi, Medtner, Bortkiewicz, Catoire, Liadov, Glazunov, Liapunov, etc. This is some of the most challenging and gorgeous music ever devised for the piano. So no, I don't feel self-deprived for no longer playing Baroque when I can far more enjoy preparing and recording Late Romantic music. That's not to criticize the Old Masters in any way, nor the pianists who toil to play their music. That's what is so great about music in general and the piano literature in particular--there is far more than enough for everyone with different tastes in music.

David





Edited by RachFan (04/18/14 05:11 PM)

Top
#2263658 - 04/18/14 04:54 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
I'm not going to say what I want to say right now.
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263684 - 04/18/14 05:41 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
JoelW Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/25/12
Posts: 4762
Loc: USA
It probably doesn't matter anyway.

Top
#2263686 - 04/18/14 05:48 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
Joel is doing his best to crash the thread.
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263706 - 04/18/14 06:19 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Old Man Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/12
Posts: 777
Loc: Michigan, USA
Since I'm only a few years younger than you, RachFan, my response to Polyphonist was based on my own feelings about music. I've sometimes been criticized for being "close minded" to modern music. And while I have little doubt that I could find gems here or there, my time on earth is limited. So I tend to gravitate toward those composers who have an established history of bringing me the greatest joy. Since I've barely scratched the surface of Bach's output, why would I waste time on Bartok? grin (Sorry, Bartok fans!)

And I'm talking about limiting my listening to certain periods. When you wrote of limiting your focus to the "late romantics", I assumed you were referring to your playing, and that's an entirely different kettle of fish. I'm only a low-grade intermediate player, so the "playing" part doesn't enter into it for me, because there's little I can play anyway. (Even took a peek at some Bortkiewicz scores on IMSLP. Yikes! Slammed that door quickly!) Since learning to play a piece imposes far greater time demands than simple listening, I understood perfectly why you would want to narrow your focus to a period, or group of composers that really speaks to you.

One day these young whippersnappers like Polyphonist will come to understand all of this. laugh

Top
#2263715 - 04/18/14 06:32 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Old Man]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Old Man
One day these young whippersnappers like Polyphonist will come to understand all of this. laugh

On the contrary - I'm very similar to you.
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263717 - 04/18/14 06:37 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Polyphonist]
Old Man Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/04/12
Posts: 777
Loc: Michigan, USA
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
I'm not going to say what I want to say right now.

Your lip is bleeding. Spit it out.

Top
#2263719 - 04/18/14 06:42 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Old Man]
Polyphonist Online   content
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 7509
Loc: New York City
Originally Posted By: Old Man
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
I'm not going to say what I want to say right now.

Your lip is bleeding. Spit it out.

That's one I haven't heard before. laugh
_________________________
Regards,

Polyphonist

Top
#2263730 - 04/18/14 07:03 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Old Man]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Old Man,

I agree with you 101%. Yes, I was speaking mostly about playing and recording, which I've been doing for many years. (I've been posting my recordings here at Piano World for 11 years or so.) When I was a kid, I participated in the adjudicated National Piano Playing Auditions, and for 10 years had to ready 10 to 15 memorized pieces from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic and Modern periods. So I did my stint a very long time ago on being the "well-rounded student" so far as stylistic periods are concerned. In my 40s I studied for seven years with an artist-teacher. I got to choose all the repertoire which included a little Classical music but a lot of Romantic, Impressionistic and Late Romantic works especially. He taught me a lot about the fine points of interpretation and performance. But he also taught me the most important thing: Teaching the student how to teach himself (which I've been doing ever since). So over the years I've been able to follow my own preferences in selecting repertoire, learning it, recording and sharing it. Going on 70 what could be better than that?

You raise an excellent point about listening. Although I have plenty of CDs here, usually I listen to performances here at Piano World, Piano Society, Piano Street, and YouTube. At all these sites I've contributed a lot of my recordings, but I also love to listen to other pianists play the music that most moves me. If a musical style does not interest me, I don't have the time left to waste on it quite frankly--because there are too many Late Romantic composers and pianists whom I greatly enjoy.

Like you, I do understand the perspective of youth, and I always try to encourage the younger pianists. But the day will come when they too are considered senior citizens. (And it comes along fast!) They as musicians will then have to decide how to best focus on the music they truly love during their waning years.

David


Edited by RachFan (04/18/14 07:08 PM)

Top
#2263776 - 04/18/14 08:27 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Damon Online   happy
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/22/06
Posts: 6065
Loc: St. Louis area
Originally Posted By: RachFan
I had pretty much given up on it here at Piano World, thinking that next time I should post only on Piano Street, Piano Society and YouTube.


I tend to not listen to your posts because they send me to Piano Street. If you post on youtube, why not just embed that post here?
_________________________
It's been scientifically proven that Horowitz sucks.

Top
#2263878 - 04/18/14 11:56 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Damon,

I find that the playback volume level at Piano Street is more accurate. What I have found over the years (I've been a member here for 11 years) is that when I upload a video to YouTube, its so-called "processing" results in a playback volume that is considerably louder than the actual input level when I made the recording. Awhile back one of the listeners at YouTube brought that up. I apologized, suggested he just turn the volume down at his end, and mentioned "YouTube processing". He instantly knew about the excess volume problem there. I hate it when it knocks the headphones off a listener's head, as that happened to me there too.

David


Edited by RachFan (04/18/14 11:58 PM)

Top
#2263916 - 04/19/14 02:23 AM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
Tony007 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/27/13
Posts: 122
Loc: Switzerland
I can see that my initial comment has lead to a big discussion smile

David: I'm a little younger than you (going to be 56 this year), but I think I can understand what you mean. Why do I have to play entire groups of works, if there is just one among them which really catches my interest? Listening is one thing, but practising a piece every day makes no sense if there is not a very deep emotional connection. I often start practising something new just in order to find out how deep my interest and love is. And after one or two days I can clearly feel if I want to go on or not. For now this kind of selecting literature includes a big stilistic range (about from Haydn to Debussy), but who knows? Maybe in ten years I'll concentrate on a smaller range, too?

Anyway: thanks again for sharing this fascinating music, and also for all your very interesting explanations!

With best wishes

Felix

Top
#2264046 - 04/19/14 11:39 AM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: Tony007]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Felix,

I very much agree with your assessment process in exploring a new piece. It doesn't take long to determine whether it will bring you pleasure or not. If not, more hours of practicing will not likely bring a change of mind. There's a parallel here with technique as well. When it comes to technique, we all know our own abilities and limitations. So if we decide to abandon a piece given its degree of difficulty and put it away, it should be done without any regrets.

Later in life I believe it unlikely that one would specialize only in the music of a single composer--although it has happened that a pianist has set out to learn the entire oeuvre of a composer. That's relatively rare. But insofar as focusing more on one or two stylist periods is more common. That also offers the benefit of working in different idioms of a number of composers which enables one to continue honing technique along with playing music that one truly loves.

I'm so glad you liked the Bortkiewicz nocturne. I'm happy doing my small part in helping this deserving composer to at least gain posthumously the recognition he so much deserves.

Best regards,

David

Top
#2264054 - 04/19/14 11:58 AM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
TwoSnowflakes Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/15/12
Posts: 1031
Oh, lovely! Thanks for sharing.

It definitely hits me with a big opening dose of Chopin Op. 72 No 1.

But then it goes its own way and I'm glad I listened and now I know a new composer. That makes two in as many weeks, and both were, strangely, Ukrainian! (Kosenko was the other.)
_________________________
Currently:
Bach, French Suites, No. 3 BWV 814
Brahms, Op. 118 No. 2 Intermezzo A major
Chopin, Mazurka Op. 67 No.4
With the pedal I love to meddle; When Paderewski comes this way... -Irving Berlin

Top
#2264078 - 04/19/14 12:58 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
carey Online   content
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 6207
Loc: Phoenix, Arizona
Originally Posted By: RachFan
When I was a kid, I participated in the adjudicated National Piano Playing Auditions, and for 10 years had to ready 10 to 15 memorized pieces from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic and Modern periods. So I did my stint a very long time ago on being the "well-rounded student" so far as stylistic periods are concerned.

I participated n the NPPA only once, when I was 14. Still have the "report card" with the judge's comments. It was a very positive experience overall - and I regret that I didn't continue to participate.
Quote:
In my 40s I studied for seven years with an artist-teacher. I got to choose all the repertoire which included a little Classical music but a lot of Romantic, Impressionistic and Late Romantic works especially. He taught me a lot about the fine points of interpretation and performance. But he also taught me the most important thing: Teaching the student how to teach himself (which I've been doing ever since). So over the years I've been able to follow my own preferences in selecting repertoire, learning it, recording and sharing it. Going on 70 what could be better than that?
T'was definitely a good decision on your part to study with the artist teacher. I stopped taking lessons at age 29 - but at that point was equipped with the skills needed to teach myself - which has been a tremendous asset over the years.
Quote:
Like you, I do understand the perspective of youth, and I always try to encourage the younger pianists. But the day will come when they too are considered senior citizens. (And it comes along fast!) They as musicians will then have to decide how to best focus on the music they truly love during their waning years.
At age 67 I can definitely relate. Very selective now about what I attempt to learn...and trying very hard to get as much recorded as possible while I still can.

Thanks for sharing your performance of this wonderful Nocturne David !!
_________________________
YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/pianophilo

Top
#2264108 - 04/19/14 02:16 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: TwoSnowflakes]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi TwoSnowflakes,

I've been waiting to see when someone would recall Chopin 72/1 ha-ha! Well, who better than Chopin to inspire us? But as you say, once the piece moves along, it takes on its own character.

I briefly looked into Kosenko's music several months ago and thought there was potential there. Probably at some point I should revisit his scores.

David

Top
#2264124 - 04/19/14 02:56 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: carey]
RachFan Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/03
Posts: 1329
Loc: Maine, U.S.
Hi Carey,

I really enjoyed my 10 years with the National Piano Playing Auditions. It required not only playing all the musical styles well, but also created yearly goals, structure and self-discipline for the pianist. At the end the rewards were the diploma in artistic piano playing, the Paderewski Gold Medal, and a scholarship from the National Guild of Piano Teachers. Oh, and my mug shot in the 1964 Yearbook and Directory. For an 18 year old that was wonderful recognition. Simultaneously in that 10th year I entered a competition in Boston adjudicated by New England Conservatory piano professors, and played in the finalists' recital there. Right after that I played my senior recital.

Following all that, my career was in business administration, but piano has always been my favorite hobby. The former was my vocation and the latter my avocation.

The National Piano Playing Auditions still exist and would greatly benefit any young person studying piano. Sadly, I'm told that today there is so much pressure placed on kids for academics and extra curricular activities, that most study piano for only a brief time if at all, as they don't have enough time to practice and advance.

I agree with you. My first teacher of 10 years taught me all the fundamentals of practicing, technique and performing. She also took me to many piano recitals given by touring artists. The artist-teacher of 7 years focused more on expanding repertoire and the fine points of interpretation and performance. For a great many years I've been my own teacher as I commune with the great composers. I enjoy every minute of it!

I think the way you summed up your current goals is very similar to my approach now.

Thanks for chatting about all this.

David


Edited by RachFan (04/19/14 02:58 PM)

Top
#2264173 - 04/19/14 04:48 PM Re: Bortkiewicz, Nocturne, Op. 58, No. 5 from the Yugoslav Suite [Re: RachFan]
TwoSnowflakes Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/15/12
Posts: 1031
Originally Posted By: RachFan
Hi TwoSnowflakes,

I've been waiting to see when someone would recall Chopin 72/1 ha-ha! Well, who better than Chopin to inspire us? But as you say, once the piece moves along, it takes on its own character.

I briefly looked into Kosenko's music several months ago and thought there was potential there. Probably at some point I should revisit his scores.

David


I can't claim to have independently discovered them, because I learned about them from a post here, but it was the Kosenko Etudes in the Style of Old Dances that got me.

Especially the 7. Gavotte, which probably is the piece that got the most play this week in my car.
_________________________
Currently:
Bach, French Suites, No. 3 BWV 814
Brahms, Op. 118 No. 2 Intermezzo A major
Chopin, Mazurka Op. 67 No.4
With the pedal I love to meddle; When Paderewski comes this way... -Irving Berlin

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  Kreisler 
What's Hot!!
Our latest Issue is available now...
Piano News - Interesting & Fun Piano Related Newsletter! (free)
-------------------
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
167 registered (accordeur, Alex1, ajames, AmateurBob, 38 invisible), 1893 Guests and 7 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
75516 Members
42 Forums
156163 Topics
2293320 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Bored kid at Cosco..
by Norbert
2 minutes 14 seconds ago
Need help and advice please!
by Pover
3 minutes 47 seconds ago
Kawai K200
by Vidsin
Today at 02:46 PM
Medelssohn on meaning in music
by phantomFive
Today at 01:52 PM
Correcting Heavy Piano Touchweight in Grand Pianos
by Paul678
Today at 01:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission