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#2268471 - 04/29/14 02:08 AM Sonata in B flat with a sad ending
caters Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/27/14
Posts: 186
Loc: Columbus, ohio, USA
I once wanted to write a symphony but than I thought "How am I going to decide which notes be played at which times for so many instruments?" I than thought of piano concerto and thought "Hmm If I figure out the notes for the piano I can base the orchestra off of that." but eventually I decided that my first major step in composition be a Piano Sonata. Mozart made sonatas before he made symphonies. I bet Beethoven and Haydn did the same thing of sonatas first than symphonies than concertos.

So I write the first movement in the same form as Mozart's K 545 with: PT, ST, Close, Repeat, Development, PT, ST, Close, Repeat

I have now lost my composition book and so have lost my sonata.

I have looked for years and even when the house was clean I still could not find it.

Thus now if I want to compose a sonata I have to start from scratch all over again but thankfully I have MuseScore now which will let me use the keyboard to put in notes instead of playing a measure or 2 on the piano and than writing those notes.

Still it would be nice if I could find at least a composition book for my Sonata in B flat.

Mine might have same form as Mozart's but like Beethoven's have four movements.

Sonatas I have heard can have 2-5 movements but it is usually 3 or 4.

Symphonies can have 3-5. Mozart's Symphony no. 1 K 6 in E flat has 3 movements.

Divermentos can have anywhere from 3-10 movements in a single piece.

Unlike most multi movement pieces Divermentos don't have a strict form. In other words some movements might have binary or ternary form whereas others have sonata form.


If I ever get my sonatas or symphonies published and people like it like they do Mozart's than I might become really famous and be called by some people "The Mozart of the 21st Century"

Or maybe people will decide it is more like Beethoven and call me "The Beethoven of the 21st century" or maybe like Bach and be called "The Bach of the 21st century" or "Vivaldi of 21st century" or some other composer of 21st century.


Edited by caters (04/29/14 02:14 AM)

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#2268697 - 04/29/14 02:04 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: caters]
caters Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/27/14
Posts: 186
Loc: Columbus, ohio, USA
actually the symphony no. 1 in E flat is K 16

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#2268756 - 04/29/14 04:27 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: caters]
Ritzycat Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/11/14
Posts: 146
I have written a few "symphonies", but more so just an unorganized collection of instruments farting out some semblance of harmony and melody, and I did all of this before I began regularly composing piano songs. It might come more natural to me, because I am a clarinet player in an ensemble and I am constantly surrounded by these foreign noises in band rehearsals. I have translated a lot of these motifs from several pieces (we rarely play full symphonies or tunes, mostly just excerpts) and incorporated them into some of the piano songs I play. I guess that's simply just the progress of musical comprehension and not necessarily a direct result of just having played these tunes. However, since clarinets are usually playing a lot of fast runs, a lot of my piano music is very fast-paced, composed of fast sections, and concentrated in the treble clef.

I haven't really tried making any new 10+ instrument pieces since the few I made a long time ago. It really is just too much for me to focus on, and I had often found myself simply writing in the same notes for several instruments because it took so long. I may try it again and maybe use something like Farandole (bizet) for my inspiration. We played that piece several months ago, and it was fairly simple at least to the ear. Not too much intense harmony or crazy stuff, just three voices that sort of traded off in importance throughout the tune and ended really majestically.

So, I got into making these band songs before I got into piano stuff. I may try it again sometime, and see if I have improved at all.

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#2268776 - 04/29/14 05:38 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: caters]
Iori Fujita Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/21/10
Posts: 58
Loc: Tokyo, Japan
I think it is too difficult now to compose a classic style piano music. Of course it is possible but no one would listen to it even if it may be like Mozart's one. If it is in the realm of popular or jazz music, people might like it. The Samurakouji story tells us that without drama his? works would not be in the music market. Samurakouji was said to be a contemporary Beethoven who lost hearing ability. But it has been all fake.
So I made the Italian Concert No.2 for a movie version of the german mystery "Toedliche Kantaten ( Lethal Cantatas )".
http://www.geocities.jp/imyfujita/italianconcerto2/index.html
This Italian Concert No.2 had not existed before I made it. But anyway it was made of Bach's.

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#2268797 - 04/29/14 06:32 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: caters]
Ritzycat Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/11/14
Posts: 146


You're right about what you are saying, though. The most unfortunate thing is that popular culture nowadays sort of ignores classical music. In a few hundred years, Michael Jackson and Madonna will be our Beethoven and Mozart. Of course, we have to make sure that Mozart and Bach and the other classical, baroque, romantic, old composers of all kind are not forgotten.

The only classical music radio in my city had gone down for many years. It only very recently came back up. I cannot really listen to modern music, and I am trying very hard to stay away from it because I prefer the pure, emotional, and incredible stories and themes behind the classical composers that is simply not found in degenerative modern "music".



Edited by Ritzycat (04/29/14 06:33 PM)

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#2269027 - 04/30/14 09:35 AM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: Ritzycat]
Steve Chandler Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/18/05
Posts: 2698
Loc: Urbandale, Iowa
Originally Posted By: Ritzycat
I cannot really listen to modern music, and I am trying very hard to stay away from it because I prefer the pure, emotional, and incredible stories and themes behind the classical composers that is simply not found in degenerative modern "music".

I understand that some modern music is hard to listen to, some of it is so unrelentingly dissonant it borders on noise. But some modern music is strikingly beautiful. By avoiding all of it you avoid hearing the best music of the last 100 years. When you use a word like degenerative you make a judgment and that says more about you than any of the music you're referring to.

I'll give you an example. The first time I heard the Barber Piano Sonata, my initial thought was, "What is this Crap?" However, I think the first movement is intended to have a bit of shock value. By the time he gets to the fugal last movement you've experienced a wide range of emotions and the fugue takes all that to new heights. Olga Kern does a nice job with it (I looked for Hamelin and didn't find his version of this piece on Youtube).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dMEchdu9PU

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#2269176 - 04/30/14 05:10 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: caters]
Ritzycat Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/11/14
Posts: 146
Sorry about that I think you may have misinterpreted me. The majority of songs that I hear others listening to and what is across the radio on all stations seems very meaningless to me. It also does not help that I am somewhat hard of hearing too, so I cannot even understand the lyrics in these songs, and it doesn't help that it is already somewhat obscured behind loud and repeated melodies in the background.

I am not really referring to modern neoclassical music or instrumental pieces. I probably should have used the word "popular" music instead of "modern" because there are plenty of pieces in the last 100 years I am very fond of. Unfortunately, this type of music music is not really popularized. Classical music, or modern songs that don't include excessive use of auto-voice correctors, synthesizers, etc., are not made very public. Most people can listen to a popular song and pick out what it is, but classical music is appreciated by very few. This is mostly just because people do not want to hear it. They become used to these modern tunes and they are entranced by the simple and elegant melodies, but it almost seems superficial and impure. I guess this is just an issue that we have to live with. I do not see any sort of "classical revolution" any time soon.

I call modern music, or "popular" music degenerative because I think it is taking a step back from what music once was. I do not necessarily think every single song written in the last 100 years is degenerative. Songs are short now because people have much more fast-paced lifestyles than they once did. Nobody really would care for sitting through a 45 minute concerto or symphony... they would rather prefer a 3-4 minute song with a repeated theme and bridge with catchy lyrics. There is much less time for artists to get a message across, if there even is one. There is likely a large amount of modern songs that actually have depth and meaning to them, but they come few and far between in the realm of the music I am commonly exposed to. Songs always include cliche themes of love at first sight, marijuana, heartbreak, etc. These themes appeal to a large amount of the population, esp. young people. There is a lack of originality, and I find it hard to differentiate between many of the artists because they all seem to have the same "story" as told through their songs. The personal styles and traits of composers are more determinable in classical music. In modern tunes, outside of the voice of the singer him/herself I cannot tell who it belongs to. This is important because it makes the music personal, and despite that they may be singing of personal things, I cannot attribute it to them as their style, personality, and disposition.

I have found some unique traits in modern African music. the African continent is exposed to a variety of different hardships, these stories are told through their artists' songs much more clearly. This ethnic music makes it easy for me to associate with the culture and political landscape of Africa and I think it is more a testament to what they are actually feeling instead of the tunes that are made popular in America, for example.


Edited by Ritzycat (04/30/14 05:57 PM)

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#2272487 - 05/07/14 06:26 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: Ritzycat]
Exalted Wombat Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 1194
Loc: London UK
Originally Posted By: Ritzycat
...The most unfortunate thing is that popular culture nowadays sort of ignores classical music.



Or could it be that "Modern Classical" consciously ignores popular taste?

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#2272505 - 05/07/14 07:01 PM Re: Sonata in B flat with a sad ending [Re: caters]
Ritzycat Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/11/14
Posts: 146
Yes, that's what it is.

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