Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Gifts and supplies for the musician
SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
Ad (Piano Sing)
How to Make Your Piano Sing
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pianoteq
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
Who's Online
155 registered (accordeur, ajames, A-Tom, Al LaPorte, Almaviva, 44 invisible), 1709 Guests and 20 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Pianos
Topic Options
#2270858 - 05/04/14 08:01 AM Looking for a new "stretch goal"
Saranoya Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 632
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Hi everyone,

I've finished learning Chopin's Nocturne n° 19. It was way (and I mean *way*) beyond me when I started. But I feel confident now that I will be able to play it adequately at my upcoming piano exam, which is June 13. This is not to say that my rendition of it rivals any professional pianist's version; of course it doesn't. It's just gotten to a point now where I no longer need to feel embarrassed playing it in public.

I spent over four months getting to this point, and now I need another piece to take the Nocturne's place. Which is to say, I need something I can get ready to perform in three-four months or so, and which "speaks" to me enough that I will actually be wanting to spend that much time learning it. I've considered doing Mozart (K545), but although that would probably take me a long time to get up to tempo while preserving the requisite accuracy, evenness and musicality, I fear it would also get old rather quickly. There's a reason Mozart called it an "easy sonata": it is exceedingly predictable.

There is another Chopin piece (Grande Valse Brillante in A minor, opus 34 n° 2) that I tried to tackle last summer, and ultimately dropped because I was running out of time without moving appreciably closer to something I could have presented to my teacher in September without shame. Maybe now, I am closer to where I need to be in order to learn that, and I should give it another try. However, I'd like to avoid doing two major Chopin projects in a row.

So then, LarryShone's current thread drew my attention to Rachmaninov's prelude in C# minor (opus 3 n° 2), which fulfils the requirement of "speaking to me" handsomely. But it is probably something that would take me far longer than three months to even just get under my fingers, let alone play the way it was intended.

So I turn to you guys: tell me about the pieces that keep you motivated; the things that you think might not be quite within your reach yet, but close enough that you can "feel it", so to speak; the ones that inspired you to take up playing the piano in the first place. Maybe if I listen to a bunch of them, I'll find something I really, really want to tackle next.
_________________________
Beginner with some priors since 9/2012

Currently Playable
Bach 846, 926, 930
Beethoven 27/2 mvt. 1
Burgmüller 100/3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 19, 25
Chopin 72/1
Clementi 36/1
Grieg 12/1, 7
Tchaikovsky 39/9

Future
Burgmüller 109
Bartok Sz 56
Mozart K331

Top
(ads P/S)

Petrof Pianos

#2270863 - 05/04/14 08:17 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
Greener Offline

Platinum Supporter until July 22 2014


Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 1267
Loc: Toronto
Originally Posted By: Saranoya

So I turn to you guys: tell me about the pieces that keep you motivated; the things that you think might not be quite within your reach yet, but close enough that you can "feel it", so to speak. Maybe if I listen to a bunch of them, I'll find something I really, really want to tackle next.

Do you like Bach?
I have a similar approach to you, it sounds like, Saranoya. The pieces I choose are often way stretching my capacity. Oddly enough, once in the hopper long enough and beyond the recording stage, most get to the point of being quite presentable.

I was looking for a Bach piece and have picked Badinerie. It is short but not easy. Actually, it does not seem to be that hard either. But that is just the reading part. Bringing to a reasonable performance tempo will be tough. At any rate, it is on the radar for August quarterly.

So here is one suggestion:

_________________________

Top
#2270867 - 05/04/14 08:31 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Greener]
Saranoya Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 632
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Hi Greener,

Thanks for the suggestion!

I seem to have vague childhood memories of listening periodically to an orchestral version of this piece. That will screw with my brain if I try, now, to learn the piano version. I know because I'm also working on Bartok's Hungarian Dances, which I originally heard in an arrangement for two violins and a base. It's ... confusing, because while I am playing the piano version, all I can hear in my mind are those two violins.

So to clarify: I would like suggestions for things that were originally written for piano or some other keyboard instrument, or if they weren't, are obscure enough that I've probably never heard the "original" version.
_________________________
Beginner with some priors since 9/2012

Currently Playable
Bach 846, 926, 930
Beethoven 27/2 mvt. 1
Burgmüller 100/3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 19, 25
Chopin 72/1
Clementi 36/1
Grieg 12/1, 7
Tchaikovsky 39/9

Future
Burgmüller 109
Bartok Sz 56
Mozart K331

Top
#2270872 - 05/04/14 08:44 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
Sam S Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/12/07
Posts: 1428
Loc: Georgia, USA
The Mendelssohn Songs Without Words or the Grieg Lyric pieces. You can learn a lot by playing through some of these.

There are 48 of the Mendelssohn - I've played most of op 19 and 53/5. My favorite of the Mendelssohn is 38/6 "Duetto", which I have played here. But here is a pro playing it:



My favorite of the Grieg Lyric Pieces is "Gade", which I have also played, but here's a pro:



Sam

Top
#2270898 - 05/04/14 09:53 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
peterws Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3868
Loc: Northern England.
You`ll feel this, lass. You can take it as far as you like. Have fun!

_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes � but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

Top
#2270905 - 05/04/14 10:12 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: peterws]
Saranoya Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 632
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Thanks, Sam and Peter!

I tried to tackle one of the Songs without Words before, for a themed recital on here. Unfortunately, I didn't get it done in time to actually participate. I'll have a look at them again, now.

Peter, I like your suggestion for which Mozart Sonata to try. I had no idea the Rondo alla Turca came from that!
_________________________
Beginner with some priors since 9/2012

Currently Playable
Bach 846, 926, 930
Beethoven 27/2 mvt. 1
Burgmüller 100/3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 19, 25
Chopin 72/1
Clementi 36/1
Grieg 12/1, 7
Tchaikovsky 39/9

Future
Burgmüller 109
Bartok Sz 56
Mozart K331

Top
#2271016 - 05/04/14 03:00 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
hreichgott Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 1270
Loc: western MA, USA
+1 on the Mozart recommendation. Similar difficulty and much more interesting. And you get three really great, really different aspects of Mozart writing in the three movements.
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Working on: Schumann/Kinderszenen
Daily 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 2, Pischna
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

Top
#2271035 - 05/04/14 04:19 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
peterws Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3868
Loc: Northern England.
Originally Posted By: Saranoya


Peter, I like your suggestion for which Mozart Sonata to try. I had no idea the Rondo alla Turca came from that!



I didn`t either. I never got that far; it`s long enough just doing the movements in the first section. I found a few tricky bits in there . . .bit o` rewriting and it was fine . . grin
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes � but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

Top
#2271093 - 05/04/14 06:44 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: hreichgott]
WellTemperedPizza Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/26/13
Posts: 64
Loc: London, UK
Is this really of comparable difficulty? I'm learning K.545 at the moment and K.331 looks a fair bit harder.

Top
#2271123 - 05/04/14 07:42 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Sam S]
zillybug Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/11/11
Posts: 136
Loc: USA
I agree with Sam. Many of Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words are beautiful and you do learn a lot from them. They can be quite challenging in bringing out the melody. I have done 3 so far. The first 2 I did are the Venetian Boat Song, Ops 30, no 6 and then Consolation, opus 30, no 3. The last one I am working on now and at my teacher's insistence I am playing in a recital 2 weeks from today is On the Seashore, opus 53, no 1. It is really beautiful but I have found it much more difficult than the other two. Good luck with whatever you choose. I do think it is important to really love the music you are working on. My teacher had suggested May from Tchaikovsky's The Seasons so I listened to it and looked at the music but it just didn't speak to me so we went with the Chopin Nocturne in C minor, posthumous which I love but it will definitely take a lot of work.
Judy

Top
#2271194 - 05/04/14 10:45 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
MaryBee Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 1246
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Something Debussy, for sure. I feel like I never reach the bottom of his pieces; there are always more depths to explore. Some of the ones I've played and loved: Reverie (on the easier side), Girl with the Flaxen Hair (a little more difficult), Sarabande (lots of work, but very rewarding).

Picking out new pieces is so exciting. Have fun!
_________________________
Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
XVI-XXXVI

Top
#2271223 - 05/05/14 01:06 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: WellTemperedPizza]
peterws Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/21/12
Posts: 3868
Loc: Northern England.
Originally Posted By: WellTemperedPizza
Is this really of comparable difficulty? I'm learning K.545 at the moment and K.331 looks a fair bit harder.


The first section`s easy enough, and sounds lovely. The second is a bit harder . . .kinda goes on like that. But if you only get through the first two or three, it`s excellent stuff for building on. And Mozart had a sense of humour which other nusic lacks, imo.
_________________________
"I'm playing all the right notes � but not necessarily in the right order." Eric Morecambe

""

Top
#2271334 - 05/05/14 08:36 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: WellTemperedPizza]
hreichgott Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 1270
Loc: western MA, USA
Originally Posted By: WellTemperedPizza
Is this really of comparable difficulty? I'm learning K.545 at the moment and K.331 looks a fair bit harder.

Well, maybe it's somewhat harder, still similar. I'd guess maybe 1 grade apart on a syllabus if not the same grade. K.331 does have a legato octave passage in the first movement which is probably the hardest physical challenge.
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Working on: Schumann/Kinderszenen
Daily 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 2, Pischna
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

Top
#2271366 - 05/05/14 09:40 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
Ganddalf Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 699
Loc: Norway
I don't think any of the Mozart sonatas are simple. As an alternative I suggest one of the Haydn sonatas. My feeling is that most of them are technically easier than the Mozart sonatas and still they are both brilliant and extrovert. Very fun music both to play and to listen to.

Top
#2271367 - 05/05/14 09:53 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: hreichgott]
bennevis Online   content
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 5526
Originally Posted By: hreichgott
Originally Posted By: WellTemperedPizza
Is this really of comparable difficulty? I'm learning K.545 at the moment and K.331 looks a fair bit harder.

Well, maybe it's somewhat harder, still similar. I'd guess maybe 1 grade apart on a syllabus if not the same grade. K.331 does have a legato octave passage in the first movement which is probably the hardest physical challenge.

Don't you think that the broken octave passages in the finale (Rondo alla turca) are way harder than anything else - especially to play it without sounding jerky?

K545 is mostly scales and arpeggios.
_________________________
"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

Top
#2271386 - 05/05/14 11:00 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Ganddalf]
Saranoya Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 632
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Originally Posted By: Ganddalf
I don't think any of the Mozart sonatas are simple.


Well, Bennevis is right that K545 is mostly scales and arpeggios. I would say that therefore, it is *conceptually* simple. Doesn't make it particularly easy to play beautifully, though smile.

Originally Posted By: Ganddalf
As an alternative I suggest one of the Haydn sonatas. My feeling is that most of them are technically easier than the Mozart sonatas and still they are both brilliant and extrovert. Very fun music both to play and to listen to.


I hear you! Which one(s) would you recommend I consider starting with?
_________________________
Beginner with some priors since 9/2012

Currently Playable
Bach 846, 926, 930
Beethoven 27/2 mvt. 1
Burgmüller 100/3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 19, 25
Chopin 72/1
Clementi 36/1
Grieg 12/1, 7
Tchaikovsky 39/9

Future
Burgmüller 109
Bartok Sz 56
Mozart K331

Top
#2271387 - 05/05/14 11:03 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: MaryBee]
Saranoya Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 632
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Originally Posted By: MaryBee
Something Debussy, for sure. [...] Have fun!


Yeah, maybe it's time for some Debussy. I'll check out the ones you mentioned. Thanks! And oh, don't worry about the having fun part. What would be the point if I didn't, right?

smile
_________________________
Beginner with some priors since 9/2012

Currently Playable
Bach 846, 926, 930
Beethoven 27/2 mvt. 1
Burgmüller 100/3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 19, 25
Chopin 72/1
Clementi 36/1
Grieg 12/1, 7
Tchaikovsky 39/9

Future
Burgmüller 109
Bartok Sz 56
Mozart K331

Top
#2271398 - 05/05/14 11:36 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
Ganddalf Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/09
Posts: 699
Loc: Norway
Originally Posted By: Saranoya
Originally Posted By: Ganddalf
I don't think any of the Mozart sonatas are simple.


Well, Bennevis is right that K545 is mostly scales and arpeggios. I would say that therefore, it is *conceptually* simple. Doesn't make it particularly easy to play beautifully, though smile.

Originally Posted By: Ganddalf
As an alternative I suggest one of the Haydn sonatas. My feeling is that most of them are technically easier than the Mozart sonatas and still they are both brilliant and extrovert. Very fun music both to play and to listen to.


I hear you! Which one(s) would you recommend I consider starting with?


Oh, there are so many nice ones to choose from. My personal favorite is the A-flat major - Hob.XVI:46. Not the easiest Haydn sonata, but hardly as difficult as the Mozart sonatas.

Maybe you should consider the e-minor sonata Hob.XVI:34. The first movement is a Presto, but you don't need to push the limits to make it sound nice. Second and third movement are both managable, and still great music.

Also check out D-major Hob.XVI:19. It is very typical Haydn with delicate ornamentation and short phrases.

Some of the later Haydn sonatas are very interesting, but more difficult. At some places embellishments remind me of Chopin nocturnes. To start studying, however, I recommend looking at one of the easier ones.

Top
#2271404 - 05/05/14 11:51 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: bennevis]
hreichgott Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 1270
Loc: western MA, USA
Originally Posted By: bennevis
Don't you think that the broken octave passages in the finale (Rondo alla turca) are way harder than anything else - especially to play it without sounding jerky?

Not really. Not as long as you learn it slowly and relaxed first. I learned that movement in between Clementi Op. 36 no. 1 and Op. 36 no. 3. My teacher modified it for my small hands (at the time) by replacing the solid octave section with another broken octave section. I am pretty sure I remember working up to it by playing either the tune or just A major scales with only the thumb, then only finger 5, then alternating slowly.
I now have Rondo alla turca in a collection of "showpieces" for students at that level (includes Solfeggietto in C minor by CPE Bach, Ivan is Busy by Khachaturian, etc.)
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Working on: Schumann/Kinderszenen
Daily 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 2, Pischna
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

Top
#2271405 - 05/05/14 11:53 AM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
hreichgott Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 1270
Loc: western MA, USA
Haydn is a great choice too. You might look at the other E minor, XVI:47, whose first movement is a breathtaking Adagio. I haven't played the more well-known one, but I think XVI:47 is easier.

Clarification: XVI:47 is in E minor in my Wiener Urtext edition. Their notes say it is an early version of the F major sonata which normally carries the number XVI:47. In the F major sonata, the same breathtaking Adagio is there in F minor.


Edited by hreichgott (05/05/14 11:57 AM)
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Working on: Schumann/Kinderszenen
Daily 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 2, Pischna
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

Top
#2271425 - 05/05/14 12:42 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: hreichgott]
Saranoya Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 632
Loc: Brussels, Belgium
Thanks for all the great Haydn suggestions ...

... but I'm leaning towards Mozart wink. I'll take the Rondo alla Turca for a spin (I do think the technical challenges are a little more pronounced, there), and we'll see where I am a week from now.
_________________________
Beginner with some priors since 9/2012

Currently Playable
Bach 846, 926, 930
Beethoven 27/2 mvt. 1
Burgmüller 100/3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 19, 25
Chopin 72/1
Clementi 36/1
Grieg 12/1, 7
Tchaikovsky 39/9

Future
Burgmüller 109
Bartok Sz 56
Mozart K331

Top
#2271488 - 05/05/14 03:39 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
LarryShone Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/01/10
Posts: 1000
Loc: Darlington, UK
I would say Chopin's Raindrop Prelude. I took time out years ago to learn it and though Ive gone rusty witg not playing I can sort of muddle through it. I love the piece.
_________________________
If the piano is the King of instruments then I am its loyal servant.

My Soundcloud
Casio Celviano AP-450

Top
#2271508 - 05/05/14 04:13 PM Re: Looking for a new "stretch goal" [Re: Saranoya]
dynamobt Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/07/13
Posts: 738
Loc: NH
Funny you should mention the Raindrop Prelude. My teacher just gave that to me to learn.
_________________________
1918 Mason & Hamlin BB





Top

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
Christmas Header
- > Gift Ideas for Music Lovers < -
From PianoSupplies.com a division of Piano World.
-------------------
The December Free Piano Newsletter
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) Yamaha CP Music Rest Promo
Yamaha CP Music Rest Promo
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
(ad) Piano Music Sale - Dover Publications
Piano Music Sale
Sheet Music Plus (125)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Kawai Digital Piano
by Deegs23
12/18/14 03:28 PM
A new clip of the great Don Pullen in action
by rintincop
12/18/14 01:41 PM
A new clip of the great Don Pullen in action
by rintincop
12/18/14 01:38 PM
Digital piano Actions MP11,RD-800,CP4
by oliver123456
12/18/14 01:26 PM
Baldwin Howard Piano
by Deegs23
12/18/14 01:24 PM
Forum Stats
77340 Members
42 Forums
159958 Topics
2349128 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
Gift Ideas for Music Lovers!
Find the Perfect Gift for the Music Lovers on your List!
Visit our online store today.

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission