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#227879 - 01/30/09 06:52 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Numerian Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/04/05
Posts: 1075
This was a very enjoyable thread but I am still waiting for the photos of the Picts. Were they accompanied by any Druids?

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#227880 - 02/12/09 07:09 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Piano World Offline



Registered: 05/24/01
Posts: 5573
Loc: Parsonsfield, ME (orig. Nahant...
I mentioned the Fazioli with the 4th pedal earlier in this thread.

Just found out Keyboard Magazine has posted a video with Russian classical pianist Natalia Kartashova explaining the fourth pedal on a Fazioli...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLJqhRYk6lw

We (Kathy and I) had her Natalia play the same piece, the girl can play.
_________________________
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#227881 - 02/12/09 09:56 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
schwammerl Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/16/06
Posts: 2012
Loc: Belgium
The 4th pedal is not something exclusive to Fazioli and in fact not all that new.

Quite a few Wendl & Lungs, e.g. 178, 218 have been equiped with a fourth pedal. Series production shoud start any time soon now:

http://www.wendl-lung.com/jart/prj3/wend...rve-mode=active

This patenetd system was developed by Denis de La Rochfordiére; enjoy his website with a few videos aswell:

http://www.harmonicpianopedal.com/index-en.php

schwammerl.

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#227882 - 02/13/09 06:43 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Piano World Offline



Registered: 05/24/01
Posts: 5573
Loc: Parsonsfield, ME (orig. Nahant...
 Quote:
Originally posted by schwammerl:
The 4th pedal is not something exclusive to Fazioli and in fact not all that new.

Quite a few Wendl & Lungs, e.g. 178, 218 have been equiped with a fourth pedal. Series production shoud start any time soon now:

http://www.wendl-lung.com/jart/prj3/wend...rve-mode=active

This patenetd system was developed by Denis de La Rochfordiére; enjoy his website with a few videos aswell:

http://www.harmonicpianopedal.com/index-en.php

schwammerl. [/b]
True, 4th pedals have been around a long time.
But, this is the first time I've seen one in a grand that lifted all the hammers closer to the strings.
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-------------------------
It's Fun To Play the Piano ... PLEASE Pass It On!
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#227883 - 02/14/09 05:55 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
True, 4th pedals have been around a long time.
But, this is the first time I've seen one in a grand that lifted all the hammers closer to the strings.
Stuart & Sons pianos have had this feature from the beginning (1990).

http://cjmoore.blogs.exetel.com.au/index.php?/archives/9-Four-pedals-but-Ive-only-got-two-feet.html

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227884 - 02/14/09 08:54 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Piano World Offline



Registered: 05/24/01
Posts: 5573
Loc: Parsonsfield, ME (orig. Nahant...
 Quote:
Originally posted by CJM:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
True, 4th pedals have been around a long time.
But, this is the first time I've seen one in a grand that lifted all the hammers closer to the strings.
Stuart & Sons pianos have had this feature from the beginning (1990).

http://cjmoore.blogs.exetel.com.au/index.php?/archives/9-Four-pedals-but-Ive-only-got-two-feet.html

Regards
Chris [/b]
Thanks Chris.

I just took their web site tour (the Flash version). Interesting pianos, very pretty.
http://www.stuartandsons.com/

Are they only available in Australia?
Do they exhibit at NAMM?
_________________________
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-------------------------
It's Fun To Play the Piano ... PLEASE Pass It On!
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#227885 - 02/14/09 09:54 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Numerian Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/04/05
Posts: 1075
Reading their promotional material, it appears that there are four left pedals available now.

1) The traditional una corda, which shifts all the hammers so that not all the strings are struck by the hammer, and so that the strings strike a softer part of the hammer (off the strike point). The effect is a tonal diminution as well as a subtle change in tone altogether.

2) The Fazioli fourth pedal, which is a half-blow mechanism that moves all the hammers half way closer to the strings. The effect mutes the sound so that you get tonal diminution, but since the hammers and strings are meeting in their usual place, the una corda change in tone is lacking.

3) The Stuart & Sons fourth pedal, which is also a half blow mechanism working the same way as the Fazioli fourth pedal. However, whereas the Fazioli fourth pedal is a distinct distance from the una corda, the Stuart & Sons fourth pedal is placed the same distance from the una corda as the sostenuto on the right. This allows the player to maneuver the left foot on to both the fourth and una corda pedal, so now you can create multiple qualities of tone in combination with the mute effect of the fourth pedal.

4) The Wendl & Lung fourth pedal, called the harmonic pedal. This appears to be a combination of the half-blow pedal with a sostenuto affect. In other words, you can play a chord with a half-blow tone, but hold it using the fourth pedal while playing on the rest of the keyboard without the half-blow muted affect. This allows many overtones of the chord to be subtly added to the rest of the music.

All the manufacturers emphasize that the half-blow mechanism on their grand pianos is different from the same mechanism found on some uprights. On uprights the effect seems to be to create a quiet but rather deadened tone, or as one manufacturer put it, a quiet tone that won't have the neighbors complaining. The richness of the tone disappears, but on a grand piano the richness remains.

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#227886 - 02/14/09 05:44 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:

Thanks Chris.

I just took their web site tour (the Flash version). Interesting pianos, very pretty.
http://www.stuartandsons.com/

Are they only available in Australia?
Do they exhibit at NAMM?
The 'prettiness' is not restricted to the veneer :-)

Stuart pianos are available world-wide, but only directly through the factory in Newcastle, north of Sydney. They don't exhibit at NAMM.

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227887 - 02/14/09 05:59 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Numerian:
The Stuart & Sons fourth pedal, which is also a half blow mechanism working the same way as the Fazioli fourth pedal. However, whereas the Fazioli fourth pedal is a distinct distance from the una corda, the Stuart & Sons fourth pedal is placed the same distance from the una corda as the sostenuto on the right. This allows the player to maneuver the left foot on to both the fourth and una corda pedal, so now you can create multiple qualities of tone in combination with the mute effect of the fourth pedal.
This is correct and unique to the Stuart. It takes a bit of getting used to, but it is now very natural (and very effective) for me.

If you check out the video on the Fazioli, you will see that this is not possible on that piano.

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227888 - 02/14/09 06:01 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
charleslang Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 2079
I wonder if anyone has experimented with a pedal that changes the hammer strike point line. You could make it affect only part of the line maybe, or maybe all of it (I'm thinking if you did all of it the high tenor would get disproportionately affected).
_________________________
Charles Lang
Working on: A Night in Tunisia; Memories of Tomorrow (Keith Jarrett).
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Baldwin Model R (1974), Hardman 5'9" grand (1915), Rieger-Kloss 42.5" vertical

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#227889 - 02/16/09 12:42 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
Fazioli has a 4 pedal grand on display. The 4th pedal actually lifts the action closer to the strings (at the same time lowering the keys to maintain balance with no lost motion).
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
Just found out Keyboard Magazine has posted a video with Russian classical pianist Natalia Kartashova explaining the fourth pedal on a Fazioli...
Listening to this again, I find it interesting that she demonstrates this pedal simply to provide a quieter sound. In fact, in the Stuart & Sons piano this is only a minor part of the whole philosophy behind the fourth pedal. Like the Fazioli, not only are the hammers moved closer to the strings but the key depth is reduced. This is not to 'maintain balance' as quoted above, but is a consequence of the fact that the distance the hammer and the key travel are vital in the production of certain harmonics which are translated into what we hear and feel as the sound’s attack and decay transients.

In the normal context of the correct regulation of the grand piano action, a reduction or narrowing of the hammer’s striking distance from what is considered the minimum distance (45mm) for so-called normal function affects the sound envelope by reducing certain harmonic developments which give the sound a particular warm or cloistered effect and removes the vertical driving projection from the sound envelope. This can be interpreted and indeed, experienced as a more lateral projection of the sound envelope. This peculiar effect can give the sense of a more distant, less aggressive sound. A similar effect can be obtained by reducing the travel of the key only. This is the reason this pedal is called the 'dolce pedal'.

It must be noted that decreasing both the striking distance and the key depth in this way by depressing the fourth pedal magnifies the combined outcome and produces a distinctive quality that cannot be achieved by finger control alone. This is the result of mechanical dynamics in a leverage system designed to convert kinetic energy into an acoustic response disregarding the nature of the playing technique employed. This is something many players do not fully appreciate, understand or like to hear as it means that there are certain mechanical limits to the artistic aspirations of the pianist. This is also a factor in the Steingraber Phoenix's combination of the two functions in the one pedal - clearly a very limited attempt to harness a very wide tonal pallette.

What the Fazioli misses by the somewhat obscure pedal placement, and Steingraeber in their 'two into one' pedal mechanism, in their approaches to a fourth pedal function is the crucial importance of independently utilising both the dolce or kinetic moderator function of the fourth pedal together with the shift or reduction in the number of strings struck function of the third pedal. These functions have significant potential to reveal a whole new sound pallette for musical interpretation and from my own and others' experience on these pianos, only those who have mastered the concept of the two pedals on the Stuart piano can have any idea of this importance and significance. Those who fully understand the function and can hear the results have been ardent supporters of this advanced addition to influence the dynamic and textural aspects of a composition. To bring together such potential for artistic sensitivity hitherto unavailable in the standard piano must surely be an advantage.

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227890 - 02/16/09 12:48 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Piano World Offline



Registered: 05/24/01
Posts: 5573
Loc: Parsonsfield, ME (orig. Nahant...
Interesting Chris,

But why couldn't one just depress both the 4th and 3rd pedals on the Fazioli, which would then move the hammers closer and also shift the strike point?

Fazioli claims they designed their 4th pedal this way on purpose, so one could create the pianissimo effect while retaining the harmonics of all the strings (my awkward attempt at explaining it as it was explained to me).
_________________________
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Founder / Host
www.PianoWorld.com
www.PianoSupplies.com
Find Us On:
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-------------------------
It's Fun To Play the Piano ... PLEASE Pass It On!
And please invite everyone you know to join our piano forums!
Coming to Maine? We're in Parsonsfield (southwest) let's get together!


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#227891 - 02/16/09 02:45 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
Interesting Chris,

But why couldn't one just depress both the 4th and 3rd pedals on the Fazioli, which would then move the hammers closer and also shift the strike point?

Fazioli claims they designed their 4th pedal this way on purpose, so one could create the pianissimo effect while retaining the harmonics of all the strings (my awkward attempt at explaining it as it was explained to me).
If you look at the video closely, you'll see that the arrangement of the two pedals makes it virtually impossible to control both at the same time with the left foot. Why they designed it this way is beyond me.

This is not the case with the Stuart, where control of the two pedals is simply a case of rolling the ankle slightly since the pedals are right next to each other.

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227892 - 02/16/09 06:18 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Numerian Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/04/05
Posts: 1075
I think Frank is asking why wouldn't you use your left foot on Fazioli's fourth pedal and your right foot on the third, or una corda pedal to produce the same affects you can achieve on a Stuart.

In my limited experience playing a Fazioli fourth pedal, this certainly crossed my mind, and I did find a whole other range of dynamic affects were available using two feet on each pedal at the same time.

But then you give up the use of the right foot on the damper pedal, and that is not desirable in most music.

The ideal situation is as Chris describes: right foot on the damper, and left foot simultaneously toggling the fourth and third pedals. It shouldn't be beyond the skill of most talented pianists to learn how to do this and use the two left pedals to maximum advantage. Organists, after all, have to learn foot dexterity as a fundamental part of their craft.

Unfortunately, this benefit may be consigned only to the talented amateurs who can afford a Fazioli or Stuart, and to their friends who may be fortunate enough to hear them play privately using these innovations. It would take an exceptionally brave or secure professional artist to do this publicly. Given all the other demands for perfection in piano performance, professionals would not want to jeopardize a concert's success by using a fourth pedal. I suspect there would also be a few antedeluvian purists who might complain that they could no longer compare artistic performances because the playing field was no longer level.

It's hard enough getting concert artists to break away from the security of playing a Steinway, or to get teachers from insisting that serious students should only practice on Steinways because that is all they will see in the concert world. Fazioli doesn't even offer the fourth pedal as standard equipment on its concert grands; it only comes standard on the 308 model, and even here the buyer gets two separate lyres so that they can put the fourth pedal in storage if it is just too risky or daunting for them.

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#227893 - 02/16/09 07:45 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Numerian:
I think Frank is asking why wouldn't you use your left foot on Fazioli's fourth pedal and your right foot on the third, or una corda pedal to produce the same affects you can achieve on a Stuart.
My apologies ... I missed that interpretation, and that is certainly possible, but as you say ...

 Quote:
But then you give up the use of the right foot on the damper pedal, and that is not desirable in most music.
In any piano music, IHMO. In practice, I use the right foot for the damper pedal and the left for the other three.

 Quote:
In my limited experience playing a Fazioli fourth pedal, this certainly crossed my mind, and I did find a whole other range of dynamic affects were available using two feet on each pedal at the same time.
Which is precisely what you get with the Stuart, but you can do it with only one foot... In fact Mark Gasser has been known to use all four pedals at the same time. Now that _is_ a feat...(pun intended).

 Quote:
The ideal situation is as Chris describes: right foot on the damper, and left foot simultaneously toggling the fourth and third pedals. It shouldn't be beyond the skill of most talented pianists to learn how to do this and use the two left pedals to maximum advantage.
Correct. My students don't have any trouble with this.

 Quote:
Unfortunately, this benefit may be consigned only to the talented amateurs who can afford a Fazioli or Stuart, and to their friends who may be fortunate enough to hear them play privately using these innovations. It would take an exceptionally brave or secure professional artist to do this publicly. Given all the other demands for perfection in piano performance, professionals would not want to jeopardize a concert's success by using a fourth pedal. I suspect there would also be a few antedeluvian purists who might complain that they could no longer compare artistic performances because the playing field was no longer level.
A number of pianists here in Australia, including Ian Munro, Michael Kieran Harvey, Simon Tedeschi and Mark Gasser, have recorded/concertised on the Stuart piano with great success - particularly with 20th century repertoire such as Messaien, Elliot Carter, and Carl Vine. And then of course there's Gerard Willems' monumental Beethoven cycle. I have a recording of one of these concerts which is absolutely stunning both in terms of pianism and pianistic sound.

 Quote:
It's hard enough getting concert artists to break away from the security of playing a Steinway, or to get teachers from insisting that serious students should only practice on Steinways because that is all they will see in the concert world. Fazioli doesn't even offer the fourth pedal as standard equipment on its concert grands; it only comes standard on the 308 model, and even here the buyer gets two separate lyres so that they can put the fourth pedal in storage if it is just too risky or daunting for them.
Your point is well made. Stuart & Sons don't adopt the Fazioli approach in this regard. Every Stuart piano has four pedals.

Seriously, once you get used to it you'll never go back to a three pedal piano.

Regards
Chris

PS my apologies to all for wandering off-topic.
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227894 - 02/16/09 08:13 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Numerian Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/04/05
Posts: 1075
I've said this before but it is worth repeating.

For anyone reading this thread it is highly recommended that you access Dr. Christopher Moore's personal blog which he provides as a link in his tagline (see the post above).

Read all six pages. You'll find an intelligent and perceptive accounting of his love affair with the Stuart & Sons piano. It reflects the qualities of a pianist who embraces the enormous variety to be found in the piano repertoire, and who is eager to exploit the benefits of the many innovations Wayne Stuart has brought to the instrument.

Of course, you'll be salivating to own one of these pianos...

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#227895 - 02/16/09 05:52 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Numerian:
I've said this before but it is worth repeating.

For anyone reading this thread it is highly recommended that you access Dr. Christopher Moore's personal blog which he provides as a link in his tagline (see the post above).

Read all six pages. You'll find an intelligent and perceptive accounting of his love affair with the Stuart & Sons piano. It reflects the qualities of a pianist who embraces the enormous variety to be found in the piano repertoire, and who is eager to exploit the benefits of the many innovations Wayne Stuart has brought to the instrument.

Of course, you'll be salivating to own one of these pianos... [/b]
Thank you.

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227896 - 02/18/09 01:19 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
CJM Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 144
Loc: Sydney, Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by Numerian:
It's hard enough getting concert artists to break away from the security of playing a Steinway, or to get teachers from insisting that serious students should only practice on Steinways because that is all they will see in the concert world. Fazioli doesn't even offer the fourth pedal as standard equipment on its concert grands; it only comes standard on the 308 model, and even here the buyer gets two separate lyres so that they can put the fourth pedal in storage if it is just too risky or daunting for them.
What you are saying is consistent with my view that there is considerable evidence of a deep seated fear of change by performers and teachers at all levels and the fixation on and exploitation of that innate fear of change by the major players in the market. This is precisely why pianists, in this context, can and should be considered as practicing a dead art form. Any so-called art form where the participants are afraid of change to the extent they shun innovation has got to be fundamentally decadent. The reason why Fazioli has taken such a circuitous approach to the fourth pedal is buried in this fear. Bosendorfer covered and then coloured the subcontra octave – out of fear from the conservative reaction. Richard Dain combined the two soft pedal functions into one on the Phoenix because he felt pianists would be more comfortable with three rather than four pedals. How can any art form seriously progress given such restrictions?

 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
An overview of our impressions from NAMM 2009
In addition to piano manufacturers continuing to introduce new models, we found there were individuals developing new ideas.
Frank, how much _serious_ innovation was there at NAMM? I'm discounting the Mason & Hamlin gravity-defying piano lid (that's just an amusing gimmick with no real value to the practicing musician), the Fazioli fourth pedal (because it doesn't really go far enough as we've noted in this thread), the 'prettying' of a piano by weird and wonderful finishes (or lack thereof) and 'improving' the design of some pianos because the current designs were not up to scratch in the first place.

Surely an industry facing the current economic downturn would turn to a forward thinking and innovative approach to recovery and development. From what you've shown, I can't see any evidence of this.

Regards
Chris
_________________________
Stuart & Sons 2.2 metre #25

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#227897 - 02/18/09 02:15 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Gtrist Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/17/09
Posts: 5
Loc: Right here
That's some cool stuff.

I'd love to go to a NAMM show, but as it's not open to the general public--I'd need a new job.

That Burl under the top of the grand back a few pages was beautiful.

One of my favorite things about NAMM though--is the oddities .

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#227898 - 02/18/09 11:23 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Piano World Offline



Registered: 05/24/01
Posts: 5573
Loc: Parsonsfield, ME (orig. Nahant...
 Quote:
Originally posted by CJM:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano World:
An overview of our impressions from NAMM 2009
In addition to piano manufacturers continuing to introduce new models, we found there were individuals developing new ideas.
Frank, how much _serious_ innovation was there at NAMM? I'm discounting the Mason & Hamlin gravity-defying piano lid (that's just an amusing gimmick with no real value to the practicing musician), the Fazioli fourth pedal (because it doesn't really go far enough as we've noted in this thread), the 'prettying' of a piano by weird and wonderful finishes (or lack thereof) and 'improving' the design of some pianos because the current designs were not up to scratch in the first place.

Surely an industry facing the current economic downturn would turn to a forward thinking and innovative approach to recovery and development. From what you've shown, I can't see any evidence of this.

Regards
Chris [/b]
Chris,

There is a big difference between true "innovation" and novelty.

We are talking about an instrument that has been around for over 300 years. Most of the major innovations were made in its first 250 years.

I'm not sure changing something just because you can is reason enough. Big changes like the overstrung design, full plates, etc. are harder to come by.

While some of the "innovations" over the years were interesting, they hardly proved practical, or acceptable to the playing public at large.









Even the "4th pedals" we've been discussing may or may not survive. While there functionality is interesting, I'm guessing the average pianist wouldn't consider it a reason to purchase one piano over another.

You can bet with thousands of manufacturers (over the last 300 years), many things have been tried, and many have failed.

Changes now seem to be less dramatic

As for what "innovations" were displayed at this years NAMM show, I'm sure there were things I missed.
There were other people in attendance who have a keener eye for these things than I do.
I'm thinking of folks like Del Fandrich, Marty & Jennifer Flinn (authors of The Complete Idiots Guide to Buying a Piano), Larry Fine (author of the Piano Book), and many more.

And yet changes do continue to happen.

I'm thinking of things like the Stanwood Action, or the Wapin Bridge, or more recently the Wessell, Nickel & Gross composite action.

However, if you are talking about extreme changes, things that effect the way the instrument is played... At what point do you start to morph into an instrument that is no longer a piano in the traditional sense?

(Still, I'd like to have tried one of those Janko keyboards \:\) )
_________________________
- Frank B.
Founder / Host
www.PianoWorld.com
www.PianoSupplies.com
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Estonia L-190, Yamaha P-80, Hammond XK-3, Hammond A-100, Estey 1895 Pump Organ
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#227899 - 02/18/09 12:33 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Steve Cohen Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 10460
Loc: Maryland/DC/No. VA
The piano is a "classic" instrument. I don't hear a clammering for innovation in the violin, sax, clarinet, trumpet, trombone, etc.

The innovation front in musical instruments is slanted to the electronic instruments like digital pianos, synths, and somewhat in electric guitars.
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Piano Industry Consultant- http://www.linkedin.com/pub/steve-cohen/6/b92/b80

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Since 1937.

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My postings, unless stated otherwise, are my personal opinions, not those of my clients.

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#227900 - 02/22/09 10:16 PM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff
Mario Bruneau Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/16/06
Posts: 133
Loc: Québec, Canada
Hi all,

Here is what I know about the fourth pedal on a Wendl&Lung grand piano.

It was invented by the french Denis De La Rochefordière and is know improved and applied by the other french piano designers Stephen Paulello and Claire Pichet.

When completely depressed to the flor, the Harmonic Pedal behave just like the sustain pedal, i.e. raising all the dampers from the strings. BUT if you release it half way, and keep it in this position, all the dampers are still raised but from now on, all the notes you play will have their dampers going down to the string thus killing its sound.

As you can see, it is a sort of "inverted full sostenuto pedal" I mean, the Harmonic Pedal does the exact oposite of the full sostenuto pedal.

Hope it helps!

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#1297034 - 10/31/09 04:56 AM Re: NAMM 2009 - Picts & Stuff [Re: Numerian]
rachmad Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 07/26/06
Posts: 7
Loc: new zealand
Originally Posted By: Numerian
Reading their promotional material, it appears that there are four left pedals available now.

Steinbraeber-Phoenix has an array of innovative features, carbon fibre soundboard, bridge agraffes (virtually zero downbearing), adjustable hitchpins and finally a double-blow softpedal. This combines the standard soft for the first part of the travel and the raising of the hammers for the remainder:
http://steingraeberpianos.com/news/phoenix.html

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